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Calvin

My seiko speedtimer 7015 keeps stopping when the chronograph activated but runs smoothly wheh chronograph off

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Hello guys,

I have some problem with my seiko 7015 speedtimer that i bought 2 days ago..

This seiko runs smoothly when chronograph off

And when the chronograph is active,the watch runs for awhile and then stop..

Whats wrong with it and maybe you guys can help me with some solution please!!

thanks

20190221_115443.jpg

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Interesting...It's usually the other way around. Watch stops when chronograph stopped.

I think the second hand may be touching the glass. (its sitting to high?)

Or the centre chronograph wheel is warped and dragging on something maybe.

Or lastly the power reserve is poor and extra needed to run second hand is not enough.

Edited by Melt

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On 2/22/2019 at 3:05 PM, Calvin said:

This seiko runs smoothly when chronograph off

And when the chronograph is active,the watch runs for awhile and then stop..

Does anyone have any idea what the cause may be? I have the same problem. Movement was cleaned and oiled. With chrono off everything is ok. When chrono is on movement stops but it stops in the same second hand position. I think that could be some friction between 4th wheel located on chrono wheel and with the coupling lever. I must do some revision at this point...

friction.jpg

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I have no idea so sorry for not being able help. But as I love watching watch repairing videos, this one came to my mind when reading your post. I think it's the oposite problem, the watch stopping with the chrono off, but just in case it has something to do.

I apologize if it has nothing to do with your question :angel:

 

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I grab a seconds wheel spoke by tweezers, push to turn the wheel past the point it gets stuck. If it stops over and again at the same point, I go for visual examination of teeth under high magnification.

I ususally mark a dot on all subsequent wheels, to check their postion of, at stops, and work my way back to the fault. Needless to say the fault is expectedly at a joint of chrono complication and the base caliber. Unless a culprit, only your checks can be advised to a lead to the fault.

Best Regards.         Joe the:judge:man. 

 

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I removed coupling lever near chrono wheel to be sure that it is not a cause of stuck the movement. Nothing change. Than I removed pallet fork and let the movement run freely. When I looked closer the chrono wheel I noticed that the shaft is bent and cause the 4th wheel does not run in horizontal position but it is "wavy". I do not think I could repair it... :(

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Hi  You could try using a pin vise, place the bent shaft in the vise and gently close the vise, Checking for progress each time. Doing this will hopefully put pressure on the shaft evenly and as long as the shaft is not pot hard it will probably work. The key word is work slowly with frequent checking. The wavey wheel is probably due to the bent shaft, but if that is not the case and you get the shaft straight then using strong tweezers you can straighten the wheel.  Take great care and do not rush the job.

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I replaced the chrono wheel for another one and... the same. Movement stucks but in the other seconds hand position. I have no idea. When chrono is off and clutch is on everythings is ok. It's strange - usually it is going other way - stops when chrono off.
I inspected all wheels, cleaned them one more time by rodico and got them bath in aceton. No result

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