Jump to content
  • 0
Calvin

My Seiko 7015 Chrobograph Stop and Heavy When its night and time to day/date change

Question

Hello guys..

Why my seiko speedtimer 7015 chronograph run smoothly when its day(morning till evening)

But its stop and heavy when its time to changing the day date,whats the problem and how to fix it..

Thankyiuu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

Could be a few things. 

Is it stiff when changing the time if so it's the cannon pinion too tight.

The day or date wheels are buckled or more likely the the date drive wheel or day finger is bent and catching.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

This is the hallmark of seiko, day date jump stuck half way for the whole day and good part of yesterady and the rest of tommorow:lol:

Service may help. I have seen some with day date disconnected just to have something that runs. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Similar Content

    • By RyMoeller
      I wish I had more projects to report on but things have really bogged down lately as I continue to bite of more than I can chew.  I'm in the middle of three long term projects (the Favre Leuba Bivouac going on year three) and am running short of workbench space.  I'm in the middle of changing out the engine in my wife's Mini Cooper too (that's another story but if you own a Mini- be sure and replace the timing chain guides!) and that has really eaten into my "fun time".
      I thought I'd bring this one to the board for comments before I'm underwater- it's an old Gallet from the 60's.  Do you think it can be salvaged?

      We clearly have some water damaged however, the seconds hand will move if the crown is given a little pressure. 

      Water entered in through the chronograph buttons and the pendant tube.  I haven't tried depressing the buttons- I think that would just lead to bits snapping and rust moving about.
      I'll need a new stem for sure...

      The dial actually looks quite good.


      I wonder what it looks like underneath though...

      It's not terrible, but it's not great either.  Most of the rust damage is concentrated in the keyless works.

      There's a bit of damage to the hour recording mechanism...

      That's as far as I've gotten thus far.  The screw for the Operating Lever is rusted tight and is now being treated with a bit of penetrating oil.  Once removed I can pull the second pusher button out and remove the movement from the case.  I'll know the full extent of the damage once it's in a pile of bits and pieces.
      This is an Excelsior Park EP40-68 movement.  I've wanted to work on one of these for quite a while but couldn't afford a proper working piece. Excelsior Park parts are difficult to source though so I may not be able to bring this one back to life.
    • By rduckwor
      Does anyone have a source for the two - ended shock springs for a 7s26 movement.  My is in the Netherlands.  Not the three lobed DiaShock , but the cheaper two-ended.  I cannot locate them on Cousins or Ofrei.  Sieko "hold spring" P# 0015703

      Thanks,

      RMD
    • By George19
      Howdy,
       
      Well, this is my first effort of a watch repair. I have been fascinated with watches, clocks and all kinds of mechanical things since a young age. I decided at this time that working on watches would be a great hobby/interest to take up in my later years. I have already spent some time learning to refurbish and repair fishing reels in the last few years. So here is my first repair attempt.
       
      Interest in tinkering watches started when I dropped my Seiko SKX009KD diver to the tile floor in the bathroom. Was not too good an idea to put a watch on there with a towel thrown over it, pulled the towel and down comes the watch, face down on the tile floor. Needless to say, I picked it up and took a look, nothing seen. Then I shake it and hear a rattle. Not too good!
       
      So I did some research on the 7S26C movements. Read a lot of information and watched a lot of videos. Thanks to all that makes this information available. So I purchased a cheap watch tool kit from Amazon. I had other watches that needed batteries and some strap work anyway. I knew the kit would not be 'pro' grade, but it was a nice kit with all the basic tools needed.
      Back to the rattle, I figured the Oscillating Weight (OW) had become separated from the bearing. So I used the case back wrench in the kit and opened the back, and sure enough that was the problem. I looked on-line for a replacement OW but could not find any except one on Ebay for $35! So I decided, what the heck, I'll try to repair this one. So, here is what I did being a little mechanically inclined but never at this small a scale, I performed the following:
      1) remove case back.
      2) examine the OW, it was dislodged/loose from the bearing.
      3) remove center OW bearing from center post.
      4) place OW on a small anvil, then use a small pin punch from the kit as to carefully work the metal around the OW's hole as to make the bearing hole smaller.
      6) After enough working with the punch, I took a smooth round stone and gently kept working the ID of the OW hole until it just would friction fit to the surface of the OW bearing.
      7) carefully press fit the bearing into the OW, I knew too much pressure would ruin the small bearing races and ball bearings.
      8) finalized fitting of the bearing to the OW by applying a very small amount of red Locktite thread locker using the end of a pin as an 'oiler'.
      9) I then let the OW set for a day to cure the Locktite
      10) install OW per alignment instructions in the 7S26C technical guide. At this time I also wound the mainspring up 8 turns to check the power, it ran for about 40 hours.
      11) did not have any watch oil, so I used a very small amount of some 10W synthetic engine oil using a small pin as the oiler to lubricate the OW bearing ONLY.
      It appears to be a successful repair for now, watch been running great and keeping good time for about 2 months. I'm sure something else might have gotten damaged during the fall, especially the balance assembly, but then again the watch is working fine for now. I might use this particular watch to dive deeper into the 7S26 movement at a later time. Kind of happy for now. Got 2 other watches running with new batteries, fitted some straps and having fun with my new hobby. Look forward to learning some more. Now to find a 'bag o watches at a flea market and get busy. I know I'm going to need more and quality tools down the road, that's OK with me.
      Cheers,
      Chip
      ---




    • By abiatthas
      Hi, All
      I'm Newbie for watch repair. I have watch Seiko presmatic 1968 cal.5106-9000. the movement is to old and i want to replace the movement with other cheap movement.
      what type of movement that i can use it to replace the movement. I need your advice please.
      oh ya if it possible replacement with china movement, what type i can use tp replace it ?
      Thank You so Much
    • By Marc5555
      So im going to replace this band. A straight replacement band would be easy buy i want to change it with a leather without using a 10mm band what would be the best way to go about this?

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I've never used the Longines archive extract but it has to be applauded for offering this as a free service, I have however used the Omega extract service which has a charge attached to it, that service was also good and included the Model number and Name year of manufacture and which retailer originally sold the watch and in which country. I have also had good experiences with a company called Eberhard many years ago, I needed some parts for a old chronograph I  bought at a local auction  I needed a full set of hands a winding crown, and oval pushers, on the off chance they may still have these I wrote to them with the serial number and received a very nice letter back from them telling me that my watch had been manufactured in 1938 and was a two button 18ct rose gold chronograph and that they did have the parts and would be happy to supply them for 65 Swiss francs. Try doing that with any of the large manufactures, their response was a pleasant surprise. I had the watch for many years but sadly I had it stolen about 5 years ago.
    • Thank you for your introduction and welcome to this friendly forum. Where is NL
    • It's ok if that's how she self identified.
    • Personally I would see if incabloc springs fit.
    • Thanks a lot guys ... I'll do some test and show the results. I really love that dial though it's pretty stained and scratched so I'll try first with Rodico, Q-tips and distilled water and see how it goes. There is no financial risk as I got it for cheap ($40 shipped) but those 1002 dials don't often show up on the net and are sold for much more, even if they are damaged ... plus I have a nice 5500 case that's waiting for a dial    By the way ... did anyone of you ever drilled an ETA 2840 mainplate to make place for Rolex dial feets ? I'm asking because I have the case, the low beat ETA and a handset that could fit but I don't think I could ever cut the feets of a Beyeler Rolex dial 
×
×
  • Create New...