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I recently found a vintage Pobeda wristwatch in my basement, model 1980-1989. Sadly, it is very old and not maintained at all, maybe since the early 1990s. It is mechanical, so I tried to wind it, but of course it couldn't wind. There is a resistant when I try to do it, so I opened its back and checked what's going on. It appears to me, that the Crown Wheel and the Ratchet Wheel are either too tight, or not lubricated/rusty or whatever the reason may be. Also I found out that when I move the watch around, it winds itself, as if it is an automatic one (it certainly does NOT have any rotor, so that is weird). So I was wondering what has to be done, at this moment I don't have any repair tools. If someone can at least give me a direction as to what has to be done, I could search for some tools. I'm not so worried about the watch itself, although it has a sentimental meaning to me, but am curious to find out what the reason for the problem is.

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@OpenHeart; I like your forum name :biggrin: !!

Even though I have plenty on my watch-plate just now, I'll try to make some time for my "weak-spot"; Russian watches. I think you have a nice looking watch and the dial seems to have survived time quite well.

Would it be possible to get some pictures of the movement, that's, in the end of the day, were the action is ...... perhaps there are some numbers stamped and we can find out what kind of movement we are dealing with?

Edited by Endeavor

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9 minutes ago, Endeavor said:

@OpenHeart; I like your forum name :biggrin: !!

Even though I have plenty on my watch-plate just now, I'll try to make some time for my "weak-spot"; Russian watches. I think you have a nice looking watch and the dial seems to have survived time quite well.

Would it be possible to get some pictures of the movement, that's, in the end of the day, were the action is ...... perhaps there are some numbers stamped and we can find out what kind of movement we are dealing with?

Desktop.7z

Here is a photo of the movement, unfortunately no numbers visible... You see, when I tried to wind it today, I found out that it winded just fine... weird, right, I mean yesterday it didn't move a bit... I will leave it in a box and check the accuracy these days. I will let you know of the result.

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Great, probably the watch has been asleep for so long and it didn't wanted to be woken up :biggrin:

Your 2nd picture, the movement, didn't come with your answer...... ? There is some weird link with "Desktop.7z", but that one isn't recognized by any of my software.

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Hi,  running as the watch is moved,   indicates good balance complete meanng the staff of the balance are not broken, and perhaps the  entire power train works.

If you will post picture of movement for all to see which certainly invites more members to join in.

You should be able to wind through ratchet wheel with your thumb ,This should as I think let you see the watch run for a day or more. You may find the stem not wanting to come out, let us see the pic and tell techniques for removal of the crown to take the movement out and furthure removing the hands and dial  plate. 

Generous lubrication of all rusted screws and allow a several days time for the oil to sink in is a must.  Rust killers like B12 or WD40  or diesel fuel, carosene are suitable.

Next I,ll show you how to make a screw driver easily if you don,t have access to one.

The decision to go for it is yours, Let us know.

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@OpenHeart and @Nucejoe; It seems to me that Openheart is new to watches. To submerge a movement in any fluid requires the hands and dial to be taken off. Next to that, after it has been submerged, the movement requires a total strip, a thorough clean and a full lubrication (cap-stones ect). All daunting task for a newbie who even hasn't got the tools yet.

Therefor I don't think it is wise to submerge the watch in anything until Openhart has the skills, confidence and knowledge to do so. On this forum are plenty of people who are willing to guide Openhart step for step until he reaches that point. Lets first see what the watch does, what it requires and how far Openhart is willing to go......

Edited by Endeavor

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Hm, I'm sorry, but somehow I can't upload any images, maybe they're too big (3 mb)!?

Otherwise, as I was able to wind it yesterday, today (at around the 20th hour after winding) it was -3 and a half hours inaccurate.
1) I guess I haven't winded it up to the max, so it didn't have enough power.
2) Maybe there is a bigger problem after all.

@Nucejoe @Endeavor Yup, I'm a total newbie. I am certainly not able to do all of the above mentioned at the moment. I consider taking the watch to a specialist and see what he will say. If he takes any action, I will kindly ask him to make me part of the process and explain and/or show what is being done. By then, I will continue checking the accuracy and try to wind it twice a day.

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I didn,t see any mention submerging the movement in fluid posted in the thread.

Openhart says, it seems the crown is too tight, it appears not lubricated/ rusty.therefore; I personally did speak of generois lubrication of all " rusted"  screws and allow days for oil to sink in. Then made mention of rust killer. Since WD40 mainly comes in sprayers , allow me to add " do not spray" over the movement.

I am all ears if other method is recommended  for facilitating removal of rusted screws, in case of no rusted screws no need to lubricate.

Openhart adds " I could search for tools" furthermore " I am not worried about the watch, though it has sentimental values." 

I offered to show openhart how to make a screw driver.

I conclude my msg to openhart with   " the decision to go for it is yours" 

Am I on the right forum here?  Is this watchrepairtalk? 

Regards

 

 

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@OpenHeart: Some watch repair specialist may not be fund of Russian watches. There are various reasons for. Don't despair if his/her advice is negative. That will certainly not be the end of your watch! It sounds like that, after all those years, it needs a proper service to start with.

See how far you get by a specialist and report back if you decide to tackle the challenge yourself. Next to all well meant advice here on the forum, there are also plenty of watch repair video's on Youtube, for example Marks video's: https://www.youtube.com/user/jewldood/videos

 

Edited by Endeavor

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On 9/12/2018 at 5:52 AM, OpenHeart said:

Here is a photo of the movement, unfortunately no numbers visible

so photographs did attach sort of and I'm reattaching the movement photo so everyone can see it. Then I have a question notice I've zoomed in to the area under the balance wheel? This is a classic location where manufacturers of watch movements tell you which movement it is. So I can see a little writing but I can't see it 100% so if you could look and ell us what's written under their that might be helpful.

 

On 9/12/2018 at 4:19 AM, OpenHeart said:

If someone can at least give me a direction as to what has to be done, I could search for some tools. I'm not so worried about the watch itself, although it has a sentimental meaning to me, but am curious to find out what the reason for the problem is.

then I've quoted this because I find it interesting? So if you're not worried about the watch outstanding because usually the first watch you work on has a very high likelihood of undesirable things occurring to it. But you also say it has a sentimental meaning so destroying a sentimental meaning is this going to be a good thing or bad thing for you?

then as already mentioned this is a Russian the watch. Russian watches are interesting they use lots of clever techniques to get around manufacturing issues. This can make for very interesting watch repair experience especially for those people who don't work on Russian watches.

then when I'm looking at the photos the crown looks a bit worn? This indicates that the watches been run for a while and more than likely has never been serviced.

marking.JPG

Russian watch.JPG

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Some digging on the internet; it could be a 15/16?-jewels ZIM 2602 movement.

269731276_Zim2602.thumb.jpg.ff742d23e520a8307dab59897769df8f.jpg

If so, these two links may be of any help ?

Disassembly: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pOUlt9U7pTo

Assembly: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSAIzr-i3Ek

Add some Pobeda history: http://www.horology.ru/en/articles/pobeda.htm

I'm sure there is much more to find ........ ;)

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1 hour ago, JohnR725 said:

so photographs did attach sort of and I'm reattaching the movement photo so everyone can see it. Then I have a question notice I've zoomed in to the area under the balance wheel? This is a classic location where manufacturers of watch movements tell you which movement it is. So I can see a little writing but I can't see it 100% so if you could look and ell us what's written under their that might be helpful.

 

then I've quoted this because I find it interesting? So if you're not worried about the watch outstanding because usually the first watch you work on has a very high likelihood of undesirable things occurring to it. But you also say it has a sentimental meaning so destroying a sentimental meaning is this going to be a good thing or bad thing for you?

then as already mentioned this is a Russian the watch. Russian watches are interesting they use lots of clever techniques to get around manufacturing issues. This can make for very interesting watch repair experience especially for those people who don't work on Russian watches.

then when I'm looking at the photos the crown looks a bit worn? This indicates that the watches been run for a while and more than likely has never been serviced.

marking.JPG

Russian watch.JPG

Once you did get to the 

 

1 hour ago, JohnR725 said:

so photographs did attach sort of and I'm reattaching the movement photo so everyone can see it. Then I have a question notice I've zoomed in to the area under the balance wheel? This is a classic location where manufacturers of watch movements tell you which movement it is. So I can see a little writing but I can't see it 100% so if you could look and ell us what's written under their that might be helpful.

 

then I've quoted this because I find it interesting? So if you're not worried about the watch outstanding because usually the first watch you work on has a very high likelihood of undesirable things occurring to it. But you also say it has a sentimental meaning so destroying a sentimental meaning is this going to be a good thing or bad thing for you?

then as already mentioned this is a Russian the watch. Russian watches are interesting they use lots of clever techniques to get around manufacturing issues. This can make for very interesting watch repair experience especially for those people who don't work on Russian watches.

then when I'm looking at the photos the crown looks a bit worn? This indicates that the watches been run for a while and more than likely has never been serviced.

marking.JPG

Russian watch.JPG

I have got two movements looking like this,  the calib or the locatin endeavor is talking about says SU then underneath 3NM2602,  only the letter N is upside down, I think its the russian equalent  of the letter H in English.

Regards

 

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Obiously variations of base calib 2602 were marketed.

In case you see large numbers anywhere on it, don,t let that freak you out, thems just give info of year made, even which plant it was made in and how cold the weather was back then. 

Regards

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