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  1. Just noticed that my Accutron which is humming nicely still no longer looks as "golden as it used to". The sides are really worn now and look more like nickel or SS whilst the back which is separate is still in really good condition, this after only about 8 months, though I did wear it continuously for about a month in LA and was hot and sweaty most of the time. I have a couple of 10k Accurton cases and may swap it over. But I would not sell this case on to anyone. I think that the person I bought it from must have used an immersion kit to give it a good but quite temporary shine. I was wondering if anyone has dabbled in home plating. I have a bit of old gold in my drawer so the raw material is there. I believe the solution can be made up by dissolving gold in a Hydrochloric / Nitric acid mix and then you are looking at the transference via a current through the liquid. Has anyone tried this ? Cheers, Vic
  2. Hello Al, It may not be really necessary for you but I recently purchased a long arm stereo microscope and it brought a new dimension into the hobby for me and many things just got easier. If you search through the forums all the posts are there to answer some if not all the questions. In general I was surprised at the field of Vision and workspace even at higher magnitudes. Just something you might consider it definitely takes the strain off working on the small stuff, I can even see the teeth on an Accutron index wheel ! Cheers, Vic
  3. Hello lr1022, The cost of oil is one of the problems that hobbyists have all wrestled with and I spent hours searching the web for small amounts at reasonable prices but regrettably I found a remarkable similarity in pricing from all suppliers of Moebius oils for instance. If you are just practising, a cheap working watch is a worthwhile purchase, strip and clean it then use a cheap generic watch oil when putting it back together. It is hardly worth spending much on oil for a cheap Chinese movement for instance, however, you will still gain the learning experience. If you trawl old postings in the forum you will find good reasons to spend more on oil for treasured watches. I used to try to restrict my interest to just a couple of makes - Accutron and Tissot and only bought the oils for them but over time I weakened and started looking at other movements. You will find guidance on the forum for the subject. Mark has covered the topic for instance and we have an oil specialist who gave quite a detailed post on oil generally. Just put in a search. In conclusion, if the watch you work on is expensive or treasured you probably should use good oil and that I'm afraid comes at a premium. Cheers and welcome, Vich
  4. I love working with stripboard and doing stripboard layouts. Somehow it's more fun that making PCB layouts. The one I'm most proud of is this one, which was part of this project: http://www.stefanv.com/electronics/paia_stringz_n_thingz.html I did two large stripboards for that one and managed to not need a single diagonal wire. Looking at the Accutron supply schematic, I think I would have dispensed with the LM317 and used a Zener diode and voltage divider to feed VR1, and then used an LM358 instead of LM324 for the voltage follower (same op-amps, but only 2 per chip, and only 8 pins, so a lot less unused stuff to work around).
  5. Hello Svorkoetter, Read through the postings with interest. I have just finished the Accutron variable power supply from the drawings by Rich Helzer and Rob Berkavicius (http://members.iinet.net.au/~fotoplot/Modified%20Bulova%209920_6604%20Variable%20Power%20Supply-l.jpg) had to convert it over to stripboard and after a few schoolboy errors it worked, the LM324 was a swine to use on a stripboard - there were more cuts and solder bridges than I care to mention but it works really well and I feel the urge for a new project to keep the brain working. I tried Kello on my iPhone but it was hopeless trying to get the amplification needed, I note your concerns for the software as well. The Korg contact mike with your set up seems to be a good choice even though it is a tad more expensive than DIY. Still loads cheaper than buying a timing machine. Hope you give us the chance to fund your efforts, I don't mind paying for good work and your software looks soundly thought out and what is better it comes down to ease of usage. Not all watch tinkerers are maths experts or programmers but most can get their heads round the instructions for use of a timing machine even if they don't actually understand what is in the box. I look forward to following your progress - really interesting thread ! Cheers, Vic
  6. At 35x I can just about see the teeth on the index wheel of the Bulova Accutron which is just what I needed.
  7. Thats very nice Lee and I feel very tempted. There is a chapter on the accutron watch in "Practical watch repairing" in case you were not aware, which is very interesting. The book is available as a PDF file should you not have it.
  8. Hi Lee, I'm not an authority on anything much less in watches authenticity but it looks like a regular Accutron to me. One thing is certain, it is beautiful and very well preserved! Even if you decide not to get it, I congratulate you for such a nice find! Cheers, Robert
  9. I can remember my father telling me why he never wore rings at work. He was a turbine engineer and obviously working around serious electricity. He said he saw a guy lose two fingers when electricity arced through his rings. I don't know which fingers they were, hopefully he could still make a victory sign or whatever. I am in the process of making a variable power supply for use when testing accutrons. Converting a schematic to use on a linear board - such fun. Luckily someone posted the schematic on an accutron site so here's hoping I get it right. Really interesting post svorkoetter.
  10. I have a feeling that it is going to be special - perhaps guided tours with free watch repairing advice and an inspirational video of the dismantling of a genuine clockwork watch, (Accutron 11ANACB would be outstanding) and on departure a free bottle of Moebius oil - ok it would have to be £50.00 a head but oddly enough a lot of us would probably pay ! Ps I used really BIG tiles and got the floor done quite quickly for me - mainly because the adhesive was the flexible fast drying stuff. Don't forget when you knack up a tile you throw it on the floor swear loudly and continuously and stamp your feet, then turn round and find your wife just about rolling on the floor laughing at you - that's the problem with a 62 year old body with a 10 year old brain.
  11. Hello Adam, Welcome to the forum. I had some experience of problems with local watch repairs when I took an old Tissot my late mother had given me to get it fixed. To cut a long story short I ended up fixing it myself and developed the "Bug". I personally decided to restrict myself to two makes under the mistaken premise that It would be easier to learn about two vintage types, Tissot and Bulova. Little did I know that there are loads of different movements under each brand name and Bulova in particular is a peculiar animal, especially on the Accutron side of things. I do sometimes get caught up in it, and though I have refrained from buying new (old ) watches to make up a collection, the temptation is immense. All the tools are wonderful things and my addiction is to the old tools for Bulova's. I am however happy with my new hobby and I am sure that you will enjoy it. There is nothing quite like a good repair job even if you find yourself cursing while you work. There are some wise heads in the forum that have helped me out. Cheers, Vic
  12. Welcome home Vic, I can see you becoming our resident Accutron specialist! That book was an excellent buy.
  13. Back in Geordieland but after being up and travelling for 33+ hours I am knackered. Bought far too much over there but got it all back unscathed including the boxed Accutron 700 tester. Bought loads of parts in radio shack to make a variable power supply to use in tandem with the tester - hope my brain still works.Also bought an old but mint copy of Practical Watch Repairing for $6.75 dollars (£4.22) so I will now sit in the chair and read it (code for snooze).
  14. Hi, I've decided to take a couple of days vacation this week. After fixing a leaky bathtub faucet (some vacation) I started to work on a 7750 movement that I bought especially to practice on. I've worked on watches from Accutron 214 to Omegas and lots in between but never had enough confidence to tackle a chronograph. Bought this movement non-running. Got it going fairly quickly but as soon as I engaged the chronograph it quit. First question is was there one made that used dial screws to hold dial? The normal eta hooks are nowhere to be found. Movement is marked with eta logo as well as 7750, also a v2 mark(if I am remembering properly). Next question is does the big end of the oscillating pinion go in first- toward the dial? That's the way it was when I removed it but looking at the manual I have it seems to show it going the other way. I tried to put it back the way it was but that didn't go well. Sure won't sit up as nicely as one I saw in the video. Thanks, Charles K
  15. Camra have three festivals in Newcastle. Spring, Summer and Winter but various Wetherspoons have something going on somewhere all the time so I can spend my 50p CAMRA tokens. Our main real ale festival is at Northumbria Uni and is massive - hundreds of beers. I have to say that I have had some good ales at the festivals but also one that tasted a bit like Covonia Cough Medicine - 11.5% and really overhopped to get rid of the sweetness needed for fermenting the beer to get the high proofage. Oddly I usually feel ok the next day but the after effects if you can call them that, due to consumption of lots of yeasty beer give my wife great cause for complaint - I am sure we have all been there, usually without gas masks cos we are real ale supping men. Off to the states soon to pick up a shed load of accutron goodies (including a tester) from EBay.com that I have had sent to my son in LA, will keep up to date on my IPad hopefully. Cheers Chaps
  16. Hello Folks, I will have to broach the problems about the pawl finger and index finger at some stage but perhaps not quite yet. I have a 400x USB scope that allows me to look at them but I don't feel confident yet. The Accutron 214 and 218 service manuals are in the public domain so I expect that someone has uploaded them by now. Made my last purchase of spare parts today and eagerly await the booty to inspect. My son is amassing the items, parts and watches, I have bought in the USA and I wiil bring the stuff back with me. Thanks for the warm welcome, Vich
  17. Welcome Vich to the forums, Nice intro, and as Geo mentioned the Bulova accutron has an extremely delicate drive mechanism which I believe can only be seen or adjusted under a microscope, so be very careful. Watches can become addictive so keep a close eye on expenditure as it can easily run amok.
  18. Geo

    My Trio

    Hi Vich, that' a nice set of watches you've got there, I particularly like the Glycine! That is a well written introduction. You will find this forum friendly and most informative. It will be interesting to see if you can continue to limit your spend, I set out parameters in the beginning but these soon got blown out of the water! I don't know why, but it's is a very addictive business. You must keep us informed with the progress of your Accutron projects. I have a nice one myself, but it is one type of movement I will not interfere with due to the incredible sensitivity of the driving pallets.
  19. There cannot be too many working Bulova Accutrons around these days, so well worth keeping. Should you be interested there is a chapter on the Accutron in Donald de Carle's FBHI book "Practical watch repairing" with lots of information about them.
  20. I thought I would post a shot of my entire collection of watches and pocket watches. The picture is not great but hopefully it conveys what my ethos on collecting watches is which is diversity. I love all forms of horology and can get as passionate about my humble Timex easy reader as I can about my Air King for they all mean something different to me. I hope you like the watches and if you want to see better shots of any then let me know and I will post better pictures on this thread. So! Top row are: John Forrest Lever Fusee Sterling silver pocket watch made in 1894, Next to it an Omega Canadian market pocket watch in Nickel silver made in 1916 Main row left to right are: Archer Watches Sterling ( Hand made in Canada) Timex Easy Reader Bulova Accutron (1971) Rolex Air King (114200) Birks ( Canadian equivalent of Tiffany's or Mappin & Web) branded Fortis Manual wind (circa 1970's) Cathode Corner Nixie watch (As worn by Steve Wozniak of Apple Computers fame) Sekonda manual wind (made in the Poljot #1 factory Moscow late 1970's) Cartier Tank (mid 1970's) Bulova American Clipper (1937) Election Chronometer (Mid 1930's) And last but not least, Casio G shock mudman. Hope you like my humble collection. I get a huge amount of satisfaction wearing all of them and new or old they all get lots of wrist or pocket time! Thanks for looking.
  21. I have been on a bit of a roll of late with watches. In truth this past couple of months purchases equal what I have purchased in the last ten years! But you know what its like. We all have wish list watches that one day we hope to own it just so happens all but one of my wish list have all come up this past couple of months and all at prices I have felt comfortable spending. I can't believe this but I now have five watches winging their way to me including the one I won today which is coming from my old home country, the UK! I have an Accutron but have always loved where Omega and the other Swiss makes took that movement to and have wanted one for a long time. Yesterday I spied a mint Omega Geneve in gold plate with gold dial, barely a mark on the case and dial and hands as fresh as they day they left the factory in 1972. Add to that the movement has just been freshly serviced by someone with experience on working with these and that the seller included a new Omega calf band and gold tone buckle and you end up with a really lovely example that has plenty of life in it and is looking cosmetically great as well. I won't say what I won it for but suffice to say if I was that sort I could probably turn it around tomorrow an make a couple of hundred on it but this is a keeper! Here are a couple of pictures from the seller, more to come once it arrives! So there is this one on the way as well as a mint Seiko Lassale, The Fellow Chronograph, The Timex easy reader, The other Timex electric arrived this week so its going to seem like Christmas in the next couple of weeks!
  22. nice... however, for an accutron, I have one but Bulova is not working since many years and I don't know what the problem and a oiece is missing. so i'm not hurray lol.. okay i'm gone :D
  23. nice omega..I have a bulova accutron that does not work but one day... may be
  24. Hello everyone. Just introducing myself here and will post a picture of what I am wearing in the other section in a moment. Like many I bet I came here via Marks wonderful youtube channel which I love watching. I am British (grew up in Dawlish) but have lived in Vancouver Canada for the past 15 years though I am planning to return to live in Europe or the UK later this year. I have been fascinated by Horology since a nipper. My first watch was a wind up Timex given to me a a bribe by my older brother to be a paige boy at his wedding! :) The bug bit and bit hard. I was fascinated by the ticking sounds and how all those gears and springs could make something tell the time! Through the years I have owned all sorts of watches both mechanical and quartz. I have a fascination with HEQ Quartz watches and though I am currently selling it own one of the high accuracy Breitlings. My collection now is drifting more toward vintage which is why the Breitling is going. I am after a vintage gold Rolex from the Thirties which will be the top of the tree for me as far as my collecting goes. What I have currently is as follows.. Wristwatches.. Rolex Air King 114200 with silver dial ( I have gone through several modern Rolex but ended up with this one as it is understated and very comfortable to wear.) Archer Sterling. This is a beautiful hand made watch made by an excellent watchmaker here in Canada. Al the owner combines the ETA 6498 movement with a German made stainless case. This particular model has a Sterling silver dial (hence the name) heat blued hands and a lovely german calf strap. Al gets the high grade version of the movement from ETA then strips each one down and cleans it and lubricates it. Then regulates it to well within COSC standards. The whole watch is beautifully put together and feels so comfortable to wear. Bulova American Clipper (from 1937) Bulova Accutron (1970) Election Chronometer (mid 1930's) Sekonda manual wind ( I found this on eBay. It replaces the exact same model that was given to me for my 18th birthday which gave up the ghost many years ago!) Timex easy reader ( just a classic, simple quartz Timex and harks back to my very first watch!) Casio GShock Mudman. Pocket Watches.. 1916 Omega with a Regina movement made specially for the Canadian market. The movement though having a Regina name was in fact made by Omega and used I believe elusively for the Canadian market. What is unusual with mine is the Omega dial. Most that were sold either had the Regina name on the dial or the name of the jeweller who sold the watch. John Forrest Fusee. I am excited about this one, I have wanted an English watch for so long! Made in 1894, it should be here any day now . It is fully serviced and ready to go with only a few minor things that make it not perfect. I have to source an inner glass for it (it is a Sterling silver full hunter). The latch spring does not work and there is a chip on the sub dial. I got the watch though at an exceptional price and knowing all these issues. More important to me is that it has been fully serviced and even carries a one year guarantee on that which is great! It is a beast of a watch with a diameter of 56mm and 17mm depth. All original and matching case and movement numbers. So that is my current collection. I love every piece and have tried to have a diverse collection to suit my moods! Thanks so much for having me here and I look forward to participating more. All the best. Ian
  25. Another fine watch, America used to make quite a few, such as the Bulova Accutron, which was very advanced for it's time. RogerC
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