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Found 15 results

  1. Just getting started with watch repair and am already hooked. I set aside a table in my house to keep my supplies in and use. Hopefully, I will learn some stuff here.
  2. Hi all. I'm absolutely brand new to the world of mechanical watches, but have always been fascinated by the way they functioned. So, I took my first step into them, getting myself a cheap, crappy ebay mechanical watch with a chinese movement. I knew that by all accounts this would be a rubbish movement and mechanism, however I wanted something that I could take a look at without risking any sort of investment, gauge my interest in the hobby etc. However, after receiving it, one of my friends let me know that he had a near identical cheap watch that was broken, and offered me to have a look at it as practice. I agreed, and have spent the last few days doing research and taking it apart, before putting it back together again. I've managed to learn quite a lot from it, however I've found that when putting it back together again, the pole of the escape wheel that keeps it in place either end seems to be too short, as though something had broken off. This means the wheel is sat basically loose and wont reach the crystals at either side to keep it in place while it spins. I see no way to fix this, so i intended to get a new wheel to replace it with, however I can't find the name of this type of movement anywhere. It is the kind used in this: ( https://www.amazon.co.uk/Jechin-Skeleton-Hand-Wind-Leather-Mechanical/dp/B00VPRZC50/ref=asc_df_B00VPRZC50/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=290896788181&hvpos=1o3&hvnetw=g&hvrand=13027367026987882679&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9047006&hvtargid=aud-545868369748:pla-468442151749&psc=1 ) . If I really wanted to I think I could just order one of the other watches that I've found that use this movement for £5-6, however I was hoping I might be able to keep to my strict student budget and get just the escape wheel somewhere. Does anyone know where I'd be able to find something like that? p.s. Apologies for the lack of knowledge on the subject, I know I'll come across a bit new to the whole thing, but trying to learn as I go
  3. I grew up next to a clock maker and repair man who's business was the largest in Chicagoland area. Seeing the movements and tools and the time consuming precise work amazed me as a child, my love for clocks turned to watches in High School when after saving what seemed forever to buy an Oris TT1 Chronograph because it "looked cool" my horologist neighbor took the ETA/Valjoux 7750 movement out to clean and oil 6 years afterwards, showing me how things worked and that was it. Hooked. Funny how this watch is the least impressive brand wise, movement wise in my collection years later and yet there's not a timepiece on earth I'd trade it for, to me there isn't anything more interesting than time movements and the folks who enjoy viewing them or collecting them.
  4. Pen

    Hi

    Hi Guys Pen here, New member Cool site full of really good info Glad to join you
  5. Just starting a watch collection. Mostly hand-me-downs at the moment. Looking for advice, repair help and parts. Cheers
  6. Hello All My name is Paul and I have an illness, an addiction...watches! I started collecting last year really, but, this year I have started buying watches that are not working so I can fix them. I am looking forward to gaining knowledge and hopefully some 'watch buddies' along the way. Thanks for letting me join Mark. Regards Paul
  7. Hi everybody. New to the fascinating world of horology and just bought my 1st semi decent watch. ....a seagull . An avid watcher of the YouTube watch channels and blown away by the skills in the creation of timepieces. Got here by following the links on Marks repair of a Breitling that was rusted and hope to learn more about watches in general. Just a new fan to this amazing theme of creation of mechanical movements and soak up all the history of it in general. Colin.
  8. My name is Dave, Love collecting watches and am a avid hobbyist at watch repair. Love watching Mark's Videos and gaining all the info that i can.
  9. Hello to all of you out there! So, the moderator asked me to do some intros to myself. Here they are. I'm just getting properly into watch repairs and slowly building my kit and various bags of to-be-fixed watches. So far, I'm sticking to quartz watches. Actually I have a few books on repairing mechanical watches, but it is scary stuff! Maybe I just need to explore more. I'm certainly NOT a pro, but a home-repairing amateur. I have fixed quite a few already, but also killed some watches in the process. Hey, that's part of learning - right? So, I guess that's all for now.
  10. Just thought I'd say hi, Private watch collector in need of watch repairs in the UK
  11. Hi All, I'm a watch technician at a local watch repair shop here in San Francisco. I look forward to seeing what this forum has to offer.
  12. Hello all, I reside in Holland, but originate from London. Hit my mid 40's and became a watch-nut - go figure? I think the main reason is that, as hobbies go, Horology can be hidden nicely away from my wife's eye's. She currently thinks I am saving up for an Omega Seamaster - and doesn't realise it is already stashed safely away in my watch box! Happy days!!! Regards, Dutch.
  13. (sunny it is, even in February, though its a bit chilly this AM, just under 0 centigrade...) Hi, I am Tom, and I live in South Carolina, USA, and after years of dabbling about with watches, the bug has finally bit in earnest. By background, I have been many things...I worked in the printing industry to start with, then went back and got degrees in business education, then I taught US History at the high school level for a few years, and have worked mostly as an IT person since then. Now, I run my own little IT consulting business and do work mostly for private non-profit organizations here in the state capitol, Columbia. Interspersed with all of that, I also worked as a licensed gunsmith specializing in centerfire long range target rifles and was a competitive shooter, and became a pretty fair machinist, doing a lot of custom barrel and chambering work. I will probably be cranking that operation back up fairly soon... The watch thing started with two watches I inherited from my uncle via my father...the first was his Bulova A-11 that was issued to him back in World War 2, when he flew B-17s out of England. I got this one perhaps 25 years ago and had it professionally serviced at the time. I will probably go into it for another service sometimes soon when I get better at this stuff. Then, just this year, from my fathers estate I received my uncles 1940s vintage Longens, a simply beautiful old watch. I also have my father's Bulova Accutron Railroad Approved (he was a railroad man for 36 years) that is due for a major overhaul...alas, his Hamilton 992B was stolen by a disreputable coworker on the job, which lead to his buying the Accutron in the early '70s... So, now I want to learn to work on these things, and being fairly methodical about this sort of operation, decided to standardise on just a few movements at first, ones that I can get plenty of cheap parts and donors to go with. Owning and liking several of the Vostok Amphibias and Kommanderskes, and spying that I can get a seemingly limitless supply of parts and scrap movements out of Russia and the Ukraine on eBay, I bought up a basic set of tools, some fifty 2409, 2416, 2209 and 2214 movements out of Kiev for about $1.50 each, and started buying up Vostok watches in various states of disrepair to match. I am not much of a watchmaker at this point, but I am having fun! Thanks; -Tom
  14. Hi Everyone! Newbie here. My name is Ross and I live in Oshawa, Ontario, Canada. My experience with watches extends to changing the batteries in my and my families watches, shortening up watch bands and that's about it. I've ordered and received a bunch of starter tools to begin my exploration of watch repair and I look forward to being able to tap this huge resource that everyone is kind enough to share. It's wonderful that people choose to share their knowledge with us newbies and I wish I could reciprocate. I'm an electronics technician, some forty years at that, currently working in industrial wire marker printer repair. Thanks to everyone for sharing! Rossco
  15. Greetings everyone, my name is Todd Godfrey. i own a small family run jewelry shop in North Carolina. My dad taught me how to do a certain degree of watch repair but since I am in charge of running a store I cannot spend as much time as I would like at the watch bench. I am a huge Anglofile and look forward to meeting you all over time. Thanks very much indeed Todd
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