CKelly

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CKelly last won the day on July 27 2015

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About CKelly

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    WRT Addict
  • Birthday 09/03/1953

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    Male
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    North Carolina

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  1. Accutron 218

    Hi again, You may notice that once the spring for the date jumper is in place the date ring moves. I just let it and center it up after I have the date ring guard in position with one screw loosely in place. This means there is less tension on the spring and it is less likely to run off. My technique anyway.
  2. Accutron 218

    Hi, Since RYMoeller mentioned it they did change the both of the spring for the date. I am posting some pictures I took especially today just to show how the date goes back together. I took pictures of two springs. The date jumper spring was later changed so that the little hook was removed and you could install it after the date ring late was in place. The spring could still get away but was much easier. The bigger date spring was changer so that it could be installed onto the main plate instead of the date ring plate. As you can maybe tell in the pictures with this model you place the date jumper spring then try to mount the date ring without either spring moving. Once you get the date ring plate positioned you then have to adjust the date spring so that it is positioned properly. That's what I meant by baiting a cocked mouse trap.
  3. Hi all, It's been a while since I posted anything here but tonight I was working on a watch and I thought there might be some interest in looking at it. The customer said the second hand would move but the hour and minute hands wouldn't. Usually that means the minute wheel assembly has became worn however today that part had became seized onto the center tube. Anyway I took a picture of what is under the dial of a 218 in case there was any interest. Notice the three springs that are laying about. The first time I tried working on one of these I lost every one of those things and maybe some of the other parts as well. I told my wife it was like trying to bait a mouse trap after you had already cocked it. Anyway I have this watch going now and here's what it looked like before. Charles K
  4. Wakmann I just bought

    Hi again, When I read oldhippys' post I just couldn't believe how the one gasket could have failed and made such a mess. When I cleaned out the watch case I saw the goop was not where the gasket should have even been. There was pitch up under the case back, on the movement ring and it had oozed up under the dial. I guess the gasket could have basically melted. Didn't think of that.
  5. Wakmann I just bought

    Hi, Just wanted to say that I did some research on this watch and found it could have been assembled by Chas Gigandet which is how the movement is marked. Did see some others similarly marked so I assume it is correct. By the way the movement is a valjoux 236 and is now running very well. When I checked after installing the balance my timeograph read +4 seconds. I know people sometimes use that sealant to repair a failed gasket but it gets everywhere and takes a while to clean out. I found it up under the dial and about everywhere it could get. The replacement gasket was maybe a $1.00 or less. Had to buy 3. Anyway balance came in this past Saturday and watch is now running well. Just looking for a nice 22mm band now.
  6. Hi all, It's been a while since I posted anything, I retired a year ago and have been busy working on our house and keeping busy with watches but haven't really had anything worth sharing until this week. Anyway I put an ad in the local paper looking to drum up a little business or maybe even buy some interesting watches. Yesterday I bought a box of assorted watches. Got two 18s Elgin pocket watches, one accutron, a handful of other watches and this Wakmann. As soon as I saw it I knew I was going to have it. I offered the guy who owned them $300 for the lot and he said $350 and I said Ok. The Wakmann doesn't run yet because the hairspring looks like a birds nest. I know Mark has a video about how to straighten out hairsprings and I have done a few but this is beyond me so I have ordered a balance complete from Jules Borel at what I thought was a very reasonable price. Hope you enjoy the pictures. I did take a close up of the movement ring because it looks as if someone used tar as a seal. I have put the movement back in the case just to show what the watch should look like when it's finished. Also see the tangled hairspring. I'm not sure what happened but the regulator arm was pushed into the center wheel so I'm guessing the wheel caught it.
  7. Hi, You are right about parting out the watch. I just convinced my son-in-law of that so that's what we will do. Probably just put parts ebay and see what happens. Thanks, Charles K
  8. Hi, Thanks to all the replies. I did see the movement on ebay and have made an offer, we'll see what happens there. I can source a balance staff and jewel from Jules Borel. (Problem with the Jules Borel staff is there are several different staffs for different size hairspring collets). They do have a balance complete though. I had already stripped down the balance cock jewel assembly trying to get the broken pivot out, didn't work. Put it back together just for the picture. Maybe I'll try again while waiting on other parts. My son-in-law picked up the watch for $80.00 so it is a good project. There is a local person who might have parts as well. Thanks, Charles K
  9. Hi all, I have came across a movement that I'm having a bit of trouble identifying. Markings on it are Rolex. It came in a Rolex case model 4127 which my research indicates to be a Rolex Athlete model. Not very familiar with that particular version of Rolex. I have found that the movement used in that model was normally the 710 caliber but when I compare a picture of that movement to the one I have I see some difference. First off there are extra holes in the balance cock where it looks like a swan neck went? The stud holder has a cover to keep the stud in place instead of the normal screw that I see on other examples of the 710. It almost looks like the movement should be something like a Rolex 630 or 645 missing the automatic wind mechanism. The movement did fit perfectly in the case. The watch had a Rolex oyster perpetual dial however the feet had been removed and dial was glued to movement. The watch has a broken balance staff and the pivot is stuck in the upper jewel. I have tried getting it out with rodico but that hasn't worked. I reattached the balance cock for the pictures. Watch also has a slightly bent hairspring so that the outer coil will hit on the center wheel. Anyway before I can source parts I need to be sure of exactly what movement I have found. Any help would be surely appreciated. Thanks, Charles K
  10. Valjoux 72

    The hour recording mechanism was actually pretty easy to deal with. Several springs but they didn't want to jump away. I did have an issue with one of those parts though. If you look at the third picture you will see that there is a part that pivots to engage the hour recording wheel itself. Underneath the right side there is a shaft that extends through the movement and is allowed to move when the chronograph is activated. This shaft was bent and hit on the side of the hole in the mainplate and would prevent the wheels from meshing so the hour wheel would not run. I of course didn't think to check on that before putting watch back together and had to take the dial off and figure out what was wrong. When I was researching the watch I saw were one like it sold on ebay about two weeks ago for about $3700. It's a pretty nice watch but I didn't understand that bidding. I see where I messed up the name earlier-I'm bad about that sort of thing. Watch is a Jardur instead of Jardue. As I've gotten older I think my fingers have gotten fatter.
  11. I recently serviced this Jardue with a valjoux 72 movement. I had intended to take more pictures but watch was in very bad shape and I got involved in repair a bit more than I thought I would. Watch did not run at all when I first got it but with a bit of manipulating I got it going except for when I engaged the chronograph. There were several things wrong with the watch. It had been serviced before by someone who thought that the more oil you use the better, it was soaking. Then the trigger for the hour recorder was bent, the hour recorder hand was floating around in the movement and the chronograph coupling clutch was hitting on the pillar wheel which prevented it from engaging chronograph runner wheel properly. By that I mean that when you engaged the chronograph the clutch would hit on the edge of the pillar wheel which prevented it from touching the eccentric next to its mounted wheel. Anyway I thought I would post what pictures I did take in case they could be of use to anyone. Watch is running now after a service and keeping good time. One thing that I enjoyed about this watch is the chronograph plate itself. It is engraved "Pilgrim Electric" I'm still trying to find where battery goes. Maybe it took a drop cord.
  12. Rolex upper Bridge cal.1570

    Hi, I'm guessing that if the jewel is really loose in the bridge that the wrong jewel may have been inserted in an earlier repair. There are two jewels used to stabilize the rotor, an upper and a lower. I replaced one recently and they aren't too pricey. If the upper jewel isn't falling out of the bridge it may be that it is just worn on the inner diameter. In any event a replacement is called for. Now if you get the replacement jewel in and it is loose in the bridge then the bridge itself may have been damaged. Charles K
  13. tighten a canon pinion?

    Hi, I agree if watch is keeping time the canon pinion is fine however yesterday I ran into this servicing an Old Waltham and thought you all might be interested in seeing a really worn out canon pinion. Amazingly enough watch still keeps time.
  14. Elgin with a puzzling case

    Hi, I believe the lever set movement was required by the railroads for fear that a person might change the time while winding a pendant set movement. To set the time on a lever set you have to remove the front bezel, pull the lever then set the time. I just saw a listing of railroad requirements stating jewel count, and time keeping ability and so on but for the life of me I can't remember where.
  15. Hi, Recently I posted a question about an issue I was having opening the case of this watch. As I was servicing it today I took a bunch of pictures of the tear down so people could see how the lever set watch is different from the regular pendant set. The last picture is a bit fuzzy but it just shows where I removed three jewels.