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Help identifying this watch tool please

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I got a nice surprise gift in the post from my aunt which she found at an auction, labelled "watchmaker's tool". Certainly looks attractive but I'm not sure what it is! My instinct is a staking set but as I've never seen or used one, I could be wrong, and my image searches don't throw up anything similar.

Suggestions on another forum included a hole punch for watch straps or a sizing tool for jewels or caps. Can anyone help with the answer?

watch-tool.jpg

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1 hour ago, oldhippy said:

This is a new one on me.

Well when I said old tool, here's a internet copy of a 1899 watchmakers suppliers catalogue similar tools appear on page 102 of the catalogue they may have at the time forgot to add your name to there mailing list :D.

https://archive.org/details/20thcenturycatal00purd

It does make interesting reading as a catalogue thats over 100 years old there are some very familiar old tools listed.

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13 hours ago, wls1971 said:

Well when I said old tool, here's a internet copy of a 1899 watchmakers suppliers catalogue similar tools appear on page 102 of the catalogue they may have at the time forgot to add your name to there mailing list :D.

https://archive.org/details/20thcenturycatal00purd

It does make interesting reading as a catalogue thats over 100 years old there are some very familiar old tools listed.

Wow, great find indeed - that's exactly the tool! I don't know how you found that and even the exact page, but the whole catalogue is interesting. Think I might order one of those solid walnut benches on page 10 for $21! :biggrin:

Thanks very much for solving this mystery - and for the bonus reading material.

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