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Hello!

So after tinkering with watches I thought I gave it a try with a clock. How hard can it be ;)? First of all you don't need magnifiers :) Actually you need to take a step back to see the entire thing.

Basic questions, if I may: what do you use to oil these beasts? How do you take out and put back the mainspring?

Some photos:

 

IMG_3753.JPGIMG_3770.JPG

Thank you,

Bogdan

Edited by matabog

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You can remove the mainsprings by hand BUT be very careful them springs can do a lot of damage to you & the clock if they get away. RE-fitting is very difficult by hand. I highly recommend a proper clock spring winder. I use the same machine as in the demo vid below. Notice even with the correct machine they guy uses thick gloves. I use moebuis 8030 which is for small to average size clocks. Looking at your pics the pivots look Ok but check the pivot holes for wear. If significant wear they will need re-bushing.

 

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I always used windles clock oil. Its one of the better oils and can be used with most movements including Long case clocks. You need a clock mainspring winder, I used a boxwood mallet, hit the back of the winding arbor and the cap will come off, then use the mainspring winder to take out the spring. You can get the cap off by putting a screwdriver in the slot of these barrels, not all clock barrels have slots, you can take the spring out by hand but you will distort it, the same for putting it back, but it is not recommended because when you come to wind the spring up you will get an irregular unwind and it can effect the time keeping. 

What you have is an 8 day ting tan movement sometimes called bim bam, I can tell by the three hammers, and it has an anchor escapement .      

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I am a hobbyist mainly interested in watches, not clocks. This one is just for fun. I wish a I had the means for re-bushing, though I believe this is not the case. I wish I had a winder, but I don't, so I think I will clean the barrel arbors only (naphta and Rodico). The mainsprings don't look too dirty.

I have another problem though - during the disassembly, one of the click-springs broke. Do I need to replace it or can I put a resort spring instead (between the hole in the main plate and an eventually future hole in the click)?

Or is that a BLASPHEMY?
 

IMG_3783_1.jpg

 

Thank you,

Bogdan

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I see by your photo you could have taken out the barrels without taking the whole movement apart. That type of click spring should be available from good clock part suppliers. If you decide to make and adapt a part just make sure it is strong enough to work and hold the click without too much give because if it slipped while winding it will damage the hand of the person that is winding it, broken fingers come to mind. Put a little grease around the click and don't forget to oil the springs and arbors, a little oil in the privet holes, anywhere that to metals meet and touch, a little on the face of the pallets is a must.   

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oil, oil, oil... I am used to and know the oil for a wrist watch. I don't know them for clocks - clockboy said something about 8030 - I suppose it is ok for the train eheel pivots. Is it also ok to use on the mainspring and pallets? It seems unlikely.

 

Anyway, I just bit the bullet and cleaned the mainsprings. I just took them out and put them back by hand - that was a workout, I'm still shaking a bit :) I cleaned them with a piece of cotton with naphta on it. They look much better now. I just need to oil them now - I suppose it is like for the watch mainsprings - just put four drops of oil  on the MS and two on the top and bottom of the barrel - but again, what type of oil?

Also, I am still thinking about the click spring solution.

Bogdan

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2 hours ago, vinn3 said:

wall clock oil [for those that don't have jewels] :  since the pivots are "metal  on metal"    i see no problem by using multi viscosity motor oil there.   vinn

I hope you are not serious.

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