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Don

Slow Day at the Office - Rolex Bubbleback

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So I ran out of work a little early today and was browsing around the watch listings on eBay. I found this gorgeous little Rolex Bubbleback 3130. I couldn't quite make out all the inscription on the back and being bored and being a curious person I spent some time trying to find out who it had belonged to. It turns out that it was owned by  Clarence Vincent Conlan (March 10, 1898 - August 23, 1975). He was a career Navy man who graduated from the Naval Academy in 1921 and won the Navy Cross (the second-highest military honor in the United States). He retired with the rank of Rear Admiral. As noted in the inscription, he was the last commander of the USS Monocacy (PG-20). Now if only I could afford the watch...

Edited by Don
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1 hour ago, Don said:

So I ran out of work a little early today and was browsing around the watch listings on eBay. I found this gorgeous little Rolex Bubbleback 3130. I couldn't quite make out all the inscription on the back and being bored and being a curious person I spent some time trying to find out who it had belonged to. It turns out that it was owned by  Clarence Vincent Conlan (March 10, 1898 - August 23, 1975). He was a career Navy man who graduated from the Naval Academy in 1921 and won the Navy Cross (the second-highest military honor in the United States). He retired with the rank of Rear Admiral. As noted in the inscription, he was the last commander of the USS Monocacy (PG-20). Now if only I could afford the watch...

You're right, it's a gorgeous watch. But the seller doesn't include any pictures of the movement, nor do they give any information on size. For three thousands bucks, a picture of the movement is an absolute must.

JC

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I'm not a fan of modern Rolex, but the early ones, especially bubble backs, are magnificent.  Unlike a lot of folk, I quite like a watch that has been engraved.  There is something nice about knowing it has been such a special part of someone's life.  I would love to own this particular watch.

Joe, the seller has done their best to let you see the workings of the watch without removing the auto-wind mechanism.  It looks in good condition to me, with no chewed screws.  Would I buy it...........you bet I would!

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5 hours ago, Geo said:

I'm not a fan of modern Rolex, but the early ones, especially bubble backs, are magnificent.  Unlike a lot of folk, I quite like a watch that has been engraved.  There is something nice about knowing it has been such a special part of someone's life.  I would love to own this particular watch.

Joe, the seller has done their best to let you see the workings of the watch without removing the auto-wind mechanism.  It looks in good condition to me, with no chewed screws.  Would I buy it...........you bet I would!

I'm not a Rolex fan either...but these oldies are so nice an uncluttered. Yes I see now that the caseback HAS been removed. It looks great even with the one screw for the rotor missing. If it were for auction, would I place a bid? Maybe!

JC

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6 hours ago, Geo said:

I'm not a fan of modern Rolex, but the early ones, especially bubble backs, are magnificent.  Unlike a lot of folk, I quite like a watch that has been engraved.  There is something nice about knowing it has been such a special part of someone's life.  I would love to own this particular watch.

Joe, the seller has done their best to let you see the workings of the watch without removing the auto-wind mechanism.  It looks in good condition to me, with no chewed screws.  Would I buy it...........you bet I would!

I agree about the engraving. I like old watches and even more if there's a history behind them.

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On June 9, 2016 at 4:36 PM, Don said:

So I ran out of work a little early today and was browsing around the watch listings on eBay. I found this gorgeous little Rolex Bubbleback 3130. I couldn't quite make out all the inscription on the back and being bored and being a curious person I spent some time trying to find out who it had belonged to. It turns out that it was owned by  Clarence Vincent Conlan (March 10, 1898 - August 23, 1975). He was a career Navy man who graduated from the Naval Academy in 1921 and won the Navy Cross (the second-highest military honor in the United States). He retired with the rank of Rear Admiral. As noted in the inscription, he was the last commander of the USS Monocacy (PG-20). Now if only I could afford the watch...

I love watches with personal inscriptions on the back.  I find myself often Googling the person cited to try and learn a little more of their story and that of the timepiece.  I know they aren't popular with collectors but to me it's an added value; I'd rather hold in my hand a watch with history than an unloved piece which lived in a drawer.

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