Jump to content

This is how I sharpen pegwood


Recommended Posts

I have never enjoyed sharpening pegwood. I get wood chips all over the bench, floor, clothes and places you never even imagined.

I recently found a mechanical pencil from my secondary school days. These dinosaurs use 2.0mm leads, which set me thinking.... Can I put a toothpick into it and stick it into my pencil sharpener to sharpen it?

This is what I got.

20230501_085608.thumb.jpg.676058b9ef73f68d6538ce732a1e20cb.jpg

20230501_085658.thumb.jpg.ac833f63341386a5579335568af7dbba.jpg

20230501_085721.thumb.jpg.07ed2633831bfeb3185a576b110a8a31.jpg

I just discovered that AliExpress still sells these antiques. I ordered a 3.0mm version for my pegwood.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I sometimes use an ordinary pencil sharpener to get a rough tip, but then to get the tip fine enough to go through small jewel holes, I have to work under the microscope with a sharp blade. Often it breaks off at the first use, then I have to do it again, and again. I hate pegging holes 😟

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/1/2023 at 3:41 AM, HectorLooi said:

I have never enjoyed sharpening pegwood.

On 5/1/2023 at 10:56 AM, mikepilk said:

hate pegging holes 😟

Amen to that!

If someone could come up with a device or a method that could sharpen peg wood quickly and easily to the point it could be used to peg pallet fork bridge jewels I'd be willing to pay good money for it. It's such a PITA 🙁

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, VWatchie said:

Amen to that!

If someone could come up with a device or a method that could sharpen peg wood quickly and easily to the point it could be used to peg pallet fork bridge jewels I'd be willing to pay good money for it. It's such a PITA 🙁

I've just been doing that exact job this morning - pegging pallet and escape wheel holes 😟

Just getting the tip sharp enough to go in the pallet hole is difficult, then it immediately breaks, and start again  argghh

  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK this may be a crazzzzzzy idea.... but what about if you used a fiber to 'peg' the jewel hole instead of wood, a scaled down version of something like this:

image.thumb.png.517692784d4f744984ef68fde5f4bbb5.png

 

Obviously the fiber would have to be selected not to leave behind fibers, and the 'needle' small enough to pass through the jewel hole (not sure how feasible this bit is), but I bet it would do a better job of cleaning? Just run it through then use it like flossing your teeth.... hey there's a thought dental floss!!!

Thoughts?

Could use something like a sim changer below tool to poke through the 'dental floss' the floss the hole ???

image.thumb.png.5b17c349d8c0972d1d74b6d7034b93f8.png

WatchFloss©

haha

🤣

Edited by Waggy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Waggy said:

and the 'needle' small enough to pass through the jewel hole (not sure how feasible this bit is), 

Thoughts?

Escape wheel, pallet pivots must be about 0.1-0.2 mm?  What could you find small enough to go though that ?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

56 minutes ago, markr said:

Wait. Now I have to lie to two people when they ask if I floss regularly.

You can lie all you want but as a dentist, we can tell whether you floss or not. When we ask whether you floss regularly, it's rhetorical. 

  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, mikepilk said:

Escape wheel, pallet pivots must be about 0.1-0.2 mm?  What could you find small enough to go though that ?

Typical wristwatch escape wheel pivot is around 0.1mm, similar or smaller for pallet fork. Definitely too small for a needle and thread, and too small for machine sharpened peg wood. I use a standard snap-off cutter, but use the extra sharp NT Black blades- really makes a difference on peg wood. Also, different pieces of peg wood even from the same batch sharpen up differently. I have old stock peg wood and new stuff from Horotec, some pieces are great, some so-so, no real difference between the 30yo stuff or new.

 

 

nt black blades.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, mikepilk said:

Escape wheel, pallet pivots must be about 0.1-0.2 mm?  What could you find small enough to go though that ?

The smallest needles i use and can find are acupuncture needles at 0.18mm thats going to be around double the diameter of an average WW balance or escape wheel pivot with a jewel bearing hole a hundredth maybe 2 bigger. Possibly go through a big pocket watch pivot hole but there is no eye for threading. Yep definitely flogging a dead os, good thinking outside of the box though.🙂

7 hours ago, HectorLooi said:

You can lie all you want but as a dentist, we can tell whether you floss or not. When we ask whether you floss regularly, it's rhetorical. 

My dentist once asked if I'd be ok to have some work done without any  anesthetic to which i agreed. He said if i started to feel any pain just to raise my hand, i said no problem i shall raise it to just underneath your throat. 🙂

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have another crazzzzzzy idea.

What about using cactus thorns?

I've been going to garden supplies and looking at cacti. But I guess we don't get many varieties here in Singapore. Any one living near a desert? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

56 minutes ago, HectorLooi said:

I have another crazzzzzzy idea.

What about using cactus thorns?

I've been going to garden supplies and looking at cacti. But I guess we don't get many varieties here in Singapore. Any one living near a desert? 

We have cacti in Texas

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, HectorLooi said:

I have another crazzzzzzy idea.

What about using cactus thorns?

I've been going to garden supplies and looking at cacti. But I guess we don't get many varieties here in Singapore. Any one living near a desert? 

A beard whisker is about the right size to poke through a jewel hole. Organic and low carbon footprint. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Was thinking about fishing 2 lb mono-filament or copper winding wire 0.1mm

I did look at guitar wire, but the thinnest I could fine was high E of 0.008" = 0.203 mm, so not a good candidate

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/4/2023 at 3:04 PM, nickelsilver said:

I use a standard snap-off cutter, but use the extra sharp NT Black blades- really makes a difference on peg wood.

I think we'll just have to accept that a really sharp blade is the quickest and easiest way to sharpen peg wood for those < 0.1mm pallet staff jewel holes and chaton holes.

So, I just ordered these blades (same as in the picture) and a cutter for them on eBay from Japan. I'll try to remember to report back to this thread once I've tried it (delivery is 1 to 2 months)...

eBay item numbers: 254266416996 and 254262491217

 

Edited by VWatchie
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 5/4/2023 at 8:15 PM, HectorLooi said:

I have another crazzzzzzy idea.

@HectorLooi, being that you are a dentist, I'm actually shocked you haven't thought of this already... a WaterPik!  What could possibly go wrong?  🤣

 

In all seriousness though, I thought the whole point (pardon the pun) of pegwood was to have something uneven to help clean out the holes.  If you used a pencil sharpener and it was all uniform in shape, you sort of take that away.  I think using a knife, scalpel, switchblade, machete,  etc is really the only way that you will get that.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did try using a pressure jetting method of cleaning. I used a vintage glass syringe, as I didn't want to put any cleaning solution in my waterpik. But the results were not good. It cannot remove dried up oils.

And for those who think the waterpik is the answer to flossing, it isn't. The waterpik can only remove loose food particles. It can't remove plaque, it can't remove food particles pinched in the contact area of the teeth

4 hours ago, kd8tzc said:

I thought the whole point (pardon the pun) of pegwood was to have something uneven to help clean out the holes.  If you used a pencil sharpener and it was all uniform in shape, you sort of take that away.

I was taught that too. But when I thought about it, with the pressure applied when the pegwood is rammed into a hole, whatever facets on the tip would be crushed until it ends up smooth and round. Just look at the pegwood when it is removed from the hole.

We were all taught things that have no scientific basis. We need to sit down and distill fact from fiction.

Edited by HectorLooi
Typo
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, HectorLooi said:

And for those who think the waterpik is the answer to flossing, it isn't. The waterpik can only remove loose food particles. It can't remove plaque, it can't remove food particles pinched in the contact area of the teeth

Damn! You went from preach'n to medl'n

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, HectorLooi said:

But when I thought about it, with the pressure applied when the pegwood is rammed into a hole, whatever facets on the tip would be crushed until it ends up smooth and round. Just look at the pegwood when it is removed from the hole.

You're 100 per cent right about that! The only exception is large jewel holes like those for centre wheel pivots. Still crushed, depending on the pressure applied, but not as much as for small jewel bearings.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, VWatchie said:

You're 100 per cent right about that! The only exception is large jewel holes like those for centre wheel pivots. Still crushed, depending on the pressure applied, but not as much as for small jewel bearings.

The multi angle aspect of pegwood has been mentioned many times by professionals on the internet. Maybe its just that initial extra edge when starting to peg out before it takes a uniform shape. Some pegwood is harder than others and take longer to lose the cut angles. 🤷‍♂️

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anyone tried steam to preclean the main plate and jewels? Something similar to the below? Maybe there is a smaller version or an attachment that would allow you to get into the nooks and crannies of the movement (pre-roving or avoiding anything with shellac of course).  

image.thumb.png.43a3242402a1b2d5803fd8abc160caf7.png

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites




  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • One way is to file it by hand. Good file with sharp edge is needed. Another way is with the aid of milling attachment. There is one more way, thyat is really only on the lathe, but the arbor has to be attached perpendicular to the axis of the spindle. Will be easier to show pictures than to explain this.
    • giving up so soon? then the feelings of frustrations is common for all of us. At work I've requested a cannon? To be technically correct I like to get a black powder cannon as I think I be quite enjoyable to fire some of the watch movements off into the distance never to be seen again unfortunately I don't think I'm going to get my request. So yes we all have frustrations like I have a frustration with this discussion I don't suppose before you run away you could give us the size of the movement and a photograph of the dial side with the keyless parts.  as I'm still rather curious about who made this watch.
    • It wasn't a rookie mistake Nev , i should have know better with me being a joiner. After a hole another a wider bit has nothing to keep it to center and the outside of the flutes draw the drill bit in fast because of no material present. I must have done it thousands of times in timber and plastic . It was a senior moment mistake. 😄
    • Don't give up. You just need patience and practice. Don't use force or try to screw down the plate before making sure everything is in place. My first few watches took me like 45 minutes to get the train wheels in. Now it usually takes me less than a minute. Make sure that all the bottom pivots are in their respective holes before putting on the top plate. Then apply gentle pressure with a pegwood or gloved finger. Start from the barrel, 2nd wheel, 3rd wheel.... and finally the escape wheel. You can feel the plate drop each time you get a pivot in. If you experience the pivots that you have already gotten in coming out of their holes when you work on other wheels down line, you can put 1 or 2 screws nearer the barrel side in but don't exert any force on the screws. Just lightly turn the screws until you feel pressure and backoff 1/4 turn. This will prevent the plates from separating.  I use a homemade tool with a brass wire, shaped like an oiler to lightly touch the wheels to guide them into place. I find that an oiler made of hardened steel can leave scratches on the brass wheels. Once you think you have gotten all the pivots in, test it by using a blower to blow on the escape wheel. It should spin freely. Continue applying pressure on the top plate with the pegwood or finger until you lightly tighten all the screws. Don't tighten fully yet until you reconfirm that the wheels are able to spin freely. And reconfirm again after you have fully tightened all the screws. What you are experiencing is normal. All of us have gone through it. Don't work on watches when you are tired or frustrated. All of us can tell you what that leads to. But I'm sure you'll experience a few hard lessons even after reading this advice. It's only human. Go forth and practice. Good luck!
    • by the way this is very confusing to me? You have a 7s26a and you're comparing it to a 7s26b which is confusing to me because they're not the same? Watch companies are rather amusing when it comes the part numbers seemingly watches with similar  numbers as you're implying should be exactly identical but in this case they are very very dramatically different for instance the 7s26a balance part number is 0310 020 the 7s26b has a different part number 0310 197 as the part numbers are entirely different there must be a reason it noticed that I made two terms in the quote above in bold regulator pins are versus the etachron  system. In addition to changing the regulation part more than likely they change the hairspring. So this would typically main you wouldn't build a swap balance completes from one type to the other because they will be entirely different. this is where looking at the technical guide might yield some amusing information. you'll note in the 7s26b  service guide it explains what the difference is. It makes a reference to the balance staff which is totally inconsequential for this discussion. But the really big difference is the A  version has conventional regulator pins and the B  has is the Etachron  system. In @Jon excellent images up above he didn't explain something? if you look carefully at the images below you'll notice that the outer terminal curve is different  as a guest to accommodate the etachron  system it looks like the terminal curve is farther out. So yes exactly as the parts list indicates the balance completes will look different because they are different. Because they are different there are not interchangeable. so basically because the letter changes at the end in this particular case we end up with two separate balance completes as proven by the parts numbers. Balance completes that are entirely different to accommodate the regulation system conceivably with entirely different characteristics of timing as they are entirely different. So your observation of the balances are different shape is correct they are different.      
×
×
  • Create New...