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Making/finding a case screw for Elgin 539


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At first blush, this seems like a simple task.  I have made screws and have been happy with the results.  However, I am bedeviled by the threads on this one.  As best I can tell, the Martin Fils L and B screwplates will not work.  I had the bright idea to just make a brass screw and use the baseplate of the watch as the cutting tool...nah...I don't like that.

So, I am looking around the list of suppliers I have bookmarked plus ebay.

If anyone has a clever idea, I am all ears.

This is helpful...NOT.

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22 hours ago, LittleWatchShop said:

As best I can tell, the Martin Fils L and B screwplates will not work

that sounds like a Swiss name? Swiss screw in a American watch?

22 hours ago, LittleWatchShop said:

This is helpful...NOT.

are you suggesting that Elgin doesn't use Elgin screws and their watch?

I suppose it's possible if the Elgin screws thread size don't fit for the casings screw than the casings screw may be considered a casing components. In other words like in the days of pocket watches they could go in anybody's made case so conceivably maybe there's a standard for casings screws. In which that would mean that anyone's casings screw would conceivably fit. As long as is the right size of course.

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1 hour ago, JohnR725 said:

that sounds like a Swiss name? Swiss screw in a American watch?

are you suggesting that Elgin doesn't use Elgin screws and their watch?

I suppose it's possible if the Elgin screws thread size don't fit for the casings screw than the casings screw may be considered a casing components. In other words like in the days of pocket watches they could go in anybody's made case so conceivably maybe there's a standard for casings screws. In which that would mean that anyone's casings screw would conceivably fit. As long as is the right size of course.

No, I am not suggesting that. That would have been really dumb of me to. My point, oblique as it was, is that knowing thread pitch is useless knowledge if I am not in possession of a die to cut them.

Re Martin Fils...it is not impossible for an American company to adopt a thread standard of the Swiss. Or is it?

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2 hours ago, LittleWatchShop said:

No, I am not suggesting that. That would have been really dumb of me to. My point, oblique as it was, is that knowing thread pitch is useless knowledge if I am not in possession of a die to cut them.

the question is which came first the die or the tap? The reality is anyone skilled in machining can have either if they just have one. My problem with discussion is I do have a set of Elgin taps they do show up on eBay from time to time so all the Elgin screws can be made today because the taps still remain

but I still wonder especially with pocket watches weather case screws are considered a casing component and maybe they use some other thread size. because so many times cases are not necessarily made by the company who has the watch in the case

 

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14 minutes ago, JohnR725 said:

the question is which came first the die or the tap? The reality is anyone skilled in machining can have either if they just have one. My problem with discussion is I do have a set of Elgin taps they do show up on eBay from time to time so all the Elgin screws can be made today because the taps still remain

but I still wonder especially with pocket watches weather case screws are considered a casing component and maybe they use some other thread size. because so many times cases are not necessarily made by the company who has the watch in the case

 

I wish I had a set of those. Will start watching for them on ebay.

This particular watch is the A11, which as you know, was military spec'd.  Thus it is likely all Elgin.

@JohnR725

Next time you are doing nothing with a camera in your hand, take a picture of your tap and die set so I can salivate

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