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Video setup for tear downs


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I love watching @Marks videos.  While I am not so interested in making 'production' teardown videos, I would love to have a record of my work.

Since I use an ancient eye loop for all of my work (not working through a microscope) and have a more-or-less traditional bench lamp, it is difficult to imagine how to setup a properly oriented camera that is semi-permanent.  Either the lamp, or myself would potentially be in the optical path.

To be honest, I have not spent a great deal of time working through all of the possible physical setups, so maybe I am being lazy for putting this out there for guidance.  But, since everyone has been piling on to offer the quintessential method for sharpening peg wood, maybe there is some interest from those who are skilled in this art--sharing their video setup.

I plan to embark on the service of my personal Valjoux 726 and I need good video to assist the assembly.  TBH, I am scared sh-less about doing this repair, but I have to do it.

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3 hours ago, LittleWatchShop said:

I love watching @Marks videos.  While I am not so interested in making 'production' teardown videos, I would love to have a record of my work.

Since I use an ancient eye loop for all of my work (not working through a microscope) and have a more-or-less traditional bench lamp, it is difficult to imagine how to setup a properly oriented camera that is semi-permanent.  Either the lamp, or myself would potentially be in the optical path.

To be honest, I have not spent a great deal of time working through all of the possible physical setups, so maybe I am being lazy for putting this out there for guidance.  But, since everyone has been piling on to offer the quintessential method for sharpening peg wood, maybe there is some interest from those who are skilled in this art--sharing their video setup.

I plan to embark on the service of my personal Valjoux 726 and I need good video to assist the assembly.  TBH, I am scared sh-less about doing this repair, but I have to do it.

Since you use a loupe you might consider a camera on a tripod or arm positioned directly over your movement holder. Some of the YTers use a digital camera with the appropriate macro lens. It leaves enough room to come in from the side. I’d love to do it this way but I use a scope that doesn’t allow me to keep binocular vision while making video…

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I have two cameras filming when I disassemble. The boom arm coming off the tripod works but I'm not crazy about how much space it takes up on the floor. Also, the camera wants to bounce for a few seconds anytime I have to touch the camera. I used to use one of these Glide Gear setups but it sits on the table top and just touching the table top transmitted vibrations to the camera. Also, sitting on the table top it was always in the way. Ideally I'd like to build a larger version of that so that the legs are on either side of the table. Unfortunately, I think that project is outside of my abilities.

 

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1 hour ago, LittleWatchShop said:

Wow Guy...quite the setup.  Looking at it gave me the idea of building a T-slot frame with a gantry to hold a camera and the light.  I need a simpler camera though...smaller if possible.

Yeah, having something like a gantry would also allow you to mount some LED panels and position them to the sides of the cameras, angled towards the movement. If you manage to make one I'd be interested in the build details.

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One of the problems that I've noticed when people do teaching for instance. Teaching without cameras the students come up and stand in front of the bench and try to look at whatever you're doing. Doesn't work for me because everything is backwards and you really can't see.

Photographing the problem becomes how are you looking at the watch I'm using a loop others as we can see in the group are using a microscope. For instance typically with a microscope you're looking straight down. Which has minor concerns for other reasons but when you looking straight down have you noticed how your hands get in the way. When using a loop you looking at an angle and your hands are less of a problem. I've actually seen this with people filming where I can't see what they're doing because their hands are in the way.

When I was teaching at the school when I did for my PowerPoint presentation was I used a Canon SD 1000 digital camera in macro mode. It's a small camera is why like Debs and I would hold the camera where my eyeball should've been and photographed the watch. So when the students were doing whatever they were doing they would more or less see what I would've seen and what they should be seeing.

But if you doing that with anything resembling a professional camera it becomes hard to look through what ever to see what you're doing.

This is where a lot of times people filming videos basically give up them seeing the work and instead they filmed the work for us.

 

 

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In my setup I have the camera facing the same way I do. I see a lot of top down camera setups that, because it's more convenient, have the camera mount clamped to the rear of the desk, which usually means the camera is facing opposite to the watchmaker. So everything in the video is reversed to what the watchmaker is seeing. The other thing I do with my camera is to not have it facing exactly straight down, it's angled slightly so that when I lean forward a little, it doesn't block the camera. Also, my hands are not always in the way with a little tilt to the camera. I also have that back camera so if I am leaning forward AND my hands are in the way, the back camera has a clear view to fill in for that particular moment.

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I purchased a digital microscope with a 7" screen for £35 (reduced from £125 down to £65 then to £35. Don't ask me why?)

When extended as high as possible, the head was too low to view the whole of the watch. I removed it from the base. Made a wooden block to higher the post and glued it on.  It now views the whole of the watch. I have the post angled slightly back so that I can work without anything in the way. See the photographs.

I work in a box to limit 'pings'. Post is supported by the box, so no recording wobble.

As can bee seen, all I have is the desktop area for everything. When using the computer I place the box on top of the printer.

I am starting to record, but using the microscope base is new to me, therefore practice is the name of the game, again.

Has been really useful for inspection.

This is the cheapest way I can record. Can't afford high end camera's or phones (My goodness do I envy Guy Montag).

I use VCL media player and will use Shotcut for editing. I do not intend to post YouTube.

 

 

 

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Edited by rossjackson01
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Guy Montag wrote

'In my setup I have the camera facing the same way I do. I see a lot of top down camera setups that, because it's more convenient, have the camera mount clamped to the rear of the desk, which usually means the camera is facing opposite to the watchmaker. So everything in the video is reversed to what the watchmaker is seeing'.

I'm trying my microscope for recording what I am doing. As stated by Guy, my setup leans away from me and is reversed. Using the video software I rotated the video 180 and it's so much easier to see. Looks the correct way.

I have to admire people who the Youtube videos. Editing is more time than four of the time of the recording As a record for me, OK. Never going to post. And, it needs a verbal, no sound recorded. Post? Never going to happen. Phew!

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23 minutes ago, rossjackson01 said:

Guy Montag wrote

'In my setup I have the camera facing the same way I do. I see a lot of top down camera setups that, because it's more convenient, have the camera mount clamped to the rear of the desk, which usually means the camera is facing opposite to the watchmaker. So everything in the video is reversed to what the watchmaker is seeing'.

I'm trying my microscope for recording what I am doing. As stated by Guy, my setup leans away from me and is reversed. Using the video software I rotated the video 180 and it's so much easier to see. Looks the correct way.

I have to admire people who the Youtube videos. Editing is more time than four of the time of the recording As a record for me, OK. Never going to post. And, it needs a verbal, no sound recorded. Post? Never going to happen. Phew!

I use a similar digital microscope head for recording and taking single and timed photos. It doesn't have the screen but connects to my laptop for viewing. The magnifcation is not bad at all , I'm able to see very good detail on a balance staff. There is a little time lag when bumping up the resolution but then my laptop is around 15 years old. 

32 minutes ago, rossjackson01 said:

And, it needs a verbal, no sound recorded. 

You could just run a recording from your phone or a dictaphone alongside and in sync with your video . 

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