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looking for a simple, ultra-precise hand-wound movement - suggestions?


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It's not exactly the same as a 7001, though I'm sure they share a lot of parts and function equally well. It begs the question why Peseux (and AS, and many others) made so many different, yet almost identical calibers.

 

It's part of why there was already a government ordered consolidation of certain manufacturers earlier in the 20th century (post Depression)- when each company came with their hands out for subsidies to develop a new caliber, they were like, "there's not only no room for more of the same calibers, there's no room for all of you!". Obviously it's a long complex story, ending in the formation of ASSUAG (mandated by the gov and banks) and SSIH (more of a volontary merger of Omega and Tissot), but that's the gist. Eventually with the quartz crisis many makers went bust, and a lot of what was left got absorbed by SMH, founded by Hayek in the early 80s, and that became Swatch Group.

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2 hours ago, VWatchie said:

image.thumb.png.ca4b7a36b14a4ff5e5091f041358ef31.png

image.thumb.png.43523869c3b882b0c1be4bf6fcb64065.png

I just bought this on eBay. It's housing a Peseux cal. 7040 (or possibly 7046). It looks pretty with its côtes de genève. It's going to be interesting to see how it performs. As I understand it, this calibre is still being produced by ETA with a calibre number of 7001 (used by Nomos, for example). Again, thanks for the tip @nickelsilver!

Very nice watchie, I've noticed of late you have a strict fascination with accurate timekeeping 🙂

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4 hours ago, VWatchie said:

image.thumb.png.ca4b7a36b14a4ff5e5091f041358ef31.png

image.thumb.png.43523869c3b882b0c1be4bf6fcb64065.png

I just bought this on eBay. It's housing a Peseux cal. 7040 (or possibly 7046). It looks pretty with its côtes de genève. It's going to be interesting to see how it performs. As I understand it, this calibre is still being produced by ETA with a calibre number of 7001 (used by Nomos, for example). Again, thanks for the tip @nickelsilver!

Beautiful watch VWatchie.

The minute and date hands are coaxial though, is it still regarded as a regulateur display? 

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20 hours ago, Neverenoughwatches said:

Very nice watchie, I've noticed of late you have a strict fascination with accurate timekeeping 🙂

Very observant @Neverenoughwatches! Yes, anything precision fascinates me, be it watch movements, fine watch tools, competition rifles, hand-built musical instruments, the dental instruments at my wife's clinic, and so on.

When my parents gave me my first watch, in the late '60s or early '70s (mechanical, of course) I opened it up but did not tell my parents as they would have "killed" me. I didn't open it because I wanted to see the mechanics of it so much, but because I tried to regulate it. I really can't remember how I knew it could be regulated, but anyway, I messed it up badly and after that, I never wore it because it couldn't keep time. I never told my parents about it but simply said I didn't like wearing it. Deep down I was feeling miserable about it because it had been my number one dream to have a watch. Unfortunately, there was no one around who could help me take care of it. I often thought that if someone could have educated me I would probably have been a watchmaker today.

gildedringsaroundthejewels.jpg.b6d79a7f16521395362321f27edbda64.jpg

BTW, does anyone know what these gilded rings around the jewels are? Perhaps just decoration? I wonder if they will be on the dial side as well. Hmm...

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45 minutes ago, VWatchie said:

Very observant @Neverenoughwatches! Yes, anything precision fascinates me, be it watch movements, fine watch tools, competition rifles, hand-built musical instruments, the dental instruments at my wife's clinic, and so on.

When my parents gave me my first watch, in the late '60s or early '70s (mechanical, of course) I opened it up but did not tell my parents as they would have "killed" me. I didn't open it because I wanted to see the mechanics of it so much, but because I tried to regulate it. I really can't remember how I knew it could be regulated, but anyway, I messed it up badly and after that, I never wore it because it couldn't keep time. I never told my parents about it but simply said I didn't like wearing it. Deep down I was feeling miserable about it because it had been my number one dream to have a watch. Unfortunately, there was no one around who could help me take care of it. I often thought that if someone could have educated me I would probably have been a watchmaker today.

gildedringsaroundthejewels.jpg.b6d79a7f16521395362321f27edbda64.jpg

BTW, does anyone know what these gilded rings around the jewels are? Perhaps just decoration? I wonder if they will be on the dial side as well. Hmm...

Aw thanks for sharing that story Watchie, i will admit it brought a tear to think of a young lad's inquistive mind unknowingly causing himself disappointment. I must have had the same wonder, i remember taking the back of my grandfather's broken watch  and thinking why are there precious jewels in there, i was around 6 or 7. I still have that watch, now repaired and often worn. These events when we are younger seem to lay down a path for us to follow. Re. the gilded rings, are they not gold or brass jewel settings ?

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1 hour ago, VWatchie said:

BTW, does anyone know what these gilded rings around the jewels are? Perhaps just decoration? I wonder if they will be on the dial side as well. Hmm...

Seems like a simple question but minor problems first we need the caliber then we can look up the movement and speculate on the answer

On 11/20/2023 at 1:04 AM, VWatchie said:

Peseux cal. 7040 (or possibly 7046)

Then movement pictures front and back but does answer the question but presents another problem. Apparently they came with different finishings from plane ordinary looking to nice but there is still the clue there

http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&&2uswk&Peseux_7040

Oh because this is a nice movement is still in production and it we have a much prettier picture of the movement here both front and back with bonus material.

https://shopb2b.eta.ch/en/mecaline/7001-7001-5.html

Classically when you look at watches you'll observe that the dial side.usually visible always has smaller jewels. The side that's visible they're usually larger the same as whatever shock protection system they will be larger everything looks nicer because it's visually seen. So my guess is the ring is just add to the beauty of the finish. It gives the jewels a nicer look than it already has.

Then while you're here you can download the technical guide. Then typically for the technical guides they will be listed for different languages. Occasionally that be something different if it's made somehow differently it might have a different manual and looks like you get a separate manual for the new regulation system as it has a  etachron system.

 

 

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28 minutes ago, JohnR725 said:

Classically when you look at watches you'll observe that the dial side.usually visible always has smaller jewels. The side that's visible they're usually larger the same as whatever shock protection system they will be larger everything looks nicer because it's visually seen. So my guess is the ring is just add to the beauty of the finish. It gives the jewels a nicer look than it already has.

 

🤔 since it has a display caseback just for decoration then, to imitate an old traditional look of quality.

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