Jump to content

Does anyone actually use the Seiko lubricants?


Recommended Posts

Hi everyone.

Looking at the Seiko documentation for the 6r15/nh3x/7s26 etc, I see that Seiko basically uses one oil - Citizen AO-3A and one grease - Seiko S6, to lubricate those movements. They also use Seiko S4 grease but for just one part - the first reduction wheel. 
Reading the various threads, it appears that those working on Seiko movements however just use the Moebius 9010/9104/9415/9504 combination with 8141/8217 for mainsprings.

A question: does anyone here actually use the Seiko oils? How do they compare to the Euro alternatives?
Also, what braking grease does Seiko use in their 6r/nh/7s barrels - S3 or S2? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, JohnFrum said:

Seiko basically uses one oil - Citizen AO-3A

Seiko doesn't mention any Citizen product. You may have read about "A oil", that's Moebius 9010.

 

10 minutes ago, JohnFrum said:

Seiko S4 grease but for just one part - the first reduction wheel.

The magic hands ratchet wheel. S4 is graphite loaded grease which supposedly helps with metal to metal friction.

 

10 minutes ago, JohnFrum said:

what braking grease does Seiko use in their 6r/nh/7s barrels - S3 or S2? 

We can't know what they use at the factory, and since the barrels it's supposed to be never opened and messed with (which is an excellent idea, albeit one that many beginners find difficult to accept) there is no recommendation about in their documents. We know however that is back, sticky stuff that may look like S4. Do not be surprised however if opening a Seiko barrels  you will find it totally clean and dry. Seiko has multiple factories and multiple lubrication standards, including terrible or none (except balance jewels).

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, jdm said:

Seiko doesn't mention any Citizen product. You may have read about "A oil", that's Moebius 9010.

Thanks.

The 6R15C/D says “AO-3(Moebius-A)” which I had assumed was Citizen AO-3A (sold by CousinsUK). 

With the discontinuation of the 6R15, I purchased a complete NE15 movement and a 6R mainspring barrel for future servicing of my Sarb 033 and 035. Doubt I will ever need to replace the mainsprings but good to have spare parts for the future. I also have a NH36 put aside as a parts donor. You can probably tell I am fond of my Sarbs. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, JohnFrum said:

The 6R15C/D says “AO-3(Moebius-A)” which I had assumed was Citizen AO-3A (sold by CousinsUK).

Probably that means either one, but didn’t wanted to mention Citizen explicitely.

 

24 minutes ago, JohnFrum said:

For future servicing of my Sarb 033 and 035.

I recommend that you do a large amount of practice on other easier and cheaper mov.ts to be well prepared for when that time will come. Which can be surprisingly longer than expected.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
53 minutes ago, jdm said:

I recommend that you do a large amount of practice on other easier and cheaper mov.ts to be well prepared for when that time will come. Which can be surprisingly longer than expected.


Bought a 6497 movement (actually a Chinese clone of the original Seagull Chinese 6497 clone - ST3600-2) for learning purposes. Assuming skill set improves, will then practice on a Seiko 5 I never wear anymore. Probably on a NH36 movement as well before I attempt working on a 6R15 watch. 
 

There was a working Zodiac 52 manual movement (with crystal/original dial and hour hand) listed on Ebay for 15 dollars. Bought it for practice as well. No technical guide available but should be hopefully be similar to the 6497 (with its excellent documentation). 

Edited by JohnFrum
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I have never tackled a Seiko watch. I suspect that the folks at Seiko are perfectly able to create synthetic lubrication that is equivalent to the more common Swiss oils (Moebius). The reality is they are all too expensive and if you ever find any Seiko lubrication guides they'll likely call out Seiko oils.

As has been mentioned above (and elsewhere) practice on a less complicated watch movement first. A Seagull movement won't care if you used Seiko oil, Moebius oil or an inexpensive light oil and some Molykote DX white paste grease.

There are a number of videos that you can watch, this one is a good place to start.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I have never yet attempted to fix a hairspring. I grabbed a parts watch with an AS 1240 out of a job lot thinking I'd maybe get it running for a relative. But I found this bird's nest of a hairspring with at least two hard crimps (almost like "folds"). It looks much much worse than any hairspring straightening demonstration I've seen so I'm curious whether this is fixable as an advanced case and worth the experience of trying, or if it is too far gone. Is it possible to unbend these hard angles? Considering I have broken mainsprings with less severe crimps, I am assuming this can't be fixed but thought I would ask. Thanks!
    • I guess the manufacturing world has succeeded in messing with our minds. in our dental industry, things like liquid mercury and gold alloy have expiration dates. C'mon .... Really? Mercury is an element and gold is stable. So how do they expire? Previously a batch number or lot number was sufficient. Manufacturers became greedy and started putting expiration dates on everything. Making consumers feel guilty or unsafe using expired products, resulting in perfectly good stuff getting thrown away. I think some common sense is needed. Although they say honey found in an Egyptian pyramid is still good, I wouldn't want to try 3000 year old honey. But I would certainly use expired lubricants. (Ahem... not the personal type, of course. 😉)
    • Jim, Where in Florida?  I hope not in IAN's path.  I am in Homosassa and have received my Pearl Supreme and was wondering what mods you did to improve the wiring? Thanks
    • You realize that if he does that it will likely come with another cleaning machine, lathe and a fully stocked cabinet of crystals... 🙂 
    • I don't know... ...however I would venture to guess that lubricating with "expired" oil would be effective but might not "last" as long as you might hope. My question is: Are you charging for your services or is your watch repair limited to learning the trade on your own dime? It would seem that if you are charging customers for watch servicing you ought to be able to replace your dated oil whereas if you are only worried about your own watches you ought to be able to determine that the "old" oil you've used is going to want to be cleaned and re-lubed on a more aggressive schedule.
×
×
  • Create New...