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    • By Pen
      Hi Guys
      Pen here, New member
      Cool site full of really good info
      Glad to join you
    • By monastic
      I'm just finishing up a vintage Mickey Mouse watch with a Timex #24 movement. I performed cleaning per the Timex 24 service manual, which includes removing the balance and hairspring assembly. For future reference I need help in dealing with the too-soft brass V-Conic screw.

      I am not in the habit of rounding out screw slots, yet after carefully shaping my screwdriver tip and working as slowly and carefully as I could, I managed to mangle the balance screw slot anyway as the force required to turn the screw was apparently greater than the integrity of the brass Timex used for this part in this movement.
      I've seen photos of a #25 movement which also employs the V-Conic assembly, but did not appear to have the same soft brass balance screw. If anyone here has experience with this and can offer advice, please comment. Thanks!

    • By Marc5555
      So there is this timex automatic i found online from a reputable seller. I cant find much about it anywhere. Ive been looking for a timex automatic but already have a few watches that look like the marlin. This one is a little different and i like it. Any info would be greatly appreciated

    • By tmilligan
      Question for those who work on Vintage Timex watches:
      I've restored several Timex pieces from the late '60s to the late '70s.  The technique I learned (from Internet posts and tutorials) say to simply loosen the dial-side balance pivot by unscrewing it 1/2 turn prior to cleaning the entire movement in an ultrasonic cleaner.  This method contradicts the official Timex service manuals, which state that the balance should be removed, cleaned separately and reinstalled.  Thus preventing the hairspring form being damaged in the ultrasonic cleaner.
      My experience is this: 
      Leaving the balance in place (slightly loosened) is much easier and will work on the standard movements used in the '70s (M24/25, M32/33, M104, etc.) Attempting the same method on movements from the '50s and '60s (M22, M29, etc) will result in a kinked hairspring that is damn near impossible to un-kink.  So my question is this:
      What do you experienced Timex restoration experts recommend?  Leave the balance/hairspring in the movement for cleaning, or take it out to soak in a separate jar?
      Is the potential for hairspring damage greater when removing/reinstalling the balance - in comparison to leaving it in place?
      I've messed up a couple of vintage movements that I really wish I hadn't.   I don't want to make those mistakes again.
      Thanks for any insights!
        -Todd
       
    • By kma2018
      I'm happy to finally start posting on this terrific watch repair community forum. I've been a member for almost a year, but have been mostly searching the forum for asked and answered questions that might help me with my novice watch repair techniques. I'm a vintage watch enthusiast with a special love of Timex watches from the 1950s  through the 1970s. I developed an interest in watches about 4 years ago when I rediscovered two mechanical watches (a vintage Longines and a Seiko 5) that my father had left in a desk drawer years ago before he passed. Amazingly, both ran in spite of never having been serviced! I was hooked and began my own mechanical watch journey. I'm looking forward to learning more from this wonderful community.
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    • If you've used properly fitting hollow ground blades for larger fasteners you know they can handle a lot more torque than a regular screw driver without damage fasteners.   The difference is so pronounced you just should not work on antique machinery/equipment with slotted fasteners without using hollow ground blades or you will botch up the fasteners. However, relative to the current debate, two things occur to me 1)  To get the performance noted above, the bit has be a very good fit in the slot.  My set has I think 85 or 90 pieces.  Without that selection and ability to find a perfect fit, their advantage pretty much disappears.    Is a watchmaker going to have a similar selection to ensure that perfect fit and futz about constantly checking microscopic differences in fit?  2) Performance is superior, but the metric is torque handling ability.  Does this even matter in watching making?   My limited experience suggest no.  otoh, if you are  regularly damaging heads of screws with taper blades than yeah, figure out how to get an assortment of hollow ground bits that work for you....but otherwise, why worry about it?   imo there is no debate to be had on what is superior, the debate is simply whether it matters given the torques involved. A young guy I know worked for Roger Smith for few years (talk about a learning opportunity!).....I'm curious on he was taught    
    • Here is my quick video for making a leather belt for a Watchmakers Lathe. Enjoy.       Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    • yes sir, forgot to mention "cone shape",  the  ajuster is a good thing,  i have over tightened the staff in the past.  this one is "floating" almost 1/16 inch !   i decided not to tighten the staff.  it's back together and keeping good time. Thanks,  vin
    • Welcome to WRT forum.  
    • the one on the left   IS   A  hollow grind.  vin
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