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Found 23 results

  1. Hi, I’m trying to replace the crystal on this expedition. I have pulled the stem and the movement. The crystal was shattered. It seems to be a 29.5mm crystal with a 1mm depth. I don’t see a gasket. How would I apply the new crystal? Does it press without a gasket? Thank you for any help provided! Brian
  2. I've recently encountered the world of Timex watches. As everyone knows they are still in production and the new Timex watches are all quartz. But the line goes back decades. I myself have bags of discarded Timexes. Been fiddling with them recently. I've had a few flops but I'm surprised as how robust they are. Even my paws seem sufficient to revive some of them. Recently spent a pleasant half-day working on an old 50-60's era men's mechanical. Polished the case, buffed the crystal, did a partial disassembly of the movement, popped the whole thing into the cleaner. Came out looking like a new watch. Put the balance back in (and made a bit of a mess of it) and it works. Seems to keep good time in spite of my faux pas (paws!). It would be fun to get a bag of watches working again. Anyone know how to service the Timex Electric; the analog mechanical watch coupled to a solenoid (or something like it) which was used to provide a push to the balance to provide timing and energy. I have several. They look like they'd work but I doubt they would with modern batteries. (???) I've perused several threads here from like minded individuals who, like me, love these humble little pieces that lack all pretense yet "do their duty" faithfully. How can we share information? I really would like some tips/tricks/gadgets etc. that would make restoration easier and safer.
  3. So there is this timex automatic i found online from a reputable seller. I cant find much about it anywhere. Ive been looking for a timex automatic but already have a few watches that look like the marlin. This one is a little different and i like it. Any info would be greatly appreciated
  4. Just starting a watch collection. Mostly hand-me-downs at the moment. Looking for advice, repair help and parts. Cheers
  5. Question for those who work on Vintage Timex watches: I've restored several Timex pieces from the late '60s to the late '70s. The technique I learned (from Internet posts and tutorials) say to simply loosen the dial-side balance pivot by unscrewing it 1/2 turn prior to cleaning the entire movement in an ultrasonic cleaner. This method contradicts the official Timex service manuals, which state that the balance should be removed, cleaned separately and reinstalled. Thus preventing the hairspring form being damaged in the ultrasonic cleaner. My experience is this: Leaving the balance in place (slightly loosened) is much easier and will work on the standard movements used in the '70s (M24/25, M32/33, M104, etc.) Attempting the same method on movements from the '50s and '60s (M22, M29, etc) will result in a kinked hairspring that is damn near impossible to un-kink. So my question is this: What do you experienced Timex restoration experts recommend? Leave the balance/hairspring in the movement for cleaning, or take it out to soak in a separate jar? Is the potential for hairspring damage greater when removing/reinstalling the balance - in comparison to leaving it in place? I've messed up a couple of vintage movements that I really wish I hadn't. I don't want to make those mistakes again. Thanks for any insights! -Todd
  6. I'm just finishing up a vintage Mickey Mouse watch with a Timex #24 movement. I performed cleaning per the Timex 24 service manual, which includes removing the balance and hairspring assembly. For future reference I need help in dealing with the too-soft brass V-Conic screw. I am not in the habit of rounding out screw slots, yet after carefully shaping my screwdriver tip and working as slowly and carefully as I could, I managed to mangle the balance screw slot anyway as the force required to turn the screw was apparently greater than the integrity of the brass Timex used for this part in this movement. I've seen photos of a #25 movement which also employs the V-Conic assembly, but did not appear to have the same soft brass balance screw. If anyone here has experience with this and can offer advice, please comment. Thanks!
  7. Good afternoon everyone. I have finally taken apart my wife's grandfathers Timex watch, which has a 24 movement. I have several questions: 1. The stem is really sloppy, what can cause that? 2. What is the best way to clean this movement. I do not have a machine so it will be done manually. 3. Where can I get a crystal? Is there a place to buy them if I measure it? Thank you for all of your help.
  8. I'm happy to finally start posting on this terrific watch repair community forum. I've been a member for almost a year, but have been mostly searching the forum for asked and answered questions that might help me with my novice watch repair techniques. I'm a vintage watch enthusiast with a special love of Timex watches from the 1950s through the 1970s. I developed an interest in watches about 4 years ago when I rediscovered two mechanical watches (a vintage Longines and a Seiko 5) that my father had left in a desk drawer years ago before he passed. Amazingly, both ran in spite of never having been serviced! I was hooked and began my own mechanical watch journey. I'm looking forward to learning more from this wonderful community.
  9. Just got this watch in today and was polishing the crystal when it popped out! Have looked everywhere and cannot find out how to get it back on! Is it a snap-in? Glue-on? Need help!!! It is an acrylic crystal, btw. Please and thank you!
  10. I am a novice so please bear with me. I just acquired a second hand Timex Expedition watch and the bracelet is too long for my wrist. So I checked online the various types of generic bracelet (friction pin, pin and collar, folded link, etc.) but my bracelet doesn't look like any of them. It has the "arrows" that indicate that the "arrowed" links can be removed but the replaceable links have a plain looking pin end on both sides of the bracelet. That is, there is no sign of the "slot" that is associated with a friction pin, there is no sign of a collar that is concentric with the pin, and there is no sign of the recess associated with the folded link bracelet type. Do you think that the bracelet is some other type? I have tried to use the push-pin on the end of my Burgeon tool but the bracelet pin does not want to move. Would a simple pin-pusher tool do it?
  11. Hi All Not long ago I was given and old Timex that belonged to my grandfather. It came to me as pictured and I haven't had the time to look at it since, I know very little about Timex watches and I am not even sure what model or what year it was manufactured in. Its missing its stem/crown, so I would like to identifying a suitable replacement. I would be very grateful if anyone could shed some light on this watch or even point me in the right direction so that I can find out if the old thing will still tick over and hopefully put it back into daily use. Many Thanks in Advance
  12. Hi everyone, I'm Mark from Southern California I have been collecting vintage Timex at local flea markets, garage sales, online and wherever I can get my hands on them for about a year or so. I have cracked a few open out of curiosity but plan to learn how to do simple repairs and servicing. I have enjoyed and appreciated the info that others have shared on this forum, so that's why I joined. Happy to be here!
  13. Hi! I posted this question in another forum but I think it's more suited in this discussion! So I just bought a Timex Watch and need to remove the movement for reasons. I snapped of the back and discovered that this is not the way to remove it. So I'm wondering if I have to remove the glass and pull it all out from the front and if so - how do I go by doing this? I'm still very new to all this but I want to learn!
  14. Recent pic ups at the local flea market. After a little clean up: Both running strong.
  15. I have two questions to ask. One is a problem with my watch. It is a 24 hour watch, and the second hand stops at random points, and sticks. I have tried replacing the battery, but it doesn't seem to fix it. And the second is what kind of watch is this? I have tried googling it, but nothing popped up. And it has no serial number. I can take a photo of the inside if it will help.
  16. Hello everyone, I bought a Marlin 1963 with a number 22 movement that was not running. I cleaned it and oiled the pivots, (used the service manuals I got on a Timex forum, really helpful). It is working amazingly well now, very proud. Also, I think someone tried to oil the watch, to get it running, and it leaked on to the dial. I tried cleaning the dial, which only did more harm than good. Furthermore, me opening and closing the watch, two of the nubs holding the dial in place broke off. I am looking for a replacement dial, but until I find one, does anyone maybe have advise on how to hold the dial in place? Thanks
  17. One of the great things about collecting and repairing is that feeling of taking a bunch of parts and making a working watch again. This restore begins with a scrap pile of cases from a former Timex repair center. I chose a late 1960's Marlin case that is missing the stem tube. So to the parts stash and one issue resolved. Off it than goes to get a bath in cleaning solution , polished, new crystal added along with correct case back. Next I service a used #24 movement also from the same lot the cases came with and the assembly begins. Since the hands are chromed, I just use an old eraser pencil to bring back their shine. The sweep comes from NOS stock. Grease the stem tube, set lever, insert a NOS stem\crown, snap on the case back and there ya go. Will give this one a wear to test its time keeping.
  18. Hi everyone, I was asked to take a look at a broken Nautica watch. I tried a fresh battery and fair enough, it doesn't run. Closer inspection revealed a broken part on the setting lever (???) (not sure this term applies to quartz movements, there are lots of parts in there that don't look like anything I'm used to). Turns out the movement is a Timex m649. So I looked around the usual places for a replacement: Otto Frei, cousinUK, Esslinger.... and the EvilBay but no luck. I's either not available or marked obsolete. I'm was hoping to find a chart with an equivalent movement or the new version of the movement but no luck. I'm trying to get watch to tick more than I want the indiglo function to work if that makes any difference (althought it comes from the dial, not the movement apparently). Would anybody have any idea what I could replace this movement with?
  19. hello, I am a retired dr of dental surgery. I am finding the hobby of watch repairing quite fascinating . The skills required are very similar to my profession. I have been using many of my dental instruments and work under my 20-40 power microscope. my topic is TIMEX mechanical watches circa 1959-. I thought I was getting better dissembling and reassembling many movements like the ETA 2824 ETC. Then I started with my neighbors 1959 TIMEX self wind-I can't put it back together! I can see where the movement is not of the quality of the other movements I have played with. I guess part of my learning curve is running into these roadblocks but some of my ego got a bit injured. I was just wondering if anyone has had a similar experience. I really enjoy this website. I also have great interest in photography-especially macro so I am blendinding watch repair into my other interests. Thanks to Mark
  20. Hello all, I'm about to service a Timex 260 electric movement. It's running strong as-is, but I doubt that it has been cleaned or lubricated in its lifetime. I do have the service manual for the movement and for most of the oil points, the SM calls for Moebius Synt-A-Lube, without specifying a product number (I intend to use Moebius 9010), but for the friction pinion the manual calls for "spreading type oil" (Woods AAAA oil). I cannot find a cross-reference for this old Woods oil and most watch oils are, of course, specifically formulated to NOT spread... so, I'm seeking advice and suggestions for a suitable oil to use on the friction pinion. Also, if anyone thinks that 9010 is NOT appropriate to use for the various other points, please let me know. Thanks much! Ben
  21. Hello everyone from Florida! My name is Scott and I have been working with mostly Timex watches for the past four years (restoring and collecting) and have recently branched out into Seiko's. My first refurbish is a '68 6119 and has been both rewarding and challenging. SO much to learn! I belong to another forum which is great, and was recommended this forum by a member here. This looks to be a great place to hang out to both learn and contribute what I can. Thanks! Scott
  22. Hi I am new here. I am trying to find stem for timex caliber M921. It's discontinued everywhere. Is there anyone can help me finding this part please.....
  23. this was my first watch my father gave to me it had stopped years ago but with a little oil it started working again , lucky for me , now it is time to install a new crystal and this is my problem is this a what they call a high dome crystal or is this a small dome crystal , it has a small lip around it and is 27.11mm as seen in the photo`s on the the watch face it has these number 23150 02474 I found out the last number 74 is the year 1974 , I would be grateful for any help
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