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My new apron, a simple solution.


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imageproxy.php?img=&key=77f0dcc5ac0f9d5bThe lowly kitchen apron to the rescue. After having spent way to much time on the floor looking for parts and finally bending the pivot on a newly installed balance staff it was time for a solution. Pip to the rescue with his recommended Jacot video by Richard Edwards. While the video was certainly informative on the use of the Jacot tool, it was his use of the apron that caught my eye. Pure genius I thought and raced off to the nearest craft store for a plain white apron with no pockets. After I endured the smiles and jokes from the wife it was time to try it out. Brilliant is all i can say. It simply clips to the underside of the desk with spring clamps and slips over the neck no problem. Easy as pie. I dropped parts all night and not one hit the floor. :) It is easy to remove and I just leave it clipped to the desk if I have to leave for a bit. Probably old news to most of you but hopefully it will keep someone else off the floor and at the bench.:)imageproxy.php?img=&key=77f0dcc5ac0f9d5b picture not uploading for some reason...

Ron

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Good idea as well. My biggest problem at the bench is my tendency to bring the part to the eye rather than the eye to the part. Finding a chair that goes low enough for the desk is an issue as well. Would like a nice watchmakers bench but would have to give up the roll top desk and I can't do that...IMG_1476.jpg

Finally remembered the photo insertion procedure :)

Ron

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Luck is only good for things that fall straight down :) that is true... things that fly know no limits. On my knees with a flashlight is still a big part of the game lol The apron sure helps with the bigger stuff that gets bent when dropped to many times...

Ron

 

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Myself,  I employ a s different approach to the s to the problem with “flying parts”  with a success rate of 6/0 my favor. I use (with extreme caution) a 2X2X1/2 inch Rare Earth Magnet, waving it around, over the floor and flat surfaces until it finds the part. For those that have no exposure to rare earth magnets, they can be outright dangerous, snapping your fingers if you get to close to any mass of ferrous metals.

I am extremely cautious to keep it away from watch and/or tools,  understanding it’s not a mix with watches. But if it’s the difference of finding or losing a part, I go with the less of two evils and have had good luck with the finds.  

Photoed below, well away from my work. 

20181128_130332.jpg

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Hi Ron   It is something I have been meaning to do for a while probably should make the effort I spend some time hunting for lost bits, Those I do find are never in the region where dropped,  murphys law here I think.        The chance of finding the part is proportional to its importance.

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Great idea re the apron, I must try.  I use 3 salvaged magnets from (gift) boxes that have a magnetic closure.  These are very powerful and typically the size of cell battery.  I let them attach to a long steel letter opener and use this to sweep around the floor, worktop, clothing and hair!.  I also wiggle it around in the vac cleaner bag before disposal and have later found bits that way!  Just remember to demag the part, as, if it goes again it could attach itself magnetically to something.              For non-magnetic stuff I wrap a length of gaffa/duct tape round my hand and sweep with this, and then inspect with eyeglass, I have found very small end jewels this way.          As with most of us, we probably have the cleanest floor in the house!!

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Amen to that canthus I do have the cleanest floor in the house for the very reason as you stated. :) I have not had the need for a magnet yet all though it probably wouldn't hurt to have one on standby...My biggest reason for the apron is to protect things like the balance staff I bent from dropping it so many times on the floor. Those little buggers are getting expensive and buying a lathe and learning it's use are a ways down the road yet. Going to the trouble to learn how to change a staff and acquiring the tools to do so and truing the balance only to discover a bent pivot is indeed frustrating to say the least. Learning to use the Jacot tool is just asking for dropped balances :(

Good to hear other solutions as well as other techniques to the parts on the floor dilemma that plague us all :)

Ron

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