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I’ll be getting my basic tools soon and some tools, there are too many choices and I would appreciate your opinions to make the right choice.

I’m not looking for the cheapest but don’t want to buy the most expensive tools if they are the same as cheaper alternatives.

I’ll start with screwdrivers. They will be used a lot and I’m sure they should be good.
I will go for a set with a rotating stand to make life easier.

I notice that there are usually two same sets, one has a larger stand and more blades than the other, perhaps one extra screwdriver. The one with the larger stand is significantly more expensive than the one with the smaller stand.
I presume that they are the same screwdrivers, the larger stands are more convenient having separate compartments for spare blades. Understandably, the larger stand will be more expensive but double the price? Am I missing something here?

A*F SS 9 pieces £ 41.95 (small stand)
A*F SS 9 pieces £ 164.95 (large stand)

Bergeon Cr 9 pieces £ 73.95 (small stand)
Bergeon Cr 10 pieces £ 194.95 (large stand)

Are the Bergeon and Horotec considerably better screwdrivers than the A*F?
The price difference between the smaller stands (comparing A*F and Bergeon) is significant while the price difference between the larger stands is much less, also the A*F has 9 pieces and the Bergeon 10 pieces so the price is about the same if not more expensive than the Bergeon.

Lastly, the choices are stainless steel, chromium and aluminium. Does it make any difference?

Peter

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I have both Bergeon and AF tools; screwdrivers as well. I would say the quality of the drivers is comparable.

The Bergeon 9 pc set is the one I use now. I had (maybe I still have it..) an AF set in the plastic pouch and that was fine quality but the former has the nice rotating stand (color coded too- good if you wear glasses and they're off while you have a luope in). If you work off a matt, with your tools laid out, the pouch is fine actually.

I got my set on special from Ofrei for ~$100 a while ago And I like the rotating stand because my work area is small and always temporary. It's a heavy stand with a non-slip base. Spare tips store inside.

My Bergeon set in the stand comes with a second set of spare blades... Make sure the AF set does as well, or they are not as comparable.

And, you will need a stone and guide for sharpening your blades. You WILL chip them, and the spares get you going again quickly. But, you then need to redress the chipped blades so you have your spares ready to go. Or, order a few of the smaller size spare blades until you are up to speed redressing them. It's a bit of an art...

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I am guessing you bought the AF first and the Bergeon afterwards? What made you to buy another set of screwdrivers? The rotating stand and the colour coding? Do you think if the AF screwdrivers were on a rotating stand and were colour coded you wouldn’t look for another set?

Apologies for so many questions, I want to buy only one set and I want to make sure I get it right the first time.

So far I know that I want the rotating stand. However I don’t know whether the price difference is in the brand name, but if it is, I don’t see the point of buying Bergeon or Horotec.

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I think I still have the AF set- I just don’t use them. The stand and spare blades are nice- for my current work area  

But I was a car mechanic first. Two things you have an abundance of are: hammers and screwdrivers. If you find the standard drivers work well for what you do, that’s great. If you diversify to several movements, the screw designs vary slightly. Particularly on higher end movements, you want as close to perfect slot engagement as you can get to avoid any mark on a screw in this age of the clear caseback...

i wirk on etas and Rolex predominately so all closed back and only for myself. So I do have some ugly screws hidden inside but not a lot now that I’m a bit more skilled.  The standard drivers work well for me. If I ever start working for others, I will end up with small tool kits specific to each maker, with drivers optimized for each. What I like about Eta and Rolex is their simplicity.  I can’t tune a free sprung balance but otherwise I can usually figure out the problem and fix it with a minimum of collateral or cosmetic damage  

If you are like me, just working for yourself and not selling your skills outside, get the AF set and get busy. But you will buy more. 

There is no Burgeon truck coming each week to replace broken drivers like the Snap-On truck... unfortunately. 

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Hmm, I think I won’t mess about with the screwdrivers and get a good Horotec or Bergeon set of 10 or 12. It may be too many to start with but they will always be there if I need them.

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I’m re-thinking the revolving stand. Are they easy to put away and store? I guess I’d have to keep them in the cardboard box they come in?
I’m leaning towards the wooden case now as I do not have a dedicated space for tinkering with watches and will not be able keep it on the desk all the time.

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1 hour ago, PeterS said:

I’m re-thinking the revolving stand. Are they easy to put away and store? I guess I’d have to keep them in the cardboard box they come in?
I’m leaning towards the wooden case now as I do not have a dedicated space for tinkering with watches and will not be able keep it on the desk all the time.

   as an auto mechanic,   with a degree of "color blindness",   organizing tools is very important. those color coded screwdrivers stands are no good.   I too would like to design ( or find) a good stand.   make a " prototype out of card board"  -  build it out of wood.  vin

 

 

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That’s what I was thinking. Buy it in a wooden case to keep them protected and make a stand out of wood for 3-4 screwdrivers I will need for the job.

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Also an auto mechanic...

Once I tried to get my screwdrivers organized by handle color to tip: i.e. the Phillips tips were green and straight tips were red.

That didn't last long, as some specialized tips were only available with certain handles (usually black) etc. Seemed like a good idea. Now I have every color in the catalogue mixed in the drawer...

For wood working I organize my drill bits and router bits on wood blocks. No reason that wouldn't work with precision screwdrivers too...

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I use a pencil roll like this for many of my tools. Easy to roll up and put away when done. During use it lays out at the top of my worktable, makes grabbing a screwdriver,  hand levers, pin vise etc. very easy. Best of all, not expensive. This one is Derwent.

 

 

61KmNUY5tVL._SL1104_.jpg

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In the drawer is not a problem. Phillips on the left and straight on the right. 

Top wrench drawer is inch second is metric. The big socket drawer has all the sockets on labeled trays ((harbor freight) so only the odd and huge are loose in there  

But once they are under the truck and I have one eye closed with brake fluid (or rust) in it, I always grab the wrong tool...

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16 hours ago, dadistic said:

I use a pencil roll like this for many of my tools. Easy to roll up and put away when done. During use it lays out at the top of my worktable, makes grabbing a screwdriver,  hand levers, pin vise etc. very easy. Best of all, not expensive. This one is Derwent.

 

 

61KmNUY5tVL._SL1104_.jpg

  good idea. i use the "roll up" for end wrenches.  just  make a small one for screw drivers !

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