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HI EVERYONE ...I had a Seiko5 SNZG15K1 ...I started playing around with the regulator and bought a timegraph 1000 ... anyways as I was moving the beat lever the hairspring stopped . I removed the spring , wheel and cock and the spring was a mess. I just want to know do these watches come ready to regulate or do you have to turn the brass stay bits on the end that hold the spring ..I think that the spring jumped on mine .but at the time I wasn't thinking straight and ran to disassemble it when I should of looked a bit closer back then ..Thanks Lenny...........

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You're not the chap who's selling a timegrapher together with a SNZG15 in Beckenham are you?

All you need to do is check out the photo attached. Start small, buy a couple of cheap used seiko 5's, de-case them, swap the dials and hands and see how you go.   

7s26a regulating.jpg

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27 minutes ago, Lenny said:

anyways as I was moving the beat lever the hairspring stopped . I removed the spring , wheel and cock and the spring was a mess.

Seiko hairspring are very (insert "very: 5 more times here) delicate. If it is still within repair your best chance is to bring it to a watchmaker to be corrected, otherwise a new balance complete will be needed (out of stock at Cousins at this time). I understand that you are serious having even bought an expensive tool (actually a smartphone app would have been pretty much OK), but to be honest with you I strongly recommend that you practice first with junk movements before moving to the watches that you want to wear or have any value.

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I know what I got to do , order a new hairspring balance and try and install it to the cock ... I got to buy an electron microscope now ....Yea I'm the guy in Beckenham ...if I don't sell it quick im gonna have a go ..

 

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In this thread, Steven has a good suggestion for regulating a 7S26/7S36. I've given it a try and while not perfect it's a good start, especially if you have a timegrapher for fine tuning - I don't yet :-(

 

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In this picture it looks like the regulator pin might snag the hairspring when moving the reg arm , is this just a locked gate and the hairspring rides inside so you can regulate without pulling or deforming the HS..... ??

pic0031.jpg

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4 hours ago, Lenny said:

In this picture it looks like the regulator pin might snag the hairspring when moving the reg arm , is this just a locked gate and the hairspring rides inside so you can regulate without pulling or deforming the HS..... ??

Good picture. No snagging unless you exaggerate rotating. For a beginner it's better to leave it. Discussion:

 

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Well I sold the timegrapher and am bowing out of this hobby , I should have persevered . I could of bought another movement from cousins and swapped it over or try to transplant the balance assembly .. But it's gone now ..At least I know how mechanical watches work ......lol...............

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I bought another watch and Timegrapher ,, I regulated the Parnis power reserve and landed on a magic spot , it's running like a Quartz... I can't beleive it ... ..makes it all worth it ..It helps that it hacks so having the balance wheel stopped is a lot less distracting for newbies..When the Seiko stopped I was pushing the beat lever so I think the balance jewel ended up on the wrong side ,, the wheel stopped dead and wouldn't move ..I didn't realize a bit of beat error is acceptable ...

 

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