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Seiko 7S26B rotor bearing adjustment?


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Hi All,

I have a Seiko 7S26B who’s rotor bearing could do with a little adjustment, tightening up. Is this the type of bearing that can be gently adjusted in a Horia tool? I’ve never done this. If it is possible, any tips or tricks? Can it be done in situ in the rotor? Any help greatly received.

cheers, B.

609D02BB-A4CF-495A-A333-BC3430ED91B1.jpeg

1726CD24-34CC-4C0C-96A2-0BF9A8D5C395.jpeg

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From the looks of it should be adjustable. 

 Press on the washer thats underside of the bearing ( fig 2 )  to move it until you feel it ( the washer) doesn't want to move any deeper.

It can be done in situ

Press carefully:    DO NOT PUNCH

 

Good luck 

 

 

Edited by Nucejoe
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33 minutes ago, Nucejoe said:

From the looks of it should be adjustable. 

 Press on the washer thats underside of the bearing ( fig 2 )  to move it until you feel it ( the washer) doesn't want to move any deeper.

It can be done in situ

Press carefully:    DO NOT PUNCH

 

Good luck 

 

 

Thanks Joe!

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 In fig 2 you can see the washer which is press fitted, press it back with .01 mm tolorance  to the balls of the bearing, obviously theres a risk of damaging the balls in the bearing or deform the washer if you punch.

Support the other side of the bearing on a anvil.

 

 

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23 hours ago, Nucejoe said:

 In fig 2 you can see the washer which is press fitted, press it back with .01 mm tolorance  to the balls of the bearing, obviously theres a risk of damaging the balls in the bearing or deform the washer if you punch.

Support the other side of the bearing on a anvil.

 

 

Thanks Joe!

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  • 3 weeks later...

I think this is the one (Omega Speedmaster Part 1):

image.thumb.png.90e613a6ab7a2d53da6e048e6bda7222.png

image.thumb.png.cb795b5179d4f7aad76a0257e8ad17a9.png

9 hours ago, nevenbekriev said:

And, in fact, did anyone successfull adjustment? 

To be fair he does provide a disclaimer that this solution is only successful when fixing a small problem with the bearing

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Someone, maybe it was Spencer Klein(?), has had some success with hammer time but it doesn't sound like a very permanent solution. Perhaps if spares are really non existent. I bet Spencer has a ton of spares (of every single part).

Edited by Malocchio
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On 10/18/2023 at 8:28 PM, nevenbekriev said:

And, in fact, did anyone successfull adjustment?  No?

Because the bearing is not adjustable...

There is a way to adjust it, but it must be taken apart and one of the cones must be grinded in order to go further against the other cone and thus to reduce free play.

Pictures here

Hi, I didn’t have any success. I adjusted it .01mm at a time a few times and no difference, so didn’t want to go much further. I think it only works with some bearings as someone else said. Thanks guys for your inputs. Ta. B.

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How exactly You did the adjustment? Did You grind the correct side of the cone? On the picture, the cone is put on a diamond file in a way that can be pressed with finger and slided on the file and thus grinded as it should. No way to bring the cones of the bearing closer to each other and no effect at all to happen.

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On 10/19/2023 at 3:48 PM, Malocchio said:

has had some success with hammer time

Just to clarify, this is not the hammer time video, this video is specifically referring to the repair of rotor bearings and he uses a completely different technique. It's worth a try before investing time and effort in a new part as you have nothing to lose.

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5 hours ago, Boydie said:

Hi, I didn’t have any success. I adjusted it .01mm at a time a few times and no difference, so didn’t want to go much further. I think it only works with some bearings as someone else said. Thanks guys for your inputs. Ta. B.

Actually, my question was a retorical one. I knew the answer, that's why I asked. But, If You read my post, the one that You quoted, to the end, You will find that I gave there link to a discussion in another forum (Bulgarian), where I have shown solution for the problem with restoringing this bearings. There are photos there, that show the real process of restoring the bearing.

Edited by nevenbekriev
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  • 1 month later...
On 9/26/2023 at 6:52 PM, Boydie said:

Hi All,

I have a Seiko 7S26B who’s rotor bearing could do with a little adjustment, tightening up. Is this the type of bearing that can be gently adjusted in a Horia tool? I’ve never done this. If it is possible, any tips or tricks? Can it be done in situ in the rotor? Any help greatly received.

cheers, B.

609D02BB-A4CF-495A-A333-BC3430ED91B1.jpeg

1726CD24-34CC-4C0C-96A2-0BF9A8D5C395.jpeg

 

Adjusting the rotor bearing on a Seiko 7S26B is not recommended using a Horia tool or in situ within the rotor.

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On 9/26/2023 at 6:52 PM, Boydie said:

Hi All,

I have a Seiko 7S26B who’s roller bearing could do with a little adjustment, tightening up. Is this the type of bearing that can be gently adjusted in a Horia tool? I’ve never done this. If it is possible, any tips or tricks? Can it be done in situ in the rotor? Any help greatly received.

cheers, B.

609D02BB-A4CF-495A-A333-BC3430ED91B1.jpeg

1726CD24-34CC-4C0C-96A2-0BF9A8D5C395.jpeg

However, if you're determined to try it yourself, I strongly advise against using a Horia tool. It is not the right tool for this job and could cause more harm than good. Instead, you would need specialized press tools and replacement bearings for your specific 7S26B caliber. Or you can check more bearings info at https://www.tradebearings.com/

Edited by jannickz
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I will try again, for the last time.

To restore the bearing, You first have to dismantle it, like this.

20150227-124605.thumb.jpg.d85d6e9eb8ca505331689abd970d1858.jpg

Then, one must grind this surface a little, in order to allow two cones of the internal ring to come closer to each other

20150227-124605.jpg.f51afb02b8479cfb2f57e164aa248cea.jpg

The grinding is done this way, pressing the ring by finger and moving it on grinding surface - in this case a diamond file

20150227-124705.thumb.jpg.e1490d47f3756751369e96f6b5c4bc48.jpg

Then assembling the bearing and test of the free play, if needed - repeat untill free play gets minimal.

No adjustment only by pressing is possible, this is a silly thought.

 

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20 minutes ago, nevenbekriev said:

To restore the bearing, You first have to dismantle it

Thanks for the explanation, can you please advise the best way to dismantle the bearing, is there a trick to getting it apart without damaging it?

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Yes, the old like 7009 are just pressed and and only pushing of the downside part thru the hole of top part, untill the rotor is supported above proper hole is needed. The newer are riveted, so first some drilling of the riveted part is needed. No riveting is needed after all is done, as the screw holds the both parts together well pressed

Edited by nevenbekriev
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