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For me it's always been quartz


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Hi,

My name is Dennis, I have always had some kind of watch but mechanicals have been something I just don't have any feel for, maybe it's the fear of damage or just the annoyance of accuracy compared to quartz? Probably both to be honest.

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I want to be into quartz watches, but I can't get my head around them in a positive way. When I'm doing precision stuff, it's always via computer instrumentation, but that's not a a watch. Mechanicals are about the craftsmanship and artistry, and a decent one is accurate enough to not matter in any practical way. If there's a way to get that same feeling about quartz movements, I'd love to wrap my head around it, but I have yet to find that hook.

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3 hours ago, Dxnnis said:

mechanicals have been something I just don't have any feel for, maybe it's the fear of damage or just the annoyance of accuracy compared to quartz?

I used to obsess about accuracy, but when I realized I could regulate a mechanical watch (not even an expensive one) to be off by less than five seconds per day, then it was all mechanical for me. Not having to worry about the battery dying and knowing that a mechanical watch made by all metals parts can be serviced and repaired indefinitely just doesn't make a quartz watch all that attractive to me. I don't mind quartz watches one bit (I have several), but I find mechanical watches so much more attractive. The one on my wrist right now and that I've been wearing for the past month, a Hamilton Khaki Mechanical housing an ETA 2804-2, has on average been off by +0.1 seconds per day. It's even better than your average quartz watch I believe. Anyway, that kind of accuracy in a mechanical watch is pretty uncommon so don't expect it.

1 hour ago, spectre6000 said:

Mechanicals are about the craftsmanship and artistry, and a decent one is accurate enough to not matter in any practical way.

Couldn't agree more. Well spoken!

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46 minutes ago, VWatchie said:

Not having to worry about the battery dying and knowing that a mechanical watch made by all metals parts can be serviced and repaired indefinitely just doesn't make a quartz watch all that attractive to me.

Back at ya.

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I'm not much of a quartz person.  The 1 sec stopping seconds hand always makes me wonder if the battery is dead.  Yes, I do notice when something isn't moving and it should be, even if it is for less than 1 second.  I do have two watches with a VH31 movement which ticks 4 times per second.  I really like these. 

BUT, put yourself in the 1970's and the state of the computer industry.  The magnitude of making a computer small enough to run a watch is pretty impressive.  I have rebuilt a few Seiko 754x series.  Minus damage from leaking batteries, these things could last for 1000 years.  I'm sure older Swiss quartz are similar.  I've serviced $3 Miyota movements.  Why?  Because a technical guide was available and it was held together with screws so it was meant to be serviced.  It's kind of relaxing when you know you are out only a few dollars if you mess it up. 

I don't live my life such that 5-10 seconds a day off will change anything.  Some people are obsessed with accuracy and it makes them happy.  There are GPS corrected and synchronized watches for these people and I sure this technology brings them great joy.  Quartz vs. mechanical isn't a precise time keeping thing for me. 

Mechanical watches are my thing but an interesting quartz is always an option. 

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On 11/26/2021 at 11:06 AM, Dxnnis said:

My name is Dennis, I have always had some kind of watch but mechanicals have been something I just don't have any feel for, maybe it's the fear of damage or just the annoyance of accuracy compared to quartz?

I think you need to clarify what it is you like? Reason for the clarification is quartz typically comes in digital is typically all electronic zero or nearly zero mechanical components. Then there is analog quartz watches there is gears and setting parts like mechanical watches and interesting challenges that don't come up with mechanical watches.

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The deadbeat seconds complication prior to quartz watches would have been neat and interesting, but mostly just a "because" sort of thing. Then quartz watches came along. I'm not sure if the dead beat seconds is some sort of necessity for the device, or an affectation of a mechanical watch complication, but it is what it is.

If I'm checking out an interesting watch in the wild, the first thing I look at is whether or not it has a deadbeat second hand. If so, no further scrutiny required. I have seen a few high end watches with deadbeat seconds. It seems like a confident move. Sort of showing off via the opposite of showing off.

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On 11/29/2021 at 8:48 AM, JohnR725 said:

I think you need to clarify what it is you like? Reason for the clarification is quartz typically comes in digital is typically all electronic zero or nearly zero mechanical components. Then there is analog quartz watches there is gears and setting parts like mechanical watches and interesting challenges that don't come up with mechanical watches.

Sorry for that, I have a mix of analogue and digital and one ani/digital 24 in total. As for the reason why it's just the idea I suppose that quartz is for the most part more trouble free and just pick up and go (until the battery goes lol).

Have almost purchased a mechanical many times but something just holds me back, I used to ha e some mechanical watches when I was younger but everyone just broke on me and I suppose that has stuck with me to leave them alone probably.

Edited by Dxnnis
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On 11/29/2021 at 4:29 PM, spectre6000 said:

The deadbeat seconds complication prior to quartz watches would have been neat and interesting, but mostly just a "because" sort of thing. Then quartz watches came along. I'm not sure if the dead beat seconds is some sort of necessity for the device, or an affectation of a mechanical watch complication, but it is what it is.

If I'm checking out an interesting watch in the wild, the first thing I look at is whether or not it has a deadbeat second hand. If so, no further scrutiny required. I have seen a few high end watches with deadbeat seconds. It seems like a confident move. Sort of showing off via the opposite of showing off.

What do you mean by deadbeat seconds hand? Is it the one second tick?

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My early watches were hand wind or cheap quartz that ate batteries.  I was conditioned to think it was dead and needed winding or a battery when it stopped ticking.  When I look at a watch to check the time, I notice the hand not moving.  Even it it is less than the second it takes before it moves again.  I have to stare at it to make sure it is still working.  Seeing second hand movement at a glance reassures me that it is still working.  If you are used to a quartz, it's probably something you never considered.  Changing a battery took time and effort.  Winding a watch was a much quicker fix. 

I have had mechanicals that stopped for various faults so it's not an absolute. 

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I work on no end of both.  And I keep rediscovering that the more one knows about something, the more one can appreciate it.  
I specialize in antiques, and love to work on them.  There are many old mechanicals which can be made very accurate, and I respect that.  But as others have mentioned, for me it is also about the artistry.  I adore the ways that the watchmakers of the Victorian and Edwardian eras used to decorate the movements.  All the brushing on the nickel surface, the damaskeening, the engine turning, the fancy blackletter script of the maker's name, and so on.  And just the overall pride in craftsmanship that is so evident throughout many of them.
But I've also worked on really nice quartz movements.  The more I learn about the Accutron tuning fork regulated watches, the more I appreciate that level of precision.  And the Seiko kinetics are very impressive too, a sort of hybrid automatic-quartz with the oscillator charging the battery/capacitor.  I confess, I've learned to like working on those too.
I don't, however, get much thrill working on a run-of-the-mill, standard, battery-operated SMQ.  But I respect what they can do.  It's hard not to.  
So yes, for me, I like both.  But certainly in different ways.  Truthfully, the passion really comes out when I'm working on an old pocket watch.

Edited by KarlvonKoln
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1 hour ago, KarlvonKoln said:

And the Seiko kinetics are very impressive too, a sort of hybrid automatic-quartz with the oscillator charging the battery/capacitor. 

Did you know Seiko lost their mind and apparently kinetic Watches have been discontinued in favor of solar powered watches.

The first two links cover electric watches. First one mainly before courts with a couple a really old quartz watches. The second link has a little both.

https://electric-watches.co.uk/

http://www.crazywatches.pl/

The next link is interesting because the website is basically most of the contents of a book. On the top there's something this is click for contents. Then you get a list of what's in the book and on the website. Click each of the categories you get the text And at the bottom there will be a reference to a photograph. A very interesting book if you're into electric watches including quartz.

https://doensen.home.xs4all.nl/index.html

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