Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Quite a rare old watch lever set 18s running very well. 

Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Years of Operation: 1868-1886

Production Jewels: 7-19 Jewels

Production Sizes: 18s, 16s, 8-6s

Total Production: ~12,000

Factory Building Status: Demolished

16136244961868152587932323408971.jpg

16136245422826017540914347916052.jpg

16136245658829010604463788945840.jpg

Edited by Graziano
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Lovely damaskeened full-plate movement there!  And the case and watch-overall are rather pretty.  It's a shame the dial sustained a bit of damage, but still pleasant to tell time by.  I like it. So glad it still runs. 

Edited by KarlvonKoln
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Similar Content

    • By Extractor
      After having experimented with some very cheap watches I thought it was time to attempt something a little nicer. Bought this silver pocket watch and took it apart. Noticed quite a few of the jewels were shattered so is likely to be beyond my skill set at the moment to restore anyway. Despite that, I decided, probably unwisely, to examine the mainspring and measure it up for a replacement so rendering it useless in the process.
      The measurement I have taken are: 
      Height: 2.6mm Thickness 0.2mm Length: 520mm ID of barrel: 16.5mm Type TR Then I find out there is no replacement to be found in the TR book which I accessed through the Cousins website. Am I not looking properly or have I made a big mistake in assuming a replacement could be found?
      Many thanks.


    • By thecodedawg
      I recently acquired an Illinois pocket watch that appears to have a screw on front and back. I was able to unscrew the front with great effort.  A lot of dirt and grime dropped out.  I need to get the back off.  There are no grab points so, I have tried a rubber ball and failed.  If it was a bolt, I would use heat, but that’s not an option.  I am afraid to use penetrating oil for fear of damaging the porcelain face.  I am assuming that the watch is in the 100 year old range but won’t know until I get the serial number off the movement.  
       
      it is clear, the case has not been opened in a very long time.
       
      What is the best way to open it?
       
    • By GoMSUSpartans
      Looking for advice.  Daughter (7) bought me a pocket watch from a second hand store.  The hunter case crown is missing a cap to open the front. It appears to be threaded.  Essinger seems to have the right replacement part. I can't figure out how to get the stem and crown out. I think this is an old Belle Suisse 8810. Help?  Also I know it is posted to wrong forum but this was the only non grayed out option.

    • By AdamC
      Hello,
      I have a lovely antique cylinder escapement pocket watch that I've serviced and got running beautifully but now I have a problem with the minute hand falling off. I think it's known as a pin hole fitting hand. On measuring the hand it shows approx. 0.40mm, and then on measuring the arbor diameter with the vernier guage, it's also 0.40mm so it's very near but won't even grip when mounted. Photos provided of the job.
      Does anybody have a technique I can use to get the hand to fit?


    • By Bill3
      I am working on an Elgin pocket watch grade 312.  It was an estate sale purchase and was not running when purchased.  I assumed that it was not running because it was very dirty and thought cleaning would solve all the problems.  I completely disassembled it and ran it through an ultrasound cleaner and rinse. It came out bright and shiny and when I started to reassemble for the first time I saw that there was NO roller jewel!  
      So, what now? Can the roller jewel be replaced by a person with very modest ability?  I am including two pictures of the balance and roller plate.  I do not see any sign of where it was attached.  
      Thanks in advance for any guidance.  
      Bill H.


  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I think Earl Gray is an acquired taste. I hated it when I first tried it. Now I find it tolerable. Eventually I might find it ok. 😂 But what do you think of tea used in confections and other foods. Like matcha cakes 😖, Earl Gray cheesecake 🤪, duck smoked with tea leaves 🤔, etc...?
    • Hello Not really a watch question, however I thought I would it it a try. I have a couple of Silver Beer Mugs that are tarnished and all I have to clean them with is the L & R Ultrasonic Watch Cleaning Solution (ammoniated) and a ultrasonic machine. I also have the L & R Ultrasonic Watch Cleaning Solution and an Ultrasonic machine. Does anyone know if I can use these two products on the silver beer mugs or should I get another type of cleaner> Also should I be diluting the cleaning and rinse solutions?  Thanks in advance for any help that can be provided. Michael
    • Hi JDM - Thanks for the detailed reply. The Bezel only looks like a rotating time ring, but it's just a "faux" divers watch, only rated to 50m. I think the Seiko "Solar Power" version actually had a rotating ring and Tritium on the hands and numbers and was rated to 200m or something. But, the bezel is fixed. Also, there are no "indent" or any indication that you could use a Snap Back knife to open the bezel. If this is not indeed a screw off bezel (using a screw type base wrench), then a 4 blade bezel tool is likely the only thing that will remove it. Then I'll need to figure out how the stem is removed so I can remove the whole movement to get to the Cap which I assume is underneath. Other owners on some other watch forums have reported the same experience I had with my Lorus/ Seiko 851 model, the Capacitor fails after only 8 to 10 years and nothing like the "promised" 80 years (Life Time Warranty they refuse to obey). Quite a few owners wrote that they had the Capacitor replaced, but no details on HOW. Read my response above to "watchweasol". There's been some conflict about which capacitor to use as well since the original 2023 24T / MT920 was discontinued 30 years ago (probably the reason all these Lorus Solar watch never met the 80-year promise. Supposedly the replacement Cap is a 3023 24T now. The word in some forums is that this Maxell Cap will last 30 to 40 years. The Seiko Kenetic watches supposedly also use this same Capacitor. Have you ever worked on the Seiko Solar version of this Lorus? Thanks.    
    • @watchweasol - I  know that was the Seiko "company line" for both the Seiko and Lorus branded "Solar Power" versions, but there are an awful lot of folks that bought both and found the Capacitor died, like mine, only after 8 to 10 years and did have the Capacitor replaced with at first the original 2023 24T version and then the 3023 24T, which is apparently a much longer lived replacement. Seiko's "promise" of an 80-year life for this Capacitor was all hooey and likely the reason Seiko quickly dropped both their own branded model and the Lorus ones after just 10 years on the market. Both Seiko and Lorus (who is no longer in North America) refuse to honor the "life time" warranty. One of the reasons I now trust Casio more than Seiko for warranty promises. The movement in the Lorus is literally the exact same one that was in the 3 "Solar Power" Seiko mens models, a Seiko NA tech admitted that to me almost 30 years ago when mine stopped charging. I bought it new in 1986 or 87, and I still have the original paper manual and box and "Life Time Warranty" card (good for nuthin'). I've been a watch and clock "collector" since a teenager, prefer early American pocket watches, but who doesn't love early American MADE and Japanese and Swiss made wristwatches? So I've also collected all the tools a watch and clock tech uses, many pretty vintage too, and learned how to work to a certain degree on most any watch or clock, restoring and fixing, to my limits. I already have that (another version) Bezel removing tool, am just trying to confirm that the bezel is NOT a screw on, or absolutely IS a press-fit. Was hoping to find someone that has either worked on the Lorus version or the sort of same looking Seiko versions that also had the one-piece "tub" body. The Bezel only looks like a rotating time ring, but it's just a "faux" divers watch, only rated to 50m. I think the Seiko version actually had a rotating ring and Tritium on the hands and numbers and was rated to 200m or something. This Lorus/Seiko is an odd-ball and there is absolutely no repair info on them, so that makes me want to fix it more myself.
    • Very, very nice production.  Really outstanding walkthrough!
×
×
  • Create New...