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A fifth clock that I had forgotten about


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It is old. The chip in the top right happened somewhere between living in Brisbane in Queensland and then Gove in the Northern Territory.

I might see if I can match the plastic with some other plastic and glue a piece in. Will be hard to match the colour from ageing.

I opened the back up today and was amazed at the movement and the music box section. Both in amazing condition.

Some rust on the movement mainspring and the hairspring looks quite conical so not sure what is going on there. The mainspring is almost fully wound but no life. I added some more torque to the barrel by way of my thumb and I could get the balance to oscillate. Take my thumb off and it quits again.

So maybe this one first and then the Hettich.

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A standard 30 hour movement, didn't expect to much being a seiko clock, seiko watch movements are good can't say much about their clocks. If you mean this pivot hole then yes it does look as if its worn.

IMG_0746.thumb.JPG.a917ffa9bf32e4ad3a89bd3a5e425300.jpg

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Oh well, sooner learn bushing on this than the Hettich.
Now just have to find out how to order bushes as I don’t have a lathe to make my own. 

Edited by Michael1962
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I am happy that I was able to spot something this early in the piece. I have some awls that have very sharp points to them.

Gently pushed the pinion over and the movement jumped to life.

Have let down the mainspring completely, so this will be number #1.

I will post pictures as I go.

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Hi again,

I have been thinking about the pivot hole that I have already identified that I need to rebus. I will be rebushing by hand and from reading on here, there is two ways to ream out the plate for the bush.

Let's see if I get this right.

1) @oldhippy Carefully ream by hand centreing on the original pivot hole until the wear area is gone. Size to just under bush diameter, (I don't know what size interference is considered correct?), small chamfer on 'outside' of the movement plate, insert bush until flush on 'outside' of plate. Remove any excess bush on the 'inside' of the plate, (I am still thinking of ways to do this neatly?), ream to correct size to suit pivot, Chamfer on 'outside' of bush to create oil sink.

2) File to same 'size' opposite to pivot hole wear, ream to size for bush. Proceed as above.

While I have needle files, they are not up to the task for this as they are too big. Normal mechanical needle files from an auto shop.

Are diamond needle files decidedly smaller/finer?

The other question is how are bush kits specified? I have seen different 'series' kits, but am not sure what I should be getting my hands on?

Then there is the question of reamers and/or broaches?

 

Edited by Michael1962
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Must say this was a surprise I was expecting an electric movement. With regards to bushing the key to bushing either by hand or using a bushing tool is to fit the new bushing in its original position. If you look at the worn hole it will be in an oval in shape. File or (broach over) the hole so that the wear is the same as the other side before making the hole for the new bushing.

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Bushing is something I've yet to attempt although there's an awful lot of talk and info on the subject so I'm keen to see how you get on - keep us posted and plenty of pics please.

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Hi Michael  If you are going to do some bushing  a read at the following link will provide you with some good information  https://www.davewestclocks.co.uk/Bushing.clock.plates.htm    With that Seikosha clock the plates will be relativly thin compared with the better quality clocks and as such will require a light hand. all the previous advice given is good.  When you have done the bushing fit the wheel and is neighbour and verify that they mesh together ok.  Oh  I nearly forgot when the bush is fitted and you are broaching it out for the pivot try the fit regularly, when the pivot is in the hole the tilt of the wheel should be around 2 degrees from the verticle.     all the best

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A clock reamer/ broach is the same thing, some repairs say a reamer has two sides cutting, a broach has 5 sides. I always use the five sided. You won’t find a bush the same thickness as the plate in fact these movements are not meant to be re bushed in there day they were throw away movements. You need to find a bush with a slightly smaller hole then the pivot if you can, smaller is better than large, you can always make it bigger but you can’t make it smaller, Don’t bother to much about the meshing as the pivots are just round wires, it’s not like a wheel with solid pinions. You could file the bush to the plate’s thickness if you so wish or leave it sticking out a bit; no one is going to see it. As long as it has an oil sink it will be just fine. Always test the running of the wheel making sure it is free and has end shake, run the next wheel with it, screw the plates up and test turn the plates about to different positions the wheel should keep running if not then the end shake is wrong or the hole is too tight. I think that has just about covered it. Any questions there are many here that are only too willing to help

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4 hours ago, clockboy said:

Must say this was a surprise I was expecting an electric movement. With regards to bushing the key to bushing either by hand or using a bushing tool is to fit the new bushing in its original position. If you look at the worn hole it will be in an oval in shape. File or (broach over) the hole so that the wear is the same as the other side before making the hole for the new bushing.

As I was reading this thread, the question in my head was "how do I maintain center for the new bushing?"  Your solution is great...and simple.  My head was off measuring and recording the center from all four sides of the plate...ugh.

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