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Hello all!

I'm new to the forum and new to watch collecting and repairing but have watched many of Mark's videos and those of others to give myself a grounding in the art.

I bought my first vintage watch last year and have been purchasing elderly but decent watches ever since. I'll post my collection in the appropriate section in case anyone's interested. The criterion with me is largely the price, as I'm on a state pension, but I enjoy stylish as well as worthy veterans, which may not all be of collector quality in terms of appearance. I've also discovered that there are some excellent watches in excellent cosmetic condition to be had for pocket-money and that's where I sit until the lottery win turns up.

 

My two latest acquisitions are Favre-Leubas, for which I've developed a penchant. One is a 1970s Sea Chief in a gold-plated case with gold dial and black and gold hands and batons. This is very clean inside and undamaged outside but is a non-runner, purportedly from overwinding, but I think it was a non-runner before it got overwound. We'll see. I've attached a pic of the movement.

 

The other is a Duomatic (AS1916) that has a day/date problem - maybe the wrong stem - but I'll put both of these and any others that have problems in the appropriate section. I'm hoping that some of you will hold my hand as I venture into disassembling, cleaning and (hopefully) reassembling these watches.

 

One other thing I've done recently is to recase an older Omega. I bought it (a Cal.601) in a gold-plated case that was pretty ropey. I found a NOS SS case on a well-known auction site and sourced a new crystal, crown and stem, all now fitted. I'm dying to wear it but I want to get it serviced or service it myself before I start using it regularly.

 

I hope to make some new friends on here and improve my knowledge and skills through your input.

Thanks

John

 

post-742-0-29600500-1425598908_thumb.jpg

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A very warm welcome to the forum from way up North, and thank you for taking the time to write an excellent and informative introduction. As Morten has said, this is an excellent hobby and a wonderful profession. I too am a hobbiest, but be warned, it can become very addictive. There is such a variety of old time pieces out there waiting to be found and restored, and so much to learn on the subject of horology, that it could keep you interested for ever.

When you get around to servicing your watches, please post your progress on the forum, I for one look forward to hearing about it. :)

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Hi John - and a belated welcome from me. I also scour the sites for "stylish and worthy veterans" at good prices. The Favre-Leuba movements are interesting with their twin power movements and, coincidentally, I also have an Omega cal. 601 in a case which has lost some of its gold plate - on the bezel. I've been contemplating sourcing a new case for it but, on the whole, it looks quite passable when worn.

 

If you go to my watch pages - link below - you'll see some of the bits and bobs I've collected over the years.

 

Cheers,

 

Will

Edited by WillFly
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Is that a Triton I see for your avatar Geo?

Hi John, no not a Triton.

That was my 1958 Norton that I bought as a standard Dommie 99 back in 1967. I was continually modifying it and the picture shows it in 1970 fitted with a 750 Atlas motor and a few wee extras. :)

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Hi Will!

Hardly a belated welcome - I posted less than twelve hours ago! :-)

I shall follow your link with pleasure and see whether we coincide beyond the Omega. I'd offer you the bezel if it were any good but the gold is literally peeling off. I'm going to experiment with electrolysis and see if I can't unplate it, polish it up and replate it. Or maybe I'll plate something else. I have two more Omegas, a cal.286 Seamaster and a cal.610 which has nothing on the dial beyond the Omega name. As we go along, and I get some pics uploaded, maybe someone will be able to tell me more about these. All three Omegas are gold-plated, which seems to be the least desirable and thus cheaper option. I must say though, the gold numerals, batons and hands on the cal.601 sit very well with the stainless steel case.

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Welcome John, most of the guys on this forum a very keen hobbyists but we also have a good sprinkling of pro,s too. This combination is perfect for a beginner and the wealth of knowledge available at times is outstanding. No matter how small the problem or how trivial it seems post it, trust me we have all been there at some time. Enjoy.

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Thanks Bob.

That's a Twin Power movement so even if one spring was broken I think it would probably go. I've managed to let the springs down from being so tight that there was no more wind and I've wound the watch a few turns, alas without success. I'll try demagnetising before anything else.

I have a feeling that this watch may have sat in a drawer for a long time so maybe the lube is all dried out and causing resistance. Any suggestions as to what else might make it reluctant to go? The balance and pallet are free.

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Don't hold your breath! I'm still trying to pluck up the courage to start taking it to bits. Plus I'm waiting on a new 0.5 screwdriver to remove dial screws. Just ordered a cheap Chinese set and some Bergeon blades to go in them.

As to lubrication, how many different oils/greases do I need as a minimum? I see that Mark uses a number of different products in his videos but can I get away with some 10w30 and a pot of Castrolube?

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At a minimum, I would have moebius 9010 and 8200 also some D5 or Hp1300. If the watches/movements are just for practice, I'd substitute those by some silicon 100 and novostar products but I haven't tried those so it is only a guess. To seal the case and lube the gaskets silicon grease is necessary (either the Seiko or the anchor). Check out our lube posts, they are very informative.

 

The 0.5 screwdriver is too small for general work and can break/bend easily if using as a lever (not recommended for any size). I'd rather spend good money in a bergeon or horotec set and get it done with. You'll find that the actual Chinese screwdriver body might not be the best for the bergeon tips (tip off center, wobbly, etc) and some refitting might have to be done (which is time and money in the long run). You'll never be completely satisfied in the end but done well it will last. For most watch work I believe a range between .80 and 1.4 is most useful.

 

An ultrasonic and the right fluids is also recommended along with fine optics and lighting. Needless to say that how and where you work is very important too. There are several on line classes you can benefit from while attempting to fix a watch and of course this forum which have an incredible amount of information and helpful people.

 

So, you see, you can tackle your watches without a worry considering the above!

 

Cheers,

 

Bob

Edited by bobm12
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Thanks for the info and encouragement Bob.

I guess you're right about the 0.5 blades, which I already had, but I ordered 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0mm blades at the same time as the Chinese handles so should cover all the bases.

It looks like I'll have to bite the bullet re the lubes and silicone - and I thought paying £13 a litre for motor oil was hard to swallow! :-)

I should be able to source an ultrasonic cleaner for not too much and I suggested on another thread about one of us with a business maybe ordering some samples of the LED worklight direct from the manufacturer. I'd sign up for one if there's any of you in the UK who'd consider this.

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At a minimum, I would have moebius 9010 and 8200 also some D5 or Hp1300.Bob

Would I be doing my watches a disservice by using D5 instead of HP1300 as there's a clear difference in price? (Cousins) Also, does HP 1300 replace the lower numbered HP lubes?

Thanks chaps!

Edited by clockwatcher
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I have recently started to use HP oils and am impressed. I like the fact they are dyed red so you can clearly see the amount applied. I have also noticed ETA have updated their tech sheets and also recommend HP oils.

If you want to start a fight ask a horologist what lubricants should be used.

D5 & 9010 have been used successfully for many years so I see no reason why not to use them. On high grade watches then go to the HP's

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