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jdrichard

Hamilton GMT Hands Changing

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I am having a problem clearly seeing the time on my Hamilton Jazzmaster Traveler 2, as the hand color is not at all in contrast with the face of the watch. Where can I source the proper hands and would there be an issue re-handing this watch.3746b37249d051c2b07404ec69423a0f.png695c89489da8a83e4b45d3ac1fbd8e4b.png

 

 

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The watch is based on an ETA 2893-2 movement -- I have that watch, too. There are plenty of handsets for that movement on eBay for $15 ~ $25, but I'd have to agree with oldhippy. A fine brush and small jar of enamel paint from the local hobby shop (assuming one is open, now) is a $3 investment for exactly what you want.

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The watch is based on an ETA 2893-2 movement -- I have that watch, too. There are plenty of handsets for that movement on eBay for $15 ~ $25, but I'd have to agree with oldhippy. A fine brush and small jar of enamel paint from the local hobby shop (assuming one is open, now) is a $3 investment for exactly what you want.

But no lume


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Yes ithink you are right as a contrast to the stainless steel a nice dark blue would be perfect.  The good thing id if you dont like it you can always clean it off.  There used to be a chemical used for blueing gun barrels that would make a nice dark metalic blue.

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1 hour ago, jdrichard said:


But no lume


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It doesn't have any now, and the lume on that watch is pretty weak to begin with. In any case, the problem I can see is the hole for the GMT hand is 1.8 mm and it's current length is around 8 mm. Most GMT hands with a 1.8 mm hole are 13 mm and up. The GMT Jazzmaster has that rotating chapter ring that would start interfering with the hands at about 14 mm. 

This is my take on what that kind of mod might look like.

 

If you're okay with that, it's a $4 purchase. https://www.esslinger.com/alarm-calendar-gmt-and-24-hour-watch-movement-hands/

hamilton-mod.jpg

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luminox.jpg.37a39ab2a8ec329febcb4845b96b5bce.jpg

9 hours ago, jdrichard said:


I will screw that up for sure


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I agree with Old Hippie.  I have an old Luminox that I wore when I was in the field (electrician).  The only metal is the crown and clasp.  I took a short length of #12AWG wire, which is made up of many finer strands, and curled the wire to create a base/pedestal, stripped off about 1/2" of insulation, and separated the strands into, sort-of the spokes of a half-opened umbrella, sort of V shaped.  I placed each hand on a strand, manipulated until I had the hands with the visible faces upright and horizontal, placed on a piece of large newspaper, and hit the gold hands with black spraypaint with very light, quick swipes.  Repeated until the hands were colored, and voila.  Didn't even have to broach the holes.  A look at the watch now, you'd never know the hands didn't come black. 

 

Don't see why you couldn't do the same.  

Edited by SparkyLB

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