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Hello Scott. Hope you do not mind me reviving your thread.

I recently got a pair of venus 170 movements for a bargain, U$40. One of them is completely rusted and does not have the main parts and springs. The other one is only missing the stem and one spring.

I intend to practise on those until I get some skills to take care of my first watch. A venus 175 which I find beautiful and would like to keep forever. 40c1b484f20ae044a8f1f9faeb0a4e5d.jpg84e78e6470057489d09566584a4b4c79.jpg

 

Here are pictures of my junk pieces, one rusted, the other already dismantled. And the untouched 175.

I will be following your steps, helped by esembl-o-graf and Mark’s videos.

 

Have you had any more fun with your 170?

Lastly,

Do you think the Hairspring in the last picture can be reused?

Cheers! f97b9f5e7d63835ad1a8e7d0cef2f0fe.jpg

 

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Right, I just thought that condensing related subjects would add to organization. I sometimes get lost on the multitude of subjects. Besides, Scott's thread was a pleasure to follow. 

Here are my pictures: two venus 170, one just for parts, if I get rid of the rust.  The other maybe fixable, already in pieces. Screws were kept at their places, as advised.  

My 175, gaining a few minutes per day, despite demagnetization. Surely needs servicing, but I refrain to touch it.

Then the questions:

What would you use to clean the rust in such an extreme case? Emery paper? Fiberglass?

Second hairspring does not have stud. Is it usable still? 

 

 

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Assuming the hairspring is the right strength for the balance it should work just fine once studded.  You'll have to adjust the length to get the timing just right though and that can be a fiddly job.

Beautiful Venus 175- it looks like it's from the 30's or 40's. :)

When it comes rust remediation I keep a few strips of 600 to 1000 grit paper in the workbench; for flat surfaces (most of the chronograph levers) one or two glides against the paper is enough.  A fiberglass pen sometimes works for those hard to get places.  A bit of vinegar will remove rust too but you've got to be really careful- soak too long and it will eat into the steel as well.  I believe there's a thread around here where someone used Sodium Carbonate for electrolytic rust removal.  I haven't tried that yet.

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Thanks RyMoeller, I will then sand the pieces, preserving all the surfaces that touch other pieces. (these I will burnish with something) I ordered D5 and 8000 oil and grease, should be fine for the level of work I do. 

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13 hours ago, marcoskaiser said:

Thanks RyMoeller, I will then sand the pieces, preserving all the surfaces that touch other pieces. (these I will burnish with something) I ordered D5 and 8000 oil and grease, should be fine for the level of work I do. 

It would be a good idea to get a caliper for measurement if you don't have one already.  When I hear the verb "sand" I immediately think of the material being removed.  It doesn't take much work to change the dimensions of a part enough for it to become non-functional.  ;o)

Good luck with your project!  :)

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Hello marcoskaiser,

How is your Venus 170 practice going?   Sorry for the delayed response, I moved recently and am still unpacking and getting the workshop set up.  Before the move I got sidetracked on Omega bumpers, but I do need to revisit that 170.  The pinion on the second wheel is slipping; pretty sure it's wear on the shaft of the second wheel as tightening the friction fit of the pinion didn't work.  But to replace that second wheel pretty much requires another complete disassembly.

Hi Ry!

Best wishes,

Scott

PS that 175 is a beaut!

Edited by ScottMcAfee
typo

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Hello marcoskaiser,
How is your Venus 170 practice going?   Sorry for the delayed response, I moved recently and am still unpacking and getting the workshop set up.  Before the move I got sidetracked on Omega bumpers, but I do need to revisit that 170.  The pinion on the second wheel is slipping; pretty sure it's wear on the shaft of the second wheel as tightening the friction fit of the pinion didn't work.  But to replace that second wheel pretty much requires another complete disassembly.
Hi Ry!
Best wishes,
Scott
PS that 175 is a beaut!

Hello Scott!
I have been dismantling and re-assembling the dead 170 many times (i think 8) trying to memorize the parts and sequence. There is another enthusiast beginner on watchuseek, Michal, who even made some springs.
We exchanged parts, and now need to get a case. Or make one. Don’t know which is more difficult.
I recently won a lot on ebay, and got really delicate tools for the job of fixing the hairspring (and 3! Of those tools for clamping and heating parts, if anyone is interested-i will offer those somewhere on this forum for free) Although obviously it is too early to succeed on fixing hairsprings, little by little the exercise of fixing and making tools is helping my touch.
Have you ever used the leveling tools?


The 175 is in a green strap now, waiting to be cared for one day..d86494061cd014a3c61bae9101c08bc4.jpgacecaa714f0d4ef6315315fc26ab036f.pnga80929a58764fc417e91ee183ac8de95.png

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I"m still very much still a newbie and don't know what a "leveling tool" for watches even is.  For the hairspring work, I just used a couple of tweezers, a pane of glass, and many hours.  I'd be comfortable making minor tweaks now.  But the big thing I learned was to steer well clear of the hairspring at all times.  :)

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    • By ScottMcAfee
      This will be more of a stumble-through than a walkthrough, since it's my first watch disassembly (and hopefully reassembly).  I plan to do it as a series by replying to this post, so I can get feedback and help as I go (if anybody is interested).  I hope that's OK (it will be slow going).  I couldn't find any walkthroughs of a Venus 170, so at least I'll contribute some pictures with what I learned along the way.
      The watch:  Purchased from goodwill online.  Broken/yellowed crystal, hands bent, corrosion on the case and chrono buttons, dial very marred.  Some power in it, as pressing the button moved the chrono second hand until it bumped against the main minute hand, which was bent.  Main second hand bent to the dial as well.  I did not wind the crown.  Balance oscillates.
      Watch arrived with the back off.  Crystal removed with tweezers, and hands removed with the movement still in the case so I wouldn't damage them by fumbling around.  Once I had the case screws out I was expecting a movement ring, but there was none.  I figured out the case has a bezel and the movement comes out the front.   Couldn't find my bench knife but the bezel came off easy with some pressure from a screwdriver at a gap near the 2oc lug.  Once the movement was out I was expecting dial screws on the side, but there were none, so I had to learn about dog screws and figured out their locations by studying the backs of cal. 170 dials for sale on ebay.

      Note the chrono bridge looks unlike any other pictures of a 170 I've found online (including the one other Empire 170 I found), and it's not stamped.  Venus logo is not on the balance, but on the other side of the movement (see attached).  Perhaps this will help date the movement?
      Here are the results of these first steps with additional pics attached.







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