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Titus 23 jewel Golden Leaf - any idea what decade this is from


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Hey guys, I've got a weird one here, see pics below

2147372525__DSF0473(2).thumb.JPG.ec81bf823e9dbc8685fcb207d36c509d.JPG

I'm thinking 60's but it uses the FHF66-9 movement (quite a pretty adjusted movement, hence my interest) that's apparently from the 50's?

_DSF0470-3.thumb.jpg.fddf97dabb8a3ad4a339ba3f06a564c9.jpg

There's no info on the interwebs that I can find, but this appears to certainly be before it was sold to an Asian company.

If anyone knows a little something about this piece or any other interesting facts I'd be grateful.

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Truth be told, I haven’t started stripping it at all. I’m considering it for a video project and was curious to find out a little more about it. The fact that it’s an adjusted movement and that it was tarted up made me think there’s a little more to it than I initially thought. Solvil et Titus has a fascinating history and it would appear this watch was part of the last of their work prior to being sold in the 70’s.

Edit: I’m also thinking that the addition of a date complication is something that wasn’t that common in the 50’s and all other pictures of Titus watches I’ve managed to find don’t feature any complications at all. So I’m thinking 60’s, but that’s a wild guess. I was hoping for a little confirmation of this though

Edited by gbyleveldt
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4 hours ago, gbyleveldt said:

Truth be told, I haven’t started stripping it at all. I’m considering it for a video project and was curious to find out a little more about it. The fact that it’s an adjusted movement and that it was tarted up made me think there’s a little more to it than I initially thought. Solvil et Titus has a fascinating history and it would appear this watch was part of the last of their work prior to being sold in the 70’s.

Edit: I’m also thinking that the addition of a date complication is something that wasn’t that common in the 50’s and all other pictures of Titus watches I’ve managed to find don’t feature any complications at all. So I’m thinking 60’s, but that’s a wild guess. I was hoping for a little confirmation of this though

Eyup Gert . Yes fascinating history , just been having a little read up on it. Its original Swiss founder in the early 1890s paul ditisheim, a very clever guy by all accounts even at a very young age. His family owned the Vulcain watch company where he started out and then went on to have  his own company, solvil et titus . Solvil an abbreviation of a name of a villiage in Jura that was home to watch factories and Titus the roman emperor.  Also his own name on his dials. Inventive with chronometer developments making very accurate quality timepieces and won prestigious awards for his designs. Sold to a Paul Vogel in 1930 a very astute entrepreneur that continued to make the company successful. In the 1950s shifted ideas to produce cheaper watches aimed at mass markets but also still produced the same quality watches that the company had always made under the solvil name. He aquired the Waltham watch company in the late 60s and also had dealings with Elgin in the early 70s . Seeing  more scope for his company's production sent his son into Asian  territory to make that happen then his son also Paul Vogel finially sold out to a Hong Kong company. Titus models include a 21 Jewel deluxe, i didnt see any examples with day date comps. on these. And a 25 and 30 jewel Royal Time models both with day date, these were listed as 1950s watches. Unfortunately no info on the movements used ( well maybe if i looked a little harder but it is 1.30 in the morning ) . Hope some of this of any use to you Gert. The guy to ask would be Watchmaker, a thoroughly nice bloke with amazing knowledge.  

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  • 2 weeks later...

Well, I did do a service on this one and I must say it was fun. For those chasing amplitude, this one clocked in at just under 300deg after I was done and I was pretty gobsmacked by such performance on a 60’ish  year old movement with the original main spring.

I did a video on it for those that are interested:

Vintage Titus Swiss Watch Service - full of old oil!
https://youtu.be/DNNjndqLbAM

Edited by gbyleveldt
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