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Smiths Sandiville Mantel Clock


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Just received my Smiths Sandiville mantel clock a couple of days ago.

Quite good condition generally but not running. The Westminster chime is all messed up also. This will probably keep me busy for a few weeks.

There is another clock that just came up on ebay. It's for a good cause too. Proceeds go to East Anglia's Children Hospices. Really tempted to get this also. Unless one of you guys outbid me. :thumbsu:

https://www.ebay.com.sg/itm/Art-Deco-Mantel-Clock-Smiths-With-Chimes/402360864848?hash=item5dae939050:g:-wsAAOSwAHlfNAfW

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Have fun repairing that one. You are in the right place if you need help. Just looked at the other one, hope you get that one too and good luck. 

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9 hours ago, watchweasol said:

Hi Hector   I suppose you checked the cat was'nt in side the clock:Da big Ginger one with a wide grin  (cheshire cat)

Nope. I checked. No such luck.

I miss my cats in spite the damage and mayhem they caused. :(

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Those must be like the two most common problems with mantel clocks or something.  When I got my Linden 8-day, same things: broken pendulum suspension  and random white cat hairs scattered throughout. 

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I got the clock stripped down to the 3 gear trains. Tomorrow I'll separate the plates and remove all the wheels.

What would be a good cleaning solution for clocks? I've used dishwashing liquid and turpentine before. Ended up removing a lot of lacquer from the brass. 

If I decide to polish and re-lacquer the plates, how do I go about doing that? 

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Hi Hector  depending on how dirty the movement is   I usually give it a good scrub down with either Petrol  or white spirit and oil.  The old way of polishing the plates was with a brush charged from a chalk block (still available)  when dried and pegged out.     all bearings/pivots checked . Reassemble and lubricate with Windles clock oil  its the best .     all the best.

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Yes I have a Webster.

But while adjusting the retainer ring, disaster struck. The end of the mainspring slipped off the barrel hook and slipped into the ring. Now I don't know how I'm going to get the mainspring out without the end of the spring sticking out. :phew:20200821_222715.thumb.jpg.25ff7b131188f0811ef8e2d8b0eeaef9.jpg

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Yup. All there. Thanks.

I've cleaned everything and am ready to reassemble. I noticed that on the chime train, there are 2 wheels with a pin sticking out. Do I need to align or synchronize these in any way?

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Do clocks have tech sheets like watches, like the ones watchweasol always supplies so generously?

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Make sure this wheel is about in this place, the same on the strike side, you will probably need to  make adjustments when all the wheels are fitted. On the strike side the hammer lifting lever needs to be away from the star wheel, that is the one that lifts the hammers. 

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When you put in the lever through the hole in the plate that hooks over that pin, the other pin needs to be in the position that I said. Sorry I forgot to mention that.

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Hi Hector  there is not a lot in the way of tech sheets for clocks, Two good books  the clock repairers manual by Mick Watters  and the clock repairers handbook by Laurie Pennman good reference books. and Donald De Carles book practical clock repairing.

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I managed to get the going train running again last night. It was still going this morning despite the broken suspension spring. 

I will work on the chime and strike tonight.

I now find clocks so much more interesting than watches. There are so many different types. They are less strain on the eyes, no need to get on your hands and knees with a magnet in one hand and a flashlight in the other. No need to wait for a "shake free" day to work on delicate things like hairspring adjustments or pallet jewel replacement. But they are a whole lot more dangerous to work on.

I guess the WRT community will be polarized on opinion. :D

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