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Hello,

My Seiko 5 just showed up, from Amazon Canada.  I'm a bit disappointed the movement is stamped "Malaysia" I did not do enough diligence to realize I was buying the Malaysian model.  Not a big deal it was only meant to wear at work and take apart into tiny pieces.

I'm just wondering if someone can please explain HOW the crown jams the second hand when slowly reversing the minute hand.  If anyone is familiar with the mechanics involved in accomplishing this please describe what happens, thanks a lot.

I understand how to perform the procedure I am not sure how it works inside though. 

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1 hour ago, eric9000k said:

My Seiko 5 just showed up, from Amazon Canada.  I'm a bit disappointed the movement is stamped "Malaysia" I did not do enough diligence to realize I was buying the Malaysian model. 

There is no Seiko 5 "Malasyan model". All Seiko 5 are manufactured in factories outside Japan. If you want a Made in Japan Seiko you can get something like an SKX007J or a. SARB watch that are a mix of proveniences but can legally show that. For a brand new, fully Japan made piece you have to scale up further, perhaps not to Grand Seiko levels, but above $1,000 for sure. 

I recommend against you taking your new watch to tinyi parts but to read here instead about what is best for a beginner to learn on. 

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Canon pinion is too tight, if you did take apart, first oil the canon, refit and advance the hands couple of turns around the clock to spread the oil, it should loosen up, if it didn't you may have to broach the canon. 

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2 hours ago, eccentric59 said:

When you slowly turn the crown backwards in setting position, you are actually applying an opposite force to the train of wheels through the cannon pinion to take enough force from the mainspring power to stop the movement. It doesn't jam the works.

 

Terrific I understand this thanks!  That's why it feels like the second hand responds proportionally to the amount of force applied like it slows stops or even reverses.  I appreciate the fast answer to my question.

 

1 hour ago, jdm said:

There is no Seiko 5 "Malasyan model". All Seiko 5 are manufactured in factories outside Japan. If you want a Made in Japan Seiko you can get something like an SKX007J or a. SARB watch that are a mix of proveniences but can legally show that. For a brand new, fully Japan made piece you have to scale up further, perhaps not to Grand Seiko levels, but above $1,000 for sure. 

I recommend against you taking your new watch to tinyi parts but to read here instead about what is best for a beginner to learn on. 

Well the SKX in my opinion is completely overrated but the case is lovely I'll just get the case aftermarket along with a sapphire crystal and build a custom skx, this seems to be a very cool and popular thing to do!  What I can't figure out is if the 6R15 is the best choice for this and what dial options I"ll be able to use.

Any way about whether Seikos are made in Japan and the 7s26 is a good movement to learn on, well ok I appreciate your words of wisdom but it's going to be taken apart sooner or later.:sword: 

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10 minutes ago, eric9000k said:

it's going to be taken apart sooner or later.

If this is your first movement, you can pretty much count on either breaking or losing something. ;)  Fortunately parts are fairly easy to get.

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18 minutes ago, eccentric59 said:

If this is your first movement, you can pretty much count on either breaking or losing something. ;)  Fortunately parts are fairly easy to get.

I should really clarify I'm not trying to swim upstream, I'm a beginner collector

and an aspiring hobbyist with respect to watchmaking.

So I'm all for using the correct tools and beginner's movement.  I didn't mean to imply otherwise.

This thing just came in the mail a few hours ago I'm still trying to wind it.:hot:

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2 minutes ago, eccentric59 said:

Um ... that movement doesn't hand wind. You're going to have to use an auto winder or shake the thing for 20 minutes.

That's what I'm talking about.  It was a joke!  mY fiRSt wAtcH jOke

have a good day thank you for explaining what I was asking about earlier.

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Actually it was my second watch joke since the movement doesn't actually have "hacking" either so the use of the word hack was obviously a double entendre with the extend usage of hack (n) being "a tip or trick for an efficient method of doing something"

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1 hour ago, eric9000k said:

I'll just get the case aftermarket along with a sapphire crystal and build a custom skx, this seems to be a very cool and popular thing to do!  What I can't figure out is if the 6R15 is the best choice for this and what dial options I"ll be able to use.

A 6R15 will set you back $130 if branded as SII NE15, and even more if Seiko, now since a SII NH36 does practically the same for $100 less then is clear why the latter is the popular choice. Have a read of the many modders topic on WUS. There must be thousands of posting and pictures on the subject, and complete watches and parts are often listed.

Edited by jdm

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Are you aware of any other significant differences besides the mainspring that come to mind just curious.

The project, it's not something I'm actively pursuing right now just in the research phase.  I probably won't try to build the skx until I can disassemble and rebuild even if it is way simpler.

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14 hours ago, eric9000k said:

Are you aware of any other significant differences besides the mainspring that come to mind just curious.

The 6R15 hairspring has a better material and the top plates are finished as Côte de Geneve, which makes it stand out better on a clear caseback as opposed to a diver's. 

Once again I recommed that you get to learn on something else, not a perfectly fine new watch. Ideal are cheap mechanical watches individual or in lots which can be bought for around $30. 

We see often that beginners think to know better of the advice given and/or largely underestimate the extent of effort and time which goes into learning how to take apart a mechanical or even quartz movement and put it back working the same or better than it was before. To me is no surprise that after few initial long worded postings declaring ambitious objectives they are not ever heard again.

I hope that won't be your case and further to that I highly recommend that you invest in your education enrolling in the comprehensive training offered by our Host Mark Lovick at www.watchrepairlessons.com 

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On 5/29/2020 at 7:20 AM, jdm said:

Once again I recommed that you get to learn on something else, not a perfectly fine new watch. Ideal are cheap mechanical watches individual or in lots which can be bought for around $30. 

We see often that beginners think to know better of the advice given and/or largely underestimate the extent of effort and time which goes into learning how to take apart a mechanical or even quartz movement and put it back working the same or better than it was before. To me is no surprise that after few initial long worded postings declaring ambitious objectives they are not ever heard again.

I hope that won't be your case and further to that I highly recommend that you invest in your education enrolling in the comprehensive training offered by our Host Mark Lovick at www.watchrepairlessons.com 

Nonsense!  None of that has anything to do with me personally, if you think it does you have simply ignored half of what I have already said.  I'm very well aware that every hobby that has ever been invented in the history of mankind (and with a web forum dedicated to its providence) has the same type of gate-keeping.

:D have a good day!

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On 5/29/2020 at 7:20 AM, jdm said:

The 6R15 hairspring has a better material and the top plates are finished as Côte de Geneve, which makes it stand out better on a clear caseback as opposed to a diver's. 

Well, ok I have to also say yes thanks for answering that other question.  It makes sense.  This movement belongs in a different style of watch and is not appropriate for a diver when a less expensive and equally suitable alternative is more readily available.  Especially considering the whole point is to have an upgraded movement without overspending.  That makes perfect sense.

About the other post I'm just saying you can spare me this lecture about how you feel new people don't listen and think they know better especially if your inclination is to be repetitive.

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27 minutes ago, eric9000k said:

About the other post I'm just saying you can spare me this lecture about how you feel new people don't listen and think they know better especially if your inclination is to be repetitive.

It's good to meet a polemicist every once in a while. If you don't want to accept that is you, you're welcome to think that it's me :biggrin:. I'll be curious to read you contributions here in six months and then in one year, good luck.

Edited by jdm

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Sure, thanks.  I'll remember you're the guy to come crying to when I can't figure out which way is up?  :D  I'm going to the beach with my kids and I'm pretty excited about wearing this Mako II Pepsi.  :camp:

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I've put a 6r15/Ne15 in my SKX. Just because I could. Swapped the stem and crown to have access to the hacking and handwinding capabilities of the movement. There's a few other little parts you need to take off a 7s26 to convert a 6r15/ne15 to run a day wheel.  It's a little easier to regulate to a more stable positional variance and has a longer power reserve. But I still don't know how to fully strip down, clean, oil and reassemble. I know my limitations and It's something I'd love to find the time to do but I know I can't commit the hours at present.

I think crystaltimes has a display caseback if you want to see the machined rotor striping. Also, most Seiko dials and aftermarket modding dials are the same size, some are for crown at 3 and some are for crown at 4 but snipping the dial feet and using dial dots can mean you can use most dials at 28.5mm. If that helps. Good luck with your new venture and yes, Mark Lovick has a great series of 4 videos (freely available on youtube) where he strips down and rebuilds a 7s26a movement. These movements have very similar architecture, with the 6r15/nh36 etc having been built off the back of the 7s26 and having some swappable parts. 

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