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SeanA

Looking for a Larger Automatic Movement...

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I've been looking for a solid, decently priced (<$200) automatic movement that is able to use a 38mm or larger dial but I'm having problems finding anything. I found ETA 6497/6498s but I don't like how the seconds hand is separated. From what I understand, ETA 2824s use dials around 30mm (unless I'm understanding incorrectly, and a larger dial can be used for these movements). Can anyone help with this? I'm trying to build my own watch. 

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First, have you got already a case and dial?

There is  no strict relation between the sizes of mov't and dial, but in practice the latter, together with the case, must have been designed for the mov't, unless you are able to make significant fabrication. 

The video below may help you. 

BTW we have a dedicated section where is considered polite for new members to introduce themselves. 

 

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In-line with @jdm's statement, This has been the very thing that has been the business model of Invicta. They place average sized yet reliable movements in enormous cases with dials that fit and look proper from the front until you see them from behind. What you see below are two Invicta watch cases and movements. The lager is a very large chronograph with a Swiss Ronda quartz movement. The smaller is an Invicta diver with a NH35A movement with Seiko heritage. The actual movements are barely a millimeter in size difference. In the final picture below, you can see the large plastic spacer ring Invicta employs to keep the movement in place and stable.  So, the ultimate answer for the OP is yes, you can make anything fit in a large enough case, including a massively over-sized one with enough engineering.

20200208_115532.thumb.jpg.030650b0eb9f9925ac61166935c73134.jpg

20200208_113058.thumb.jpg.eead7ecb8ecd7a4dd0aa39dba906cf8a.jpg20200208_113258.thumb.jpg.b3781cdb655bf198ceaf97d30b1e4abb.jpg20200208_113228.thumb.jpg.0046b7a9f7cf3c4b4058d7a25a53f131.jpg20200208_113330.thumb.jpg.befefff6b5d68100d1923538a7e7edc8.jpg

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One more almost obvious note. Everything is much easier if making for a time only piece. No date window to align, or sit too central. All the rest can be arranged, but it depends what level of sophistication one is aiming for.

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See dimensions F ,H, T for movements in Dr ranfft site.

You want the stem to align with stem tube of the case. 

You may also want dial feet to fit the movement, and day date if any.

The rest can pretty well be made fit.

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