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Elma Master Watch Cleaning Machine Wiring Diagram/user Manual?

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Oh I forgot the base, this was a PITA do clean up, those jar holder tabs cut my fingers up, but the finished product was worth it.  I removed the cork strips that were on there, and have some new cork 5mm sheets to cut some correct sized strips to replace them :)

 

15665678406_5c81022022.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

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Just noticed, that those jar holders can be removed quite easily from the bottom by tapping out the two retaining pegs each spring has.  Wish I found this out BEFORE I shredded my fingers lol

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Its getting exciting now Geo, I have finally decided to etch, and coat the casing parts with a few layers of clear lacquer, after all the hard work of removing all the paint, and all the wire wool, and sanding work, it would be a shame to hide it all under a colour paint :)

 

I have taken photographs of the wiring, so I know how to rewire it, I did initially plan on replacing the large speed controller, but I think I will reuse it as its still working, so too is the motor, and the heater, the latter looks newer than the other components, so I would imagine the heater has been renewed at some point.

Edited by SSTEEL

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New wiring purchased, so getting down to the rewiring soon. Waiting for some parts from cousins too, a new heater switch, bulb, and motor base cork ring gasket, the latter is out of stock until the 14th of this month.

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Me too, the end is in sight :)

 

Most of the screws and bolts etc need to be replaced, with the exception of the specialist screws/bolts, hopefully I can find these at my local hardware store. As you can see, many of rusted up, or chewed up.

 

15722540265_8326cc2345.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

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First up in the spray booth is the motor shroud :) This is after one coat, I have since sprayed a second coat, and depending on how it looks, may go for a third coat.

 

15607352807_d41506f1c2.jpg

 

Then the Heater Shroud :)

 

15794181302_9de3f2a039.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

Edited by SSTEEL

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I am so impressed - it's going to be like a new machine.

 

Now I wonder - would it be beneficial to coat the inside of the drying chamber with that heat resistant car paint, the one you would use on an engine for example. Probably overkill?

 

Maybe even under the heating element too - to prevent corrosion?

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Starting to think maybe I should of started a separate thread for my Elma Super Elite restoration.

 

Anyway, new varnish in, and final parts now after two coats, a final coat on everything, then will polish the parts to remove any overspray.

 

15607567849_a9bc0cc8c3.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

 

15607989078_c8c34f4425.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

 

15793391765_635f4b2fc8.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

 

15173955973_a11edd0493.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

 

15607570279_414f3e1580.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

 

15173440034_59b106f91c.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

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And a few shots now the clear varnish has dried :)

 

 

 

 

15609339097_738cf6d1bc.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

 

 

 

15770825626_e2e2b0ca0a.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

 

15609661890_93c07e0047.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

 

15608676819_7899de3bb1.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

 

The cast alloy parts, although come out ok, they are not as glossy and smooth as the aluminium case parts, so will need a few more coats tomorrow.

 

15794505745_67e232b52f.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

 

15770829526_5d8ee02e71.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

 

15609098308_d64dfabaef.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

 

15175067273_d26cf5763d.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

 

And the base needs one more coat...

 

15794508715_542d01acde.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

 

15609347137_884263aecf.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

 

15794510935_b5178bbf1d.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

Edited by SSTEEL

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Lovely gloss finish you have there Micky, when does assembly start?

 

Thanks, all being well rewiring will start next week, quite busy with work during the week, so only have time at the weekends.

 

I love how it is coming out! Great job!

 

Thank you :)

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Thanks, the wiring looks like a nightmare, but luckily I was wise enough to take photos of the various wiring, and connections which should help the rewiring :)

 

Anyhow, some goodies in from Cousinsuk..

 

Complete basket, this is the alternative to the obsolete Elma item..

 

15812312405_15a73d4717.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

 

15627463660_2f33fce27c.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

 

Gasket for the Motor (Seals baskets in the jars, preventing spash-back.

 

15626912998_a1dbe93865.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

 

Heater switch..

 

15810428181_0655d289c5.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

 

And new bulb.  I was contemplating fitting a modern motor speed adjuster, and LED light but seeing as the old parts are still working, I serviced them, and they should be fine for some yers to come all being well..

 

15812315875_0c49552757.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

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OK - I'm jealous, I want a blue basket!!! Mine is boring grey.

 

:D

 

Top tip: If you ever need more of the little baskets (you can never have enough IMO) then I usually buy them from this guy - quarter of the price of Cousins:

http://www.ebay.de/itm/Siebkapsel-z-B-fur-Elma-Reinigungsmaschinen-/141412294943?pt=Uhrmacherwerkzeug&hash=item20ecd4611f

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Wow! Nice and professional! Micky that's one mean machine you are putting together! I bet it will be better than new! Keep it up, great job! If I were a watch I'll be anxious to get a bath in that machine!

 

@Mark: Hi Mark, nice link, how do they compare in size to the Bergeon ones? I'd like to buy a couple myself!

Edited by bobm12

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Wow! Nice and professional! Micky that's one mean machine you are putting together! I bet it will be better than new! Keep it up, great job! If I were a watch I'll be anxious to get a bath in that machine!

 

@Mark: Hi Mark, nice link, how do they compare in size to the Bergeon ones? I'd like to buy a couple myself!

 

Sorry Bob, but I never purchased the Bergeon ones so I can't compare.

 

 

Nice link Mark wondering if they fit the L&R

 

Yes - I think they do fit the six compartment tray.

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