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Folkvisor

Clock Oiling

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16 minutes ago, Folkvisor said:

Wow, this is good news! I could by 2 or 3 quarts of motor oil for what it cost me for a very small bottle of clock oil!

Also, I was told to use transmission fluid to lube springs. Cheap and seems to be working so far for the few clocks I've fixed.

:pulling-hair-out:

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On 9/16/2017 at 9:02 AM, oldhippy said:

:pulling-hair-out:

 

you could save even more money with used motor oil  :startle:

 

Before moving away from the intended horology oils, I'd think one would want to really understand the different additives.  While its true sulfur in EP style oils, gear oil for example, is especially bad for yellow metals (brass, bronze), picking a low sulfur motor oil doesn't exactly put you in the clear.  I believe all motor oils,synthetic or otherwise have either ZDDP or ZDTP.  Even hydraulic fluid, which is a quite pure, mostly additive free mineral oil has ZDDP.   I believe ZDDP/ZDTP is not good for yellow metals.   There are also long lists of other additives which may or may not have an effect.

I also wonder at using multi grade oils?  The temperature in a clock is only ever going to be at the first viscosity listed.

If you wanted to use industrial oils, you could search and read some of discussions on what to use with worm wheels, which are very often made of bronze.  Any oil a credible source recommends for use with a bronze worm wheel should work for a clock, assuming you can match viscosity.

End of the day though, why not just use the correct oil?  Its a complicated subject and short of getting a degree in hydrocarbon chemistry, fraught with downside for a little bit of upside.  If anything, it should be us amateurs, who'll use so little of the stuff, that don't mind the price difference.

 

 

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On 10/17/2017 at 9:33 PM, vinn3 said:

at last; !,  multi. visc. engine oil is reconized ! i don't use Tranny oil because,  it is hydrolic oil, not engine oil. vin

i would not recommend either oil, but if you did want to go that route hydraulic oil would be a much better choice than motor oil, although like motor oil it still has zinc phosphates.  Hydraulic oil is basically a quality mineral oil with a lot let less additives than motor oil (stuff like detergents, anti-foaming agents etc we don't need or want). 

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43 minutes ago, vinn3 said:

not mineral oil  or whale oil,   synthetic oil,  multi additives  and multi viscosity.  that is the point. though,  i would like to get some whale oil.  vin

Why would you want the additives, and multi viscosity?  A lot of the additives may be harmful to yellow metals, and most like detergents (keep particles in suspension) and anti foaming do no good and possibly harm.   These oils are designed for IC engines and the problems with burning and carbon etc.   I don't know of any advantage for synthetic motor oil at room temps....mostly its advantages are a high temperatures.  For applications not subject to burning fossil fuels, hydraulic oil may be a better choice, There's less additives (although still has the zinc compounds that may not be good for yellow metals)

As for multi viscosity,  you know the second viscosity is at 100C?   For example if you bought a 10w-30 or 10W (about ISO 32 iirc) they would basically have the same viscosity at room temps.  Multi-grade are intended to perform over season changes and also from cold start to  operating temps, I'm not sure what reason there'd be to use multigrade if the temperature is constant.

Do you think there is something wrong with what is sold as clock oils?   I don't have much clock oil expertise, but knowledge of oil in other applications where yellow metals are involved suggests its not a good idea

Edited by measuretwice

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nothing wrong with clock oils.   as far as new engine oils,  there are no corosives for brass or bronze.  the old "non deturgent" "mineral oils"  were replaced by synthetic motor oil.   a great improvement !  i was working for standard oil when the "multi - viscosity" oil came out.  many tests were were  made.  don't use it on watches.  vin

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Engine oil has detergent in it. It keeps the crap suspended and the filter takes most of that out.

In a clock/watch you need a pure oil that allows the crap to disperse away from the rotating parts.

You want clean oil to separate the moving parts. It's the fine film held in with capillary action that prevents the metal to metal/jewel contact.

This helps stop the grinding paste destroying the bearings.

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6 hours ago, watson1 said:

Engine oil has detergent in it. It keeps the crap suspended and the filter takes most of that out.

In a clock/watch you need a pure oil that allows the crap to disperse away from the rotating parts.

You want clean oil to separate the moving parts. It's the fine film held in with capillary action that prevents the metal to metal/jewel contact.

This helps stop the grinding paste destroying the bearings.

welcome to the forum;  metal/jewel contact?   vin

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