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I'm trying to fix a 1970's Bulova bracelet that has very loose links. It's not just the links that are loose, the pins at the lugs as well as on the clasp do not look to be correct. Sorry for the wrist cheese in these photos.

1. First, what would be the name of this type of pin that is found on the links? I'm used to seeing cotter pins that have a split just at the tip, not ones that are split the entire length, so I'm not sure what kind of pins I need to order. Are there kits with assorted sizes available?

1.jpg.09979568450bf59693032dcc552f1a28.jpg



2. The pins at the lugs just fall right out and they look to be of different types so I don't think these are correct. I think these may just take normal cotter pins but I haven't done a lot of this type of central lug style of bracelets. Are there kits with assorted sizes available?

2.thumb.jpg.402cccbc5b09e570f934ac787a335fa9.jpg



3. The spring type found in the clasp doesn't look correct either as the pins extend out on both sides way too much. Is there a kit with an assortment for the type needed here?

 

3.thumb.jpg.a406cbf256114438ef234cc49061c6c4.jpg

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20 minutes ago, HectorLooi said:

If you do a search for "bracelet pin" in Cousins website, you'll find all the various designs available.

I actually came from there before posting here. I'm not clear on what type of pins are needed to replace the ones shown as I think the ones on both the bracelet clasp and lugs are not correct, so was wondering if anyone had suggestions on the correct ones.

For the link pins, I looked on both Cousin's and Esslinger and can't find a split pin that runs the entire length of the pin, they all are the typical cotter pins. Is there a name for those types of pins? Or maybe the ones that I show are the typical cotter pins that have just been stretched/expanded along the entire length?

Edited by GuyMontag
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The split does run the entire length of the pins. They are different from cotter pins in that the ends are the ones with the "bulge", and not a loop folded over.

I use split pins most of the time. Sometimes I just use ortho wire, 1.2mm or 1.5mm and hammer a flat portion and cut it to length. A drop of Loctite for added security.

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  • 2 weeks later...

there are so many stiles of pins, screws, rivet, pressure and spring bars for watches, the one in the buckle is a springbar for sure, buckle springbars have a shorter end so as not to protrude out from the buckle itself and fit flush, but the the fold over part of yours looks to have been cut with only a smaller center piece holding the springbar or it has been flipped around and goes between the other part of the fold-over, if Cousins does not show assortments of the parts mentioned then look on eBay or other material houses, like Jules Borel, Cas-Ker, Esslinger etc. for ideas, the fold over pins are probably correct for the band links, the band to case could be different like the center tube notch and pin type...

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 2/3/2024 at 6:30 AM, GuyMontag said:

I'm trying to fix a 1970's Bulova bracelet that has very loose links. It's not just the links that are loose, the pins at the lugs as well as on the clasp do not look to be correct. Sorry for the wrist cheese in these photos.

1. First, what would be the name of this type of pin that is found on the links? I'm used to seeing cotter pins that have a split just at the tip, not ones that are split the entire length, so I'm not sure what kind of pins I need to order. Are there kits with assorted sizes available?

1.jpg.09979568450bf59693032dcc552f1a28.jpg



2. The pins at the lugs just fall right out and they look to be of different types so I don't think these are correct. I think these may just take normal cotter pins but I haven't done a lot of this type of central lug style of bracelets. Are there kits with assorted sizes available?

2.thumb.jpg.402cccbc5b09e570f934ac787a335fa9.jpg



3. The spring type found in the clasp doesn't look correct either as the pins extend out on both sides way too much. Is there a kit with an assortment for the type needed here Visit https://braceletwithpictureinside.store?

 

3.thumb.jpg.a406cbf256114438ef234cc49061c6c4.jpg

Hi. I have seen 16618 (both black and blue dial ones) with bezels that have yellow, gold and white fonts. My question is which type of bezel is the more correct one? Or were they just mounted on 16618 randomly through different periods? My second question is about the bracelet. When did Rolex stop using pin bracelet and switched to screws? (pin on removable links vs screws) Thanks!

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