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Can this dial be helped?


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Hi, unless you have a contact for a really, really talented restorer, that dial is beyond saving. 

If you happen to know the case reference and/or movement, we might be able to help track down a replacement dial that will fit that squircle case. There may be something on the back, but often Tissot put their reference details inside the caseback on those vintage timepieces.

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On 9/25/2023 at 4:13 PM, irina said:

Could you please give an advice on this watch. Dial almost completely destroyed. What to do? Any chance to repair it? Thank you in advance!

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Hi irina,  not to repair it yourself, if you had that skill you would already know that answer. A professional restoration very likely more than the watch's value. I see your other options as finding another identical dial that fits to replace this one, striping and customising the dial you have as a fun project. What does this watch mean to you ?

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I have to agree with all of the comments above, as soon as you open up the watch all those loose flakes of paint will start to peel off and if you go near it to remove the hands etc you will cause more to become dislodged and you will end up with less dial detail than you do now. From my understanding dial restoration is extremely expensive and many times the cost of anything other than a very premium brand of watch. If you can find one then a replacement dial is the way to go as other have mentioned. My advice would be to look on ebay for a similar watch, looking for just a dial can be an expensive and time consuming way to do it, often a movement including a dial or more often complete watch with a good dial can be purchased for less than the cost of a solo dial (strange but true) and you will also have spare parts available in case something you haven't discovered yet on the inside needs replacing. As and example, I have an Enicar with a damaged dial, and a (new after market) replacement dial is over $50, but I just ordered a complete movement (including original dial and hands) for $30.

Non-round dials are more tricky to find, and just as a 'heads-up' you may want to think about the crystal also, as finding a replacement non-round crystal for it may prove as challenging as finding the new dial.

Sorry it's not good news, but hopefully you have enough information now to move in the right direction - best of luck and let us know how it turns out 🙂

 

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  • 3 months later...

A restoration is the only answer. With it in that condition no matter what you do to the movement such as a clean, parts of the dial will find its way in and interfere with the works. The shape of the case doesn't help as it isn't round, shaped cases are more prone to dirt and dust and God knows what.  

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