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I am continuing with my restoration of early IWC Cal. 64 and Cal 64T watch movements. Even after cleaning and oiling the timing is often out by more than the index lever can accomodate. Today the movement was running slow, however, the timing screws on the balance were each 3 turns unscrewed. This provided me with the necessary adjustment to increase the beat rate. But it can be a fiddly job, particularly for my unsteady hands. Here is my solution - a small clamp to hold the balance while I turn the screws with a 0.5 mm Horotec driver

:post-374-0-17502200-1419005261_thumb.jpg

The base is milled out of Delrin (Nylon), the finger clamp is from copper-beryllium shim with a thin leather lining on the balance side. The screw-down piece is made from a from a pocket watch stem and crown.

Here it is under the x20 binocular microscope with perfect vision and access to the timing screws.

post-374-0-78764000-1419005735_thumb.jpg

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I just love innovation, a great solution and well illustrated. I'll file that one in the memory banks, or maybe I should write it down!

Just had a thought, should you not have removed the spring from the balance to check poise after altering the screws?

Edited by Geo
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Great job - I love custom tools :)

 

 

I just love innovation, a great solution and well illustrated. I'll file that one in the memory banks, or maybe I should write it down!

Just had a thought, should you not have removed the spring from the balance to check poise after altering the screws?

 

Better to dynamically poise using a timing machine IMO Geo - much more accurate as the balance spring will affect the poise again when you put it back on.

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Better to dynamically poise using a timing machine IMO Geo - much more accurate as the balance spring will affect the poise again when you put it back on.

Thanks for the heads up with that one. It would be a good subject for a video.

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Thanks for the heads up with that one. It would be a good subject for a video.

 

Yep - better results with dynamic poising.

I never use my poising tool any more - just the timing machine.

I will show you guys my method one of these days.

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Yep - better results with dynamic poising.

I never use my poising tool any more - just the timing machine.

I will show you guys my method one of these days.

 

You did it at the end of the video

Fitting a new balance staff to a vintage 1940s cyma www military watch

But the method was shrouded in mystery. I am waiting keenly for the day!

Edited by cdjswiss
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Coming back to the adjustmnet of balance wheel timing screws. I use a screwdriver rather than a balance screw pin vice. The latter gives less feel and can, in my case, easily lead to a broken off screw head. Extracting the threaded portion from the balance wheel afterwards is tricky to say the least. Of course the pin vice is perfect for the initial fit of a new screw into a vacant hole, but then I stop and continue with the screwdriver.

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Excellent work cdjswiss, us young pups learn so much here.

 

I do however have one criticism, when making specialized tools like that, you should never just make one, what ever were you thinking?!? 

 

... I mean, how am I suppose to buy one off you now? ^_^

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Wow, that's given me a lot of food for thought.................and a lot more to digest. Many thanks for taking the time on a Friday night before Christmas to post this.

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Excellent work cdjswiss, us young pups learn so much here.

 

I do however have one criticism, when making specialized tools like that, you should never just make one, what ever were you thinking?!? 

 

... I mean, how am I suppose to buy one off you now? ^_^

Thanks for the praise and offer. If I was a young man .... but for me time is running out and so many other watch movements to tackle!.

Edited by cdjswiss
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