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wolfinjo

Casio is not working after new battery

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Hi,

So I have Casio watch as show on pictures below:

0-02-04-27d769f6fa423f3524ad71348855992c 0-02-04-88be9c161068a8f8444ff7eaac1e7540 0-02-04-339d6fa89d9100ca55d142a965ef9a58

several months did not work because the battery was empty, but when I bought a new battery. the watch unfortunately still does not work.

since it has sentimental value I would love to repair it if is possible. so I hope you can help me and give you some advice.

I heard that all Casio watches needs to reset it when setting up a new battery? But i dont know how ?

Thank you

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On the back of your watch, Casio usually marks the movement caliber inside a box. Go to Casio's website and enter those characters into their search engine and retrieve your user manual. Instructions will be included about how to reset after a battery change if required. If not, you have other issues.

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After my original post, I enlarged your photo and identified your movement as an Epson VX3j. The repair manual doesn't note a reset as being required after a battery replacement. Occasionally when a watch has lain dormant for a bit, the oil sets and the works won't turn. Try gently warming the movement for a few moments with a hair dryer set on low. Watchmakers have a tool that will pulse the stepping motor freeing it up. You might take it to a local watchmaker and ask if they can perform that service for you. 

If the movement has perished, all is not lost. The movements are both plentiful and inexpensive. With some modest tools and some patience, you can change the movement yourself. Plenty of videos are posted on YouTube showing how to do it. Try bringing this one back to life first though.

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1 hour ago, TexasDon said:

On the back of your watch, Casio usually marks the movement caliber inside a box. Go to Casio's website and enter those characters into their search engine and retrieve your user manual. Instructions will be included about how to reset after a battery change if required. If not, you have other issues.

 

 

49 minutes ago, TexasDon said:

After my original post, I enlarged your photo and identified your movement as an Epson VX3j. The repair manual doesn't note a reset as being required after a battery replacement. Occasionally when a watch has lain dormant for a bit, the oil sets and the works won't turn. Try gently warming the movement for a few moments with a hair dryer set on low. Watchmakers have a tool that will pulse the stepping motor freeing it up. You might take it to a local watchmaker and ask if they can perform that service for you. 

If the movement has perished, all is not lost. The movements are both plentiful and inexpensive. With some modest tools and some patience, you can change the movement yourself. Plenty of videos are posted on YouTube showing how to do it. Try bringing this one back to life first though.

Ok. Thank you I will try that :)

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You can kill it or cure it with electrical spray contact cleaner.spray it into the gears flush out the gunk.let it dry completely.slightest bit of oil on the shaft holes.make sure the cleaner is plastic safe.forget taking the movement apart.

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11 hours ago, yankeedog said:

You can kill it or cure it with electrical spray contact cleaner.spray it into the gears flush out the gunk.let it dry completely.slightest bit of oil on the shaft holes.make sure the cleaner is plastic safe.forget taking the movement apart.

I will try that also, but at this moment i dont have electrical spray contact cleaner... I dont is this WD40 spay or ?

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oh no ! wd40 is great stuff , but not to spray in your watch ! I have been told that it is fish oil... and I believe it. Never in my life have I seen a rusty fish !Electrical contact cleaner can be found at your local auto parts store .It works well for dissolving old oil and washing out crud and it dries without residue.it's main purpose of course is that it cleans electrical contacts..and in a quartz watch which only works on 1.5 volts the slightest bit of corrosion in the wrong place can screw you up.take out the battery and  just kind of hold the watch at an angle and spray into the works and let it drip out.you might have to do it a couple of times, you dont want soak the watch so much so it gets all over the hands and dial. Quick spray, allow to dry and repeat you can oil it with just the smallest drop of light motor oil.I have done this to a couple of quartz watches. It seems to work ok.just be sure the can says it is plastic safe If not you could end up  melting the plastic parts.Look for the CRC  brand. it's good stuff

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On 2/9/2019 at 10:21 AM, TexasDon said:

Occasionally when a watch has lain dormant for a bit, the oil sets and the works won't turn. Try gently warming the movement for a few moments with a hair dryer set on low. Watchmakers have a tool that will pulse the stepping motor freeing it up. You might take it to a local watchmaker and ask if they can perform that service for you. 

That is a great tip !

I am sure I have an opportunity to try that one day    

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