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Elma Master Watch Cleaning Machine Wiring Diagram/user Manual?

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I know Mark has one of these machines, I recently purchased one myself, and its in dire need of restoring.  I have stripped it down, and wish to rewire it and replace the ageing motor speed switch with a modern alternative, so could really do with a wiring diagram if anyone has one?

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Hi Micky,

 

Have you found anywhere that would sell a new rheostat for the elma? Mine has little to no adjustment on the motor speed anymore. I have managed to set it at a manageable speed but it would be nice to ramp it up during the spin-off.

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Yes Mark, found a small alternative to the variable motor speed switch...

 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/New-AC-50-220V-2000W-Motor-Speed-Control-SCR-Controller-Knob-Switch-/251665634527?&_trksid=p2056016.l4276

 

Also found complete new machines, one without timer, and another twitch timer for £299 and £399 each, but wheres the fun in that?  

 

Prefer to restore my own.  

 

For anyone interested in the new pieces, see below..

 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Watch-cleaning-machine-janta-pearl-brand-cleans-rolex-omega-tissot-2045-/111473300849?pt=UK_Jewellery_Watches_WatchAccessories_SpareParts_SM&hash=item19f4539571

 

With timer..

 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Watch-cleaning-machine-janta-pearl-brand-with-timer-cleans-all-watches-2047-/291253631038?pt=UK_Jewellery_Watches_WatchAccessories_SpareParts_SM&hash=item43d011b83e

 

Janter Branded.

Edited by SSTEEL

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I also have one of these elma cleaners, it seems that there is now a buzzing sounds and the switch doesnt really work, after long use there is a slight smell of burning. Im assuming i need to clean up the bearings in the motor and replace the switch.

 

I could probably figure out the switch,but wouldn't know how to clean up the motor bearings.

 

Any help would be appreciated.

 

Thanks

 

J

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I wouldn't be over concerned about the bearings unless they are making a noise. The switch on the other hand will probably be what is making the buzzing sound. If you can't get the switch apart to clean the contacts, I recommend you get a new one sooner than later. In all honesty, you should replace the switch anyway.

Once you have replaced/repaired the switch, run the machine dry and hold the blade of a long screwdriver to the top and then bottom of the motor as close to the bearings as possible, and put your ear against the handle. You will be able to hear how good the bearings are. There should just be a gentle hiss, if they are screaming or rumbling, replace them.

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Well my Elma Super Elite is coming together slowly, I have removed all the old paint from the circular base, heater chamber, and motor cover so far with the timer housing and front fascia, and central pole clamp currently soaking in acetone ready for the refinishing.

 

 

Base..

 

15648207765_907ecf80c9.jpgUntitled by Micky.!, on Flickr

 

Heater chamber, and motor shroud..

 

15678012071_882950fef3.jpgELMA SUPER ELITE REFURB by Micky.!, on Flickr

 

I have purchased what I think is the correct hammered blue paint, but I am actually now considering not painting it a colour at all, I might just clear coat it to give it that rustic look, undecided at the moment, so any opinions would be greatly appreciated.

Edited by SSTEEL

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That's one hell of a thorough job your doing Micky, I'm looking forward to seeing the end result. Regarding finish, I think I would go with the blue hammered finish, I think it might be more durable and resistant to cleaning fluids.

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Thats very useful info - thanks for sharing.

 

I am sure Graham Baxter uses powder coating when he referbs the L&R machines - is that an option for you? 

I have never done powder coating so I don't know what is involved but I understand it is very durable.

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Ideally Mark, I would love to have it powder coated, but alas I know of nowhere local that offers this, so what I done is found a very close match blue, with hammered effect, its brush on Hammerite.  I just hope I manage to achieve a nice even coating with it.

Edited by SSTEEL

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That was my original plan, and was going to spray it with clear coat to give it some durability.  I have since etched the surfaces now ready to paint blue, but I do like the idea of a satin finish which I can do with my wire wool.

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Powder coating would be ideal, I agree, but I can't find anywhere local that can do it, but I would be prepared to ship the parts to the UK if needed to be coated. Anyone know if Graham Baxter would be willing to powder coat my parts?

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