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Seiko 5216 differential wheel


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4 hours ago, JohnR725 said:

Then I vaguely recall some time in the past mixing some of this up don't remember having a problem and I definitely did not use isopropyl alcohol.

Yes, benzine, I tried that too, mixing 9010 with benzine exactly like the Omega guide said. For testing I used it on ETA 2824's double reverser wheels and an vintage Seiko's differential wheel. The movements are known to be working fine before testing cause I serviced them myself and the automatic winding all worked flameless as they was treated with V105 in the service. Now, reverser wheels and differential would get removed, cleaned then treated with 9010/benzine mixture.

- On the 2824 I notice the rotor does not move freely in both directions as it should, and the rotor does actually spins when handwinding slowly with the movement lying down flat.

- On the Seiko it was so worse that handwing becomes extremely stiff, very bad helicopter effect on the rotor, and very bad automatic winding performance.

It was so bad with the Seiko I thought I somehow broke the wheel but after clean and treated with V105 everything returns to normal. Flaweless working automatic winding system and silky smooth handwinding.

This was written in AWCI article August 2012 about V105:

lubeta1.PNG.f0f0a309a304172a344c9e5bd8ce9a0b.PNG

 

lubeta2.PNG.c7fc85d5520252c3c69ce9222a4de71a.PNG

As the article described Lubeta V105 is a dry lubricant, and notice the waxy film it leaves behind on the reverser wheel. This thing and the 9010/benzine mixture are TOTALLY different. This is what I really want to point out. V105 leaves a dry coated layer on the wheel, while in my experiment, I can't get the wheels to dry at all, eventhough it's just 3% of 9010 it is, still, conventional oil, that's why it leaves an oily liquid on the wheel which I can't get it to dry no matter how long I waited or how hard I try to blow it with an air blower.

Now I'm not sponsored by ETA by anymean and you guys are clearly not buying V105 from me. In fact, all my efforts are to look for an alternative that can replace the unique V105. I just don't want people to assume that, because the 9010 mixture didn't work, means V105 won't work either. They are assuming V105 and the 9010 mixture are the same while they are not. Just think about it, if you could achieve the same good result with 9010, why bother developed something different?

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Never tried it on a Seiko movement but I have successfully used the diluted 9010 on Swiss movements many times over the years. I have only recently encountered issues with a 7.75''' ETA 2651 which wasn't happy so I bought some V105 and solved the problem.

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Okay

5 hours ago, ColdWind said:

vintage Seiko's differential wheel

What was Seiko's recommendation for their wheel? This is because each of the various automatic watches have different recommendations.

5 hours ago, ColdWind said:

This is what I really want to point out. V105 leaves a dry coated layer on the wheel, while in my experiment, I can't get the wheels to dry at all, eventhough it's just 3% of 9010 it is, still, conventional oil, that's why it leaves an oily liquid on the wheel which I can't get it to dry no matter how long I waited or how hard I try to blow it with an air blower.

Well I would agree with that it's oil mixed in a solvent. I suppose if you put a microscopic quantity of oil you can get it to look dry but you're still going to have a thin film of oil. My interpretation of what they were trying to do was to apply a very thin coating of oil but not so much as to being sticky exactly what you're finding. 

5 hours ago, ColdWind said:

Now I'm not sponsored by ETA by anymean and you guys are clearly not buying V105 from me. In fact, all my efforts are to look for an alternative that can replace the unique V105. I just don't want people to assume that, because the 9010 mixture didn't work, means V105 won't work either. They are assuming V105 and the 9010 mixture are the same while they are not. Just think about it, if you could achieve the same good result with 9010, why bother developed something different?

You do realize who originally came up with the formula for the alternative don't you? It may have been in the Omega document but somewhere around here I have a paper copy of something from ETA who originally came up with the V105 formula and they were only recommending it as an alternative if You could not purchase the v105.

So what we have interesting here is based on your samples we have a 100% failure rate. I have a suspicion that if the entire world was having a 100% failure rate of this we would've heard about it by now.

Then I'm not sure in the group that anyone would embrace if the alternative fails the preferred would also fail. On the other hand this is a group of people would like to use lighter fluid and sometimes DIY mixing their own watch cleaning products rather than purchasing a cleaning products so knows maybe they would feel that way.

https://www.moebius-lubricants.ch/en/products/specialities

 

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