Jump to content
GregC

Scrollsaw Cuckoo Clock

Recommended Posts

6 hours ago, JimmyD said:

It depends on the type of movement you are putting in the clock, battery or brass?

The first will be battery as 10 yrs ago when I was all gung ho for scrolling I bought everything for 3 clocks. Now that I'm closer to completion I'm thinking I could make the cavity deeper to fit a real cuckoo mvmt. I just need to know if they are a standard height 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regula make a 1 day and 8 day movement, these can be bought at time savers. A few things you need to know, the depth, the movement will need to be screwed to the inside of the face board, so about 6 mm think blocks need to be glued on to take the screws, then add the distance from the mounting bracket to the tip of the crutch, then add another 50mm so you have enough room for the cuckoo belows. The hight is dictated by where  the hands arbour hole is placed on the face. The width you have already since you have made the frets. Have a look on eBay at cuckoo clocks for sale to see how they are normally set up on the inside to give you an idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, JimmyD said:

It depends on the type of movement you are putting in the clock, battery or brass?

First one is going to be quartz. I just measured the darn thing and forgot the dimensions. I think its 4" wide by 6" high. Original plan has it 2" deep but I can alter it to make it deeper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did most of the staining. Its still wet so I'll have to wait till tomorrow to put the lacquer on but this is what they look like.Not sure if I like how it will look but I have spares in case.

 

IMG_20190606_205118.jpg

IMG_20190606_205411.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I stained and varnished enough parts to make a complete clock but I cant make up my mind which looks better. Should I make it dark overlays or medium? 

 

 

IMG_20190608_104606.jpg

IMG_20190608_104713.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, JimmyD said:

I think the 1st photo looks better with more of a contras, just remember to put the dial with the 12 at the top.

I thought so too but I just realized how the color is like that. I didnt read the directions for the stain and didnt wipe the excess off thats why its so dark. I hope these old messed up brains can remember to put XII at the top, lol  ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I certainly did not want to replace the motor, as this is so very visible, all attempts at maintaining the illusion of originality would fail. A solution to the problem could only be achieved with a safer, replacement speed control, which could work with the original mains voltage motor. Fortunately, these are readily available in the form of a Pulse Width Modulated (PWM), motor speed controller circuit. These will take in the 220V incoming mains supply and provide a variable output of between 50V and the incoming supply voltage. These are well known devices and proven to work with even simple (old) motors. So, a PWM circuit was obtained (at incredibly reasonable cost), and measured up. In an attempt to at least have the "illusion" of originality, I was determined to use the original hole for the rotary speed control, as well as the original Bakelite control knob. With the shaft on the rotary potentiometer too short for this, I had to do some more metal bashing. As can be seen below, I used the old rheostat as a donor, for a short length of it's shaft, which I would mate to the new potentiometer, allowing the Bakelite knob to operate. This was cut to shape and filed to mate with the new potentiometer shaft. This was then soldered together and thus ready for installation. You can see in the photo, the size and technical comparison between the old rheostat and the new PWM controller circuit.  
    • Next up is the motor speed control. I did think long and hard about my original aim of maintaining as much originality as possible. And, there is no doubt that the original speed control rheostat was a) original and b) functional. But - as I was an electronics technician in an earlier life, and also health and safety professional in a more recent life, the safety aspects weighed heavily upon my concience. Logic played it's part as well - with the original rheostat put back into service, albeit with some hand-made guarding to keep out the fingers of the unwary, it would be safe-ish, for me to use, as long as I kept my wits about me. BUT NOT SAFE FOR ANYONE ELSE unaware of what was underneath. Only the knowledge of what lurked underneath would be keeping me safe, but anyone else might not have a second chance. As can be seen from the photo below, all of the wire on the resistors is not only unguarded, but within millimetres of the level of the base. Also, the incoming mains terminals to the rheostat are also dangerously unguarded. With today's knowledge, it is difficult to fathom how this ever could have been considered safe to use.
    • Back to the job in hand. I managed to find the cork I thought I may have had, lurking in a box under the stairs. It was the most part of an A4 sized sheet, so more than enough for my purposes - to sit the jars on whilst they are in the machine. Looking at the metal bases, I really can't be convinced if there ever was any cork or any other material for that matter there. But for me anyway, the idea of the glass jars sitting directly on the metal base just seems wrong and I would prefer some cork there as a cushion. It's about as tidy as it needs to be, given the shape of the metal webbing. I suppose I could have cut-out squares of cork, but then it would leave potential weak, unsupported areas of cork, which would likely need some form of strengthening. Anyway - this application suits me and helps the jars sit a bit more stable in their locations. Whilst I am in the vicinity, so to speak, I have also added an earth lead which will bond the chassis to the incoming mains lead, once fitted. This is visible in these photos.  
    • A little further research and then on with the show... A quick browse through patent databases, shows that one Saul Lanzetter applied for and was awarded a patent for this design of watch cleaning machine in October 1937. A brief narrative is reproduced here: Interestingly, the patent application is entitled "Improvements in apparatus for cleaning watch parts and other small parts of machinery." It may be reading too much onto this title to assume that there may have been a previous patent, pre-dating this one, as this one refers to "improvements". Also of interest, there were 2 patent applications from US companies in 1944 and 1945 which cite the Lanzetter patent, and three from Germany in 1956, 1960 and 1961 (only one of which was actually published), which also cite the Lanzetter patent as a reference. Incidentally - the two US patents refer to machines which look strikingly similar to the National Model VI-C above, and the National No 4. machine in the earlier advert, showing the four jars side by side ( this seems to be referred to as a lab machine, rather than a repair shop machine). Naturally, all patents or applications referred to above are now expired. For me anyway, I think this may clear up which watch cleaning machine may have come first (at least in this machine format anyway): The S. Lanzetter National Electric Watch Cleaning Machine, circa 1937.  
    • Impressive work. The barrel and mainspring look almost new, and the remaining pitting is no worse than some lesser movements left the factory with. I'm looking forward to the next installment.
×
×
  • Create New...