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Adhesive for dial and marker recommendationn


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Assuming that your goal is to simply re-attach rectangular hour markers I would use any cyanoacrylate "super glue". The trick will be using a small enough application so the extra glue doesn't get all over the dial face.

A photograph would help.

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I find a tiny drop of Gloss Enamel varnish works wonderfully for gluing small item like hour markers, another option that works is tiny drop of simple PVA glue, dries almost clear with a small amount of flexibility once set.

If using a Cyanoacrylate make sure it's fully dried before letting it anywhere near an acrylic crystal, unless you are into fogged crystals that is 😉

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13 minutes ago, Paul80 said:

I find a tiny drop of Gloss Enamel varnish works wonderfully for gluing small item like hour markers, another option that works is tiny drop of simple PVA glue, dries almost clear with a small amount of flexibility once set.

If using a Cyanoacrylate make sure it's fully dried before letting it anywhere near an acrylic crystal, unless you are into fogged crystals that is 😉

Good call Paul, the fumes do react with certain plastics causing hazing. Superglue has virtually no correcting ability and any overspill will almost certainly ruin a dial. I have used clear nail varnish applied with a very fine oiler in the past. As with service lubes, less is more.

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2 hours ago, Paul80 said:

If using a Cyanoacrylate make sure it's fully dried before letting it anywhere near an acrylic crystal, unless you are into fogged crystals

1 hour ago, Neverenoughwatches said:

Good call Paul, the fumes do react with certain plastics causing hazing

Thanks guys! I didn't know that.

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3 minutes ago, grsnovi said:

Thanks guys! I didn't know that.

I only know that because I've used it at work since i was twenty. There are different strengths and different thicknesses depending on its application. I use a thin one when I'm trimming up with upvc mouldings and a thicker one for jointing mdf trims on kitchens.  The thicker one generally needs an activator on one component for the bond to start up. I sometimes use spit 🤢 if I'm on a mission. Some plastics react badly acrylics especially and polycarbonate to even the fumes and other plastics dont stick at all. With the varnish you have a little bit of flexibility in there and it can be corrected, cleaned and dressed up if necessary and careful. But always the best result comes from applying just enough to stick the markers but not enough that it creeps out when applying pressure with whatever adhesive you are going to use. 

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Using an old oiler, and some 90min Araldite epoxy resin should work. As far as I can tell, the epoxy resin does not contain any solvents, and has to be mixed just prior to use so that it will cure… Do note that you have to get the long cure time epoxy, so that you have time to position the stuff.
 

Using less epoxy works better, so that it will not ooze out the sides when you press it into position. You may have to play around with how much epoxy resin your oiler will pick up at a time, as well as how much can be deposited, so you can apply the minimal amount of epoxy to the markers. Dial markers don’t face that much force, so you really need only a tiny amount of epoxy resin to hold it in place. If the dial marker has pins to position it on the dial, you can just apply the epoxy resin to the holes on the dial, then place the dial marker with its pins on. You should clean all surfaces that you are applying the epoxy on prior to attaching.

Do take a look at this thread too: 

 

Edited by ifibrin
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Another option is just do what the makers do, insert the dial marker then apply the glue from the back, ensuring it touches the dial foot as it sits in its hole with a small amount spread onto the dial back around the hole.

They don't take any force so the tiny amount of glue in contact with the end of the foot should be more than enough to hold them in place once the glue has set.

Hope that all makes sense 😉

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On 7/14/2022 at 5:21 AM, Lowbudgetwatch said:

What is the best adhesive for dial and marker repair 

GS Hypo is a very good option. It's designed for gluing crystals so it won't damage the acrylic, it's more than strong enough for the job, and it dries fairly quickly. Carefully applied using an oiler any mess can be cleaned up with IPA.

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On 7/15/2022 at 12:35 AM, grsnovi said:

Assuming that your goal is to simply re-attach rectangular hour markers I would use any cyanoacrylate "super glue". The trick will be using a small enough application so the extra glue doesn't get all over the dial face.

A photograph would help.

Yes sir , i want to re attach a hour maker

10 hours ago, ifibrin said:

Using an old oiler, and some 90min Araldite epoxy resin should work. As far as I can tell, the epoxy resin does not contain any solvents, and has to be mixed just prior to use so that it will cure… Do note that you have to get the long cure time epoxy, so that you have time to position the stuff.
 

Using less epoxy works better, so that it will not ooze out the sides when you press it into position. You may have to play around with how much epoxy resin your oiler will pick up at a time, as well as how much can be deposited, so you can apply the minimal amount of epoxy to the markers. Dial markers don’t face that much force, so you really need only a tiny amount of epoxy resin to hold it in place. If the dial marker has pins to position it on the dial, you can just apply the epoxy resin to the holes on the dial, then place the dial marker with its pins on. You should clean all surfaces that you are applying the epoxy on prior to attaching.

Do take a look at this thread too: 

 

 

7 hours ago, Marc said:

GS Hypo is a very good option. It's designed for gluing crystals so it won't damage the acrylic, it's more than strong enough for the job, and it dries fairly quickly. Carefully applied using an oiler any mess can be cleaned up with IPA.

 

On 7/15/2022 at 1:12 AM, Neverenoughwatches said:

Good call Paul, the fumes do react with certain plastics causing hazing. Superglue has virtually no correcting ability and any overspill will almost certainly ruin a dial. I have used clear nail varnish applied with a very fine oiler in the past. As with service lubes, less is more.

 

On 7/15/2022 at 12:53 AM, Paul80 said:

I find a tiny drop of Gloss Enamel varnish works wonderfully for gluing small item like hour markers, another option that works is tiny drop of simple PVA glue, dries almost clear with a small amount of flexibility once set.

If using a Cyanoacrylate make sure it's fully dried before letting it anywhere near an acrylic crystal, unless you are into fogged crystals that is 😉

Thanks guys i will try to buy that adhesive , hope is available in my country (indonesia)

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11 hours ago, Lowbudgetwatch said:

Thanks guys i will try to buy that adhesive , hope is available in my country (indonesia)

You don't need anything special. Eg. you can use any nail varnish already in your household. Remember that if the marker has feet the gluing in done on the back, not the dial side.

Edited by jdm
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