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Elliott 8 day platform escapement

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Currently working on what I believe to be an early 80’s Elliott 8 day clock that's in need of some attention.

 

While it was running when it came into my possession it was losing 20 minutes over 5 days so needed some attention. She's not had the easiest of lives and it showed. At some stage it looks like someone has taken a Dremel to it, I'm guessing to try and “Polish” things up but they only managed to grind parts such as the end of the barrel arbour. Don't ask me why people do this sort of thing, I've no idea. (Picture attached.)

 

0269c20281fd6506eedf7e2e3752bf8b.jpg

 

Fortunately damage was limited to the end of the barrel arbour that's used for winding so not too much of a problem. I also managed to straighten the end of the arbour that's used to adjust the time with a little gentle pressure. Guessing it will be weakened but it's now straight and no need to look for spares and hen's teeth.

 

Have cleaned up the case as best that I can and she's looking a lot better. The movement has been striped and cleaned. There's some wear in some of the pivot holes in the plates which is not a surprise as I don't think that this one has ever been properly serviced. These will be re-bushed with KWM system bushes once they arrive from H S Walsh later this week.

 

Next step is to strip and clean the platform escapement which will be a first for me. The balance, as expected, is a lot bigger to any watch that I've worked on so can't see too much of an issue apart from gaining access to the end stones to clean and oil. My issue is that I'm not too clear how they are held in place. (See picture attached.)

 

2f653a61e97859673af475dbc7f38b30.jpg

 

Anyone come across something like this before who can offer some advice?

 

 

 

Sent from my moto g(6) play using Tapatalk

 

 

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The barrel arbor is not that bad. Just clean the burs off and polish the end in a lathe if you have one or buff it with emery sticks. It has a thread so it should have a key that is screwed to the arbor. Do no attempt to remove the end stones to the platform; you will never get them back in correctly. If you have a watch-cleaning machine clean all the platform parts in that less the balance wheel, clean that in Ronsonol lighter fluid.

These are good movements I have two 8-day clocks with fully jewelled platforms. These clocks are extremely good timekeepers and will only be a few seconds out in a week. There are some made with only 5 jewel platforms and the real early one have no jewels at all.   

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Thanks before the advice OH on the platform escapement. I'd also not considered that the barrel arbour may have had a thread on it that had been ground off. I'm guessing that someone has modified a barrel from an earlier movement that had a thread on it rather than one where the key is held in place with a set screw. Will try my hand at tidying it up.

c0f65bf8bd1f65b91f9b2d5b54a91b77.jpg

Photo above gives a side view of the barrel arbour taken as I dismantled the movement.

Sent from my moto g(6) play using Tapatalk

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You might find this a good read as an intro to the topic of platform escapements.
http://www.nawcc-index.net/Articles/LaBounty-ServicingAPlatform.pdf
Not sure I’m a fan of craytex to clean pivots. Ideally if they need that, then a jacot tool is the right answer,  but otherwise this is all good stuff.
Thank you for the link, had not seen this before. I can see it being a useful read.

Sent from my moto g(6) play using Tapatalk

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More than likely the screw came loose and got lost and someone filed the arbor down to fit a key they had in the house from another clock.

I have taken a photo of the back of one of my Elliott clocks so you can see what I have been talking about.

P1010347.JPG

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I have an Elliott clock with precisely the same movement as OldHippy's photograph above and the numbers have fallen off the dial blocking the passage of the hands.  I am a complete novice but I would like to be able to stick the numbers back on and get the clock running again (as it is a sentimental value family piece from my wife's family).  I thought that, if I removed the screws from the back (some of which are missing), I would be able to pull out the cylindrical movement, giving me access to the face.  I have tried that and the movement isn't budging out of what appears to be a solid wood case.  Can anyone help me with an explanation of how to get to the face of my clock?

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