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Tag Heuer 1000 Quartz


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Cheers Mates!

Im working on a Tag Heuer 1000, and when was done fixing the watch. It would not start again when putting in battery. Are there a reset thing with these movement. Somebody know??

It was going just fine before I took out the battery.

 

 

 

 

Movment.jpg

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14 minutes ago, arkobugg said:

Cheers Mates!

Im working on a Tag Heuer 1000, and when was done fixing the watch. It would not start again when putting in battery. Are there a reset thing with these movement. Somebody know??

It was going just fine before I took out the battery.

 

 

 

 

Movment.jpg

I have to add to this case, that I had to go in an do an correction because this lever her was misplaced?? see photo: So I placed in the slot to the clutch wheel. I hope that was right??

Lever moved.jpg

Edited by arkobugg
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48 minutes ago, arkobugg said:

I have to add to this case, that I had to go in an do an correction because this lever her was misplaced?? see photo: So I placed in the slot to the clutch wheel. I hope that was right??

 

That is correct. Hope that would solve the problem and that the movement will work again. They are not that common this days and aren't cheap to replace. 

Edited by rogart63
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24 minutes ago, Gpsluvr said:

Did you cover up the gold negative tab with the orange insulator by accident? It has to be showing with the little tab on the insulator under the metal terminal tab. Steve

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

 

Pls explain more what you mean ? Do not  understand ....

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In the area of the top right of the orange insulator where it has a tab going up into a channel, there is supposed to be a gold metal springy tab sticking out and above the insulator. That is what the battery makes contact with on the negative button. The insulator is there to prevent the battery from shorting out to the body which is positive when the battery is in. I can’t see the metal tab at all and assumed it was under the insulator, but I don’t really even see it there, looking through the insulator. It is possible it is completely broken off, which happens all too often if battery acid corroded it. Pull the insulator out and look for it underneath. It should be obvious if it is there. Steve

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

 

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1 minute ago, ecodec said:

Gpsluvr points out that the small negative battery terminal appears to be underneath the orange coloured insulator !. The gold terminal should be visible on top of the insulator !. 

Okay, than I will check that... thanks to all..

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The negative battery terminal  sits  on the circuit so that is not under the orange insulator. The plus is over the battery. So as far as i can see everything is okay. I can't see if it's there on the first picture. 

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10 hours ago, Gpsluvr said:

In the area of the top right of the orange insulator where it has a tab going up into a channel, there is supposed to be a gold metal springy tab sticking out and above the insulator. That is what the battery makes contact with on the negative button. The insulator is there to prevent the battery from shorting out to the body which is positive when the battery is in. I can’t see the metal tab at all and assumed it was under the insulator, but I don’t really even see it there, looking through the insulator. It is possible it is completely broken off, which happens all too often if battery acid corroded it. Pull the insulator out and look for it underneath. It should be obvious if it is there. Steve

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

 

That is beacuse the minus tab is fastened on th print board that I have taken of the movment in the first movment. So the minus tab is laying nice an fine on this photo.

Print plate.jpg

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That lever is the yoke. It also has two additional legs: one inhibits the circuit when the crown is pulled out, and the other jams (hacks) the wheel in the centre. 

Using a loupe, look into the movement and pull the stem in and out. You should see the hack lever touch one of the wheels, but only when the crown is out. 

Also make sure that you did not scratch the coil when changing the battery. That’s a common fault. 

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On 9/30/2018 at 8:27 PM, Gpsluvr said:

In the area of the top right of the orange insulator where it has a tab going up into a channel, there is supposed to be a gold metal springy tab sticking out and above the insulator. That is what the battery makes contact with on the negative button. The insulator is there to prevent the battery from shorting out to the body which is positive when the battery is in. I can’t see the metal tab at all and assumed it was under the insulator, but I don’t really even see it there, looking through the insulator. It is possible it is completely broken off, which happens all too often if battery acid corroded it. Pull the insulator out and look for it underneath. It should be obvious if it is there. Steve

 

13 hours ago, JohnR725 said:

did you ever get your watch running?

13 hours ago, JohnR725 said:

did you ever get your watch running?

Nope, It started with that setting lever was stock in outer posision, so I had to go in via the calender work to get to keyless work, but when I was putting things togheter, I noticed that the clutch wheel could not move along the stem, somthing in brass was jamming the clutch wheel. So I had to take out the print board, and the I found out that the yoke not was in the grove in the clutch wheel. So I placed that right and put things togheter the same way. After that the watch would not start...But I have a friend that are an expert on quartz Tags, so he can fix this. Im more into mechanical watc myself...

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

 

 

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one of the things really important when asking questions is to give a proper description of the problem?  In other words  I see that you took the battery out  you put the battery back in it was running before and now it's not running? But  you also indicated you are fixing a problem in the original question you didn't explain what you are doing?

Then your photograph and your better description of what you did.. The photograph  it appears to be a crown gasket has failed  and rust is migrated down the stem.. The one plate screw in the photograph has the same discoloration like the stem.. This indicates that moisture has  entered the movement. This very likely cause the original setting problem. Then no watch likes rust quartz watches are we way more sensitive. The gear train just has no power for anything that's  going to cause a friction and that includes rusty pivots and the oil going bad. then the photograph of the seconds stop lever the part that goes into the clutch wheel doesn't look quite right in the photograph? It might just be an optical illusion in the photograph.

So if you have a friend who is an expert on quartz watches it's time to visit your friend..  The other problem with quartz and electric watches are  you need test equipment to figure out what the circuitry is doing whether it's working or not  whether the current consumption is too high or whether the coil.is open because it got scratched or bumped.

 

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On 10/5/2018 at 10:21 PM, JohnR725 said:

one of the things really important when asking questions is to give a proper description of the problem?  In other words  I see that you took the battery out  you put the battery back in it was running before and now it's not running? But  you also indicated you are fixing a problem in the original question you didn't explain what you are doing?

Then your photograph and your better description of what you did.. The photograph  it appears to be a crown gasket has failed  and rust is migrated down the stem.. The one plate screw in the photograph has the same discoloration like the stem.. This indicates that moisture has  entered the movement. This very likely cause the original setting problem. Then no watch likes rust quartz watches are we way more sensitive. The gear train just has no power for anything that's  going to cause a friction and that includes rusty pivots and the oil going bad. then the photograph of the seconds stop lever the part that goes into the clutch wheel doesn't look quite right in the photograph? It might just be an optical illusion in the photograph.

So if you have a friend who is an expert on quartz watches it's time to visit your friend..  The other problem with quartz and electric watches are  you need test equipment to figure out what the circuitry is doing whether it's working or not  whether the current consumption is too high or whether the coil.is open because it got scratched or bumped.

 

Hello JohnR725

I appreciate very mutch all the good help I have got during this watch repair!   But that is why I usual stick to mechanical watches, and that this was just for a really good friend. And that I usually dont do quartz.     Thanks to ya all...    :-)

JohnR725

 

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