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Wow you guys have some nice gear. I’m in the poor house compared to you [mention=1704]jdrichard[/mention] with just the one lathe which I’m just starting to use as I’m starting on my first balance staff.

cc8d461a0e77c79fe237b59776bf8d67.jpg&key=e1472f7624b01c0c69617deab68b6e7b832db02f0d5922c5139f0bf1c7486fe7

2f48ee30019d03bdde06ca67cadc321d.jpg&key=0495bb9eb11f58cdb8984a1930d5c33be8203359671ea6bd92e346d30e6594cd

 

As an aside, I’m struggling with getting the belt right, mine keeps breaking at the joint. Is there a trick to getting a good join? I’ve watched Mark’s video and it all seems intuitive it’s just mine doesn’t last more than five minutes.

 

 

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Wow you guys have some nice gear. I’m in the poor house compared to you [mention=1704]jdrichard[/mention] with just the one lathe which I’m just starting to use as I’m starting on my first balance staff.
cc8d461a0e77c79fe237b59776bf8d67.jpg&key=e1472f7624b01c0c69617deab68b6e7b832db02f0d5922c5139f0bf1c7486fe7
2f48ee30019d03bdde06ca67cadc321d.jpg&key=0495bb9eb11f58cdb8984a1930d5c33be8203359671ea6bd92e346d30e6594cd
 
As an aside, I’m struggling with getting the belt right, mine keeps breaking at the joint. Is there a trick to getting a good join? I’ve watched Mark’s video and it all seems intuitive it’s just mine doesn’t last more than five minutes.
 
 
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Go to the shoe store and get a thick leather boot lace. Then cut it to the right size and grip the two ends in a vice of some sort, with the tips just poking out. Then sew them together loosely with fishing line, 5 lb test...and then melt the resulting knot with a match (just the knot). Then straighten the lace out...make sure you do this with the lace inside the lathe headstock. This leather strap will last for a very very long time. I made a video on YouTube on how to do this. Search in jdrichard01

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What belt are you using?

It doesn't look like the green belt.

You also have a pretty large bump where you joined it together which will cause vibrations, and as Oldhippy says your lathe and motor don't look to be aligned.

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Go to the shoe store and get a thick leather boot lace. Then cut it to the right size and grip the two ends in a vice of some sort, with the tips just poking out. Then sew them together loosely with fishing line, 5 lb test...and then melt the resulting knot with a match (just the knot). Then straighten the lace out...make sure you do this with the lace inside the lathe headstock. This leather strap will last for a very very long time. I made a video on YouTube on how to do this. Search in jdrichard01

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This is what I’ve been wanting to hear, something that isn’t a crappy bit of plastic! I subscribe to your vids (I think) but haven’t spotted this one. Will watch it later.



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This is what I’ve been wanting to hear, something that isn’t a crappy bit of plastic! I subscribe to your vids (I think) but haven’t spotted this one. Will watch it later.



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I thought I put it on YouTube, but I may have written it up in these blogs...let me look.


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This is what I’ve been wanting to hear, something that isn’t a crappy bit of plastic! I subscribe to your vids (I think) but haven’t spotted this one. Will watch it later.



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I actually can’t find the video either, sorry. The trick is to make a hole in the end of the leather strap with this tool66048c0161bbe82dd79f54f977c968c6.jpg
Basically you ream a hole a bit bigger than the sewing needle and then use 5lb test fishing line to sew the two ends together...and sew it loose enough so you can straighten the belt out and the two sewed ends are tip to tip. I use a watch hand vice (for enlarging hand holes) to clamp the two ends beside each other so I can make the holes and sew them easily.fb6b3ec60555a17d21cca4e7ffaa4033.jpgHere I am melting the knot end leftovers. I think my video on the Boley Leinen Lathe shows the resulting belt.

And this video at the 1 minute mark shows the belt




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On 11/26/2018 at 1:59 AM, Pip said:

As an aside, I’m struggling with getting the belt right, mine keeps breaking at the joint. Is there a trick to getting a good join? I’ve watched Mark’s video and it all seems intuitive it’s just mine doesn’t last more than five minutes.

 

 

The PTA or Pultra's are beautiful lathes.  they were made by Smart Brown who made top notch tool makers lathe, same caliber as a 10ee or Hardninge HLV.  I've a 10mm PTA, next size up, with all the accouterments and love it.

EVGFDOG.jpg

I struggled with urethane belt joining for a long time.  The challenge is perfect alignment so you have vibration free operation and secondly there is a cure time so it should held perfectly in position for up to 30 minutes.    Sans cure is why the break and the small the size the more challenging a strong perfect joint is - that comes from a conversation with a belt manufacturing when I finally asked for help.   Eventually I made the following fixture and its hard not get perfect joints.  Basically 4 cold rolled steel bars with holes drilled as shown and dowel pins in reamed holes to insure alignment.   First you clamp both sides of the belting with say 1/8" protruding.  Slip a hot knife between the halves, get the belt good and gooey, pull the knife and clamp the to sides together.  Leave for half an hour,  trim with nail clippers and you have a perfect belt.  It works so well I had a belt manufacturer ask to quote making them for them for resell (didn't bother).

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Edited by measuretwice

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I struggled with urethane belt joining for a long time.  The challenge is perfect alignment so you have vibration free operation and secondly there is a cure time so it should held perfectly in position for up to 30 minutes.    Sans cure is why the break and the small the size the more challenging a strong perfect joint is - that comes from a conversation with a belt manufacturing when I finally asked for help.   Eventually I made the following fixture and its hard not get perfect joints.  Basically 4 cold rolled steel bars with holes drilled as shown and dowel pins in reamed holes to insure alignment.   First you clamp both sides of the belting with say 1/8" protruding.  Slip a hot knife between the halves, get the belt good and gooey, pull the knife and clamp the to sides together.  Leave for half an hour,  trim with nail clippers and you have a perfect belt.  It works so well I had a belt manufacturer ask to quote making them for them for resell (didn't bother).

 

 

 

One of the things I love is seeing the cool kit and modifications that people come up with for their own use. That’s a great idea, thanks for sharing.

 

 

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