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Repair help on MB Nicholas Rieussec


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Hi all, I am a newbie here. Currently I am having problems repairing my MB Nicholas Rieussec watch. As this had a Minerva movement and had little experience. I am facing problems on removing the chrono disc. Conventional Chronos uses needle, however this model uses a disc to register the timed lapsed. Does anyone have any experience or advise on the disc removal and installation. Thank you in advance to your kind input.

Kind regards.

Leecbo.    

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Hi Leecbo,

It's unlikely anyone has had one of these across the bench, I imagine they go back to the manufacturer in general if in need of service. I would say that if one is comfortable enough with repair work to dive into an automatic chronograph of unique design it'll be pretty evident how they are attached once in there. My guess is they are pressed on to pivots, and the safest way to remove them would be to slide some watch paper under them and then lift off the dial, pulling the discs with it.

How far into it are you? Can you provide some pics?

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Hi Nickelsilver.

Appreciate everyone's kind input, in fact the watch is with my watch maker now. You did mention, This movement is of an unique and modern design and most watch smith will not have much or any prior experience on the removal/installation of the timed lapsed counter/disc. however I feel its a good try to explore the repair on this design.

From the attached photo and looking at the disc, I do agree with you those are press fit and I believe proper removal will need a designated puller with the claw place into both the hole of the disc, claw on the underside inwards towards the center and acting the fulcrum force on the pivot pin to exert to upward force to extract it.  

Am I in the right approach? Any further input are most welcome. Thanks in advance. 

Kind regards.

Leecbo

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Hi Nickelsilver and all..

Thank you for your valuable insight and the photo of the puller. I will look into the extraction and update of any progress.

Any other further help or suggestion to this issue, as other method or tools applicable/ available are greatly appreciated.

Many thanks for all your great contributions.

Kind regards.

Leecbo.

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Also consider using something simple like the Bergeon 6938. These are very inexpensive little pieces of durable plastic designed to protect a dial when removing hands. However they might also be ideal for sliding under your discs thereby exerting an even pressure on the underside of each disc for removal with some simple leverage.

Whilst it's not your exact model of Nicolas Rieussec you might be interested in this video...https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZshUb8HEZ_8  ... especially about 30 seconds in!

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