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    • By AccidentalWatchmaker
      Hi all,
      I'm currently building a custom watch with an ETA 2892-2 movement. The movement is from an old Brietling. I managed to fix it and was working perfectly. I was in the process of putting it all together, was attaching the second hand and it suddenly stopped. I believe I may have used too much force. However, I have taken the watch apart again (about the 12th time!). I notice that when I move the hacking spring it stops as it should, but when I return it to the position that would usually allow the movement to move again it doesn't. I assumed I'd knocked something out of alignment, but to add to the confusion if I give the escape wheel the slightest nudge it continues ticking. It's baffling me. 
      Anyone have any ideas?
       
      Best,
      Dan

    • By AdamC
      Hello, I've been struggling for two evenings now to fit the train bridge on this ETA 2832. Every time it looks like all pivots are aligned through the jewel holes and I begin tightening the bridge, the wheels begin locking up. On closer examination, it looks to me like the 4th wheel is not seating flush against the centre tube as shown in one of my photos. I believe this because the pinion on the 4th wheel is higher than that of the escape wheel, and equally about the same measurement out between the 4th wheel and the 3rd wheel pinion, which is lower. It also looks like the 4th wheel is fouling under the train bridge.
      In your opinion, would my suspicion be correct or should the 4th wheel's pinion rest approx. 1 to 1.5mm above the flange of the centre tube. If it should be flush, do you have any tips to seating it as such? I have obviously tried carefully wriggling it under light pressure without luck. I've added an extra photo showing the placed wheels during disassembly to give some context.
      Thanks in advance 



    • By Mark
      Join me as I strip down, service and review this Chinese ETA 2892-A2 clone. Seagull ST1812 watch movement. There was a couple of issues to deal with but altogether a fairly impressive movement for the price.
    • By arkobugg
      Hello Mates!
      Im working on an ETA 2783, and suspect that the canon pinion is to tight against the lower wheel.
      So I have to make it a little bit more loose...
      Has anybody done this befor? 
      And how it the best way to do this?
      Thanks   A
       
       
      ETA type of Center Wheel/Cannon Pinion

       
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    • Well, this months pick.  
    • Very good work. Happy to see all the pics and your project.
    • New to watches, I would venture a guess.  Since it was behaving as expected for a full 8 days, then started to switch the date incorrectly, would imply something broke, or became misaligned, or loose at day 8.  Obviously I haven’t a clue, but it’s fun to speculate! would appreciate and update when you figure it out.
    • A gold plated champagne dialed  "Kudu" joins the club. This 17 jewel Swiss front loader needed a service, a crown and stem to get it running. It also benefited from a complete valet, and a crystal polishing session. Finding and fitting a suitable stem was the most tricky part, since the original had broken off right at the edge of the base plate, so extracting without stripping it down was a non starter, and finding something to match the broken stub in my "pile of random stems" took a fair bit of scratching around and experimenting. It looks a whole lot nicer in real life than it does in my rather badly lit photograph. The strap was borrowed from an HMT Kohinoor which is hopefully going to be the next patient up on the healing bench.
    • Nice to be a part of the group. I lurked around awhile go. Just finished level 2 of Mark’s course. I’ve been a member of the NAWCC for many years, and taken their onsite pocket watch repair course, and repaired many since. I also restore old clocks, both the case and movement. Picture attached is of a recent restore. This clock is an 1894 Ansonia that was ready for the trash pile.  I am also in the midst of building a skeleton clock from brass stock. I use a Sherline lathe and mill to turn the wheels and cut the teeth. It has been many years in the making, but has taken its first ticks this year. looking forward to more learning and more work on watches. Mark has a great and easy style for learning.  I’m almost finished servicing my first automatic watch I ever bought, a Tissot embedded with an ETA 2824-2. The mainspring just arrived.    
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