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    • By AccidentalWatchmaker
      Hi all,
      I'm currently building a custom watch with an ETA 2892-2 movement. The movement is from an old Brietling. I managed to fix it and was working perfectly. I was in the process of putting it all together, was attaching the second hand and it suddenly stopped. I believe I may have used too much force. However, I have taken the watch apart again (about the 12th time!). I notice that when I move the hacking spring it stops as it should, but when I return it to the position that would usually allow the movement to move again it doesn't. I assumed I'd knocked something out of alignment, but to add to the confusion if I give the escape wheel the slightest nudge it continues ticking. It's baffling me. 
      Anyone have any ideas?
       
      Best,
      Dan

    • By AdamC
      Hello, I've been struggling for two evenings now to fit the train bridge on this ETA 2832. Every time it looks like all pivots are aligned through the jewel holes and I begin tightening the bridge, the wheels begin locking up. On closer examination, it looks to me like the 4th wheel is not seating flush against the centre tube as shown in one of my photos. I believe this because the pinion on the 4th wheel is higher than that of the escape wheel, and equally about the same measurement out between the 4th wheel and the 3rd wheel pinion, which is lower. It also looks like the 4th wheel is fouling under the train bridge.
      In your opinion, would my suspicion be correct or should the 4th wheel's pinion rest approx. 1 to 1.5mm above the flange of the centre tube. If it should be flush, do you have any tips to seating it as such? I have obviously tried carefully wriggling it under light pressure without luck. I've added an extra photo showing the placed wheels during disassembly to give some context.
      Thanks in advance 



    • By Mark
      Join me as I strip down, service and review this Chinese ETA 2892-A2 clone. Seagull ST1812 watch movement. There was a couple of issues to deal with but altogether a fairly impressive movement for the price.
    • By arkobugg
      Hello Mates!
      Im working on an ETA 2783, and suspect that the canon pinion is to tight against the lower wheel.
      So I have to make it a little bit more loose...
      Has anybody done this befor? 
      And how it the best way to do this?
      Thanks   A
       
       
      ETA type of Center Wheel/Cannon Pinion

       
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    • Greetings folks. I've been working on watches as a hobby for about 20 years now.  I started out on pocket watches and have never cleaned a clock. In fact, I had a great cleaning machine, with the big jars, and a few other clock tools, that I gave away to an aspiring clock guy over at the Tascione site. But I digress... Nearly 20 years ago I bought a Hamilton model 21 ship's chronometer. It's an early one, pre 400 serial number, and is a thing of beauty, as these generally are. Back when I got it, I had a professional service it for me. It was done well, but wasn't cheap. $400-500, IIRC. I used to display it in my living room and run it occasionally just to hear the escapement and marvel it its accuracy. From about 2009 to 2014 it sat in my storage unit, waiting for new digs. In 2014 I wound it up and it took off running. I let it run down and then put it away for a couple of years. When I pulled it out, I discovered that it had a broken balance pivot. While originally I thought someone had knocked it over and was copping to it, but now, after inspecting the upper pivot's wear, I don't think that's the case. After botching the first staff I got trying to replace the hub, I set it aside again for the past couple of years. The way I broke the staff was I overestimated how deep the hollowness went in my hollow punch that I was using to tap it on. It bottomed out in the punch and destroyed the pivot. Now that I'm finally over that disappointment, I decided to give it another go. I bought a staff that already had the hub installed. I may have to polish the lower pivot, as it doesn't seem to want to set in the hole jewel properly. I'm in the process of verifying all of this. I had to tear down the chronometer at least to the point where I could check to see if the broken part of the pivot was impeding the staff from setting properly. The hole jewel is clear. I'm doing the best I can to do it right, and get it running again. I won't be running it, but want it running just in case I should decide to sell it. Otherwise the value drops quite a bit. Since I have it completely torn down now, I might as well clean and oil it. Does anyone have a hot tip on the best cleaning solutions for cleaning these chronometers? I'd like to use something that will cross over and work for my cleaning of watches as well. I have both an ultrasonic and the small L&R mechanical. I have one more fresh batch of cleaner and rinse, petroleum, no-water, formula. Should I use that, or make, or get, something new? Any tips for oil and grease types to get me by? Any suggestions are appreciated. I know that this is risky business, my working on this chrono, but I just can't afford to spend another $500 to get it running. Plus, I heard that if you're going to run these, you've got to spend this $500 or so to service them every few years. That is not going to happen. Feedback, suggestions, warnings, tips, etc., are all welcome. Many thanks. Cheers.  
    • Hello - I have Tag Heuer F1 Chronograph ca1212-ro, which I've had for many, many years.  Recently I noticed a pusher "cap" had come off and was lost, I have sourced an new pusher, and have removed the movement but am at a loss for how to remove the pusher from the case???  The new pusher is not threaded so I'm assuming the old one is not either - assuming the pusher I was sold is correct.  Are the pushers a o-ring press fit, are they "glued" in, how are they removed and reinstalled?  Any help is greatly appreciated!  Thanks - Nick
    • It would just be a video of me poking and prodding for hours I'm afraid. But the basic procedure for me is, move the index right next to the stud holder, and rotate stud so that the hairspring at this point is centered in the index. Then I move the index little by little away from the stud. If at any point as I'm advancing the index I see the hairspring start to deviate from the center of the pins I back the index up and either tighten or widen the curve, checking the curvature by moving the index over the problem spot after every manipulation. I keep doing this until I get to the dog leg and now I have a perfectly formed end curve. Next is to just fiddle with the two bends at the dog leg to get the collet to center on the jewel. Also check constantly that the collet isn't sticking to the cock by tapping on the cock whenever you are checking your work to make sure the hairspring is in its fully relaxed state. I don't have any special techniques really. It's basically just time and patience. Feel free to ask though if you want me to be a little more specific about anything.
    • Now that this project has been completed, I hope that some of you might be inspired to pick up a scroll saw and try out this craft. Its not hard, just tedious and repetitive but you can make some beautiful pieces of art and there are all kinds of patterns out there for everything one could imagine. This clock is not difficult at all, there are clocks that take guys months or even years to make. Cherry tree toys has the most awesome patterns I've come across and Berry basket has some simple yet beautiful stuff, in fact this clock is from a pattern by Cherry tree toys. https://cherrytreetoys.com/scroll-saw-patterns/ https://www.berrybasket.com/
    • I second this approach.  I'll just add heat can also be used to break down the superglue.
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