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    • By AdamC
      Hello,
      I know this is a long shot but would anyone happen to have the technical sheet for the ETA 1164. I acquired this little beauty on ebay; a non-runner from the USA, which needs a lot of TLC. I've never tackled anything quite like this one but fancied the challenge. However, I'm not 100% sure yet whether the everything on the bottom plate under the dial is complete - can anyone confirm? The top plate however looks fine. The watch back is stamped "Seeland Watch Co. Swiss" - having looked it up, it appears Frederick Seeland was once CEO for IWC! Nice historical timepiece once I've restored it. I've added a few photos for reference (yes, I've removed the balance ).
      Thanks in advance.



    • By AccidentalWatchmaker
      Hi all,
      I'm currently building a custom watch with an ETA 2892-2 movement. The movement is from an old Brietling. I managed to fix it and was working perfectly. I was in the process of putting it all together, was attaching the second hand and it suddenly stopped. I believe I may have used too much force. However, I have taken the watch apart again (about the 12th time!). I notice that when I move the hacking spring it stops as it should, but when I return it to the position that would usually allow the movement to move again it doesn't. I assumed I'd knocked something out of alignment, but to add to the confusion if I give the escape wheel the slightest nudge it continues ticking. It's baffling me. 
      Anyone have any ideas?
       
      Best,
      Dan

    • By AdamC
      Hello, I've been struggling for two evenings now to fit the train bridge on this ETA 2832. Every time it looks like all pivots are aligned through the jewel holes and I begin tightening the bridge, the wheels begin locking up. On closer examination, it looks to me like the 4th wheel is not seating flush against the centre tube as shown in one of my photos. I believe this because the pinion on the 4th wheel is higher than that of the escape wheel, and equally about the same measurement out between the 4th wheel and the 3rd wheel pinion, which is lower. It also looks like the 4th wheel is fouling under the train bridge.
      In your opinion, would my suspicion be correct or should the 4th wheel's pinion rest approx. 1 to 1.5mm above the flange of the centre tube. If it should be flush, do you have any tips to seating it as such? I have obviously tried carefully wriggling it under light pressure without luck. I've added an extra photo showing the placed wheels during disassembly to give some context.
      Thanks in advance 



    • By Mark
      Join me as I strip down, service and review this Chinese ETA 2892-A2 clone. Seagull ST1812 watch movement. There was a couple of issues to deal with but altogether a fairly impressive movement for the price.
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    • Very nice! I have an old Miyota movement That needs a new home. You’re giving me ideas! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    • That’s a great watch! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    • Hello everybody. I lived in Texas 51 years before moving “up north” to Oklahoma last year. One of my passions is fixing things - working on the house, appliances, cars, trucks, motorcycles, lawnmowers, and anything else that needs fixing and I’ve been good at it except when it comes to watches - what a humbling experience. Googling “broken set lever screw 6497” led me down a trail that led to this forum.   For watches: I like just about everything regardless of cost. I have a 1969 Datejust that my grandfather bought new (my watch addiction started there when I was little), and a 1966 Datejust I recently picked up, an Omega AT, a few Seikos, a Vostok, a couple Citizens, an old Bulova, a few Timexes, and a wristwatch-from-pocketwatch conversion with a genuine 6498 movement. Like many of y’all I’m sure, I’ve bought and sold a ton of watches since 1985 and haven’t slowed down.   The embarrassing screw-breaking watch is a Panerai look-alike with an ST36 Chinese copy of a 6497. It’s cheap but I figured it was good to learn on. Water was getting in, and the set lever screw was stuck so I broke it trying to get the stem out. Broke the two stuck movement mounting tab screws also, probably due to the water. Got a new ST36 and broke the same dang set lever screw trying to replace the stem. Can’t blame the water this time. Had no idea a tiny screwdriver could deliver enough torque to break screws. The price of education... I need to enroll in a course and stop red-necking this stuff.   I have plenty ST36 parts if y’all need any -except screws....   Great to be here,   Bobo         Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro  
    • Hi William, Welcome to the forum. Have been to Elvis and Dolly parton show at Grand ole opry.  Carried out research work in the Atomic City.    Glad to have you here with us. Best wishes. Joe
    • To find out if the slot is in the right place, get a piece of wood wide enough to take the movement, use a 3/8th inch bolt and cut a slot in the end to take the suspention spring, drill a hole near the top of the wood and attach the bolt with a nut. hook the pendulum onto the suspention spring, attach the movement to the board where the crutch is at about the middle of the slot on the pendulum, if the movement is working? the clock should work, attach the hands and see if it is keeping time, which I doubt as I think the slot is way to low, anyway now you have this set up you can just move the movement UP or down till you find the right place for the slot. You do not need to cut the slot while trying to find the right place,  just drill a hole a 1/16th of an inch wider than the crutch, you may end up with a few holes however when about in the right place then cut the slot an 1/2 inch above and below the hole, you can fill to holes or just buy a new pendulum stick.
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