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Lovely find

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Ahhhh Facebook market place, just picked this Hermle 791-681 up for £12, apparently it’s overwound, as we know you can’t do that, I put some power in the train and it ticked away for about 30 secs so I’m guessing a damn good service and clean and it will run like a good ‘un 

A4E1D9ED-9038-402D-AE75-31A7AB2D074E.jpeg

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2 hours ago, transporter said:

Ahhhh Facebook market place, just picked this Hermle 791-681 up for £12, apparently it’s overwound, as we know you can’t do that, I put some power in the train and it ticked away for about 30 secs so I’m guessing a damn good service and clean and it will run like a good ‘un 

A4E1D9ED-9038-402D-AE75-31A7AB2D074E.jpeg

Beautiful find, the dome is worth a bit if it's glass..Lovely clock..

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Cheers guys, thanks for the info old hippy, I did wonder why in cousins they say that hermle reccomend replacing a whole movement as it will likely be cheaper than a service!!

and yes the dome is glass, so that’s being looked after rather carefully

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image.thumb.jpg.a27757eb2101c108061f8d12b752f341.jpgiWell four hours solid work, ok I had a couple of cups of tea in between and I now have a lovely working and chiming some clock. It was a simple movement to work on (unlike the 3 train Westminster one that’s next) and again the old brasso lighter fluid and French chalk came into action for the great finish. I did find some of the wheels had a lacquer finish on them that obviously without an ammonia soak won’t come up shiney, but they do give a good contrast if you look close enough.

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No significant that I could see, it's holding really good time, it was 15 minutes slow after the service but a few turns of the nut to raise the bob and all is well, I personally don't think it is very old, maybe only 10 years or so, definitely hasn't been serviced before anyway, as for the strike it's an hourly one only. And as for the french chalk it's great, I need to invest in a couple of new brushes though as mine is shedding lots of bristles every time I use it!

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29 minutes ago, TimFitz said:

Very nice work & a very attractive clock :)

One question : What is French chalk, and what is it's purpose?

TimFitz

After cleaning and polishing brass. If you French chalk the brass parts with a soft clean brush it prevents tarnish of brass and can add that extra shine. Some clockmakers still use this old process today. It is also another way in which you do not need to bother to lacquer parts.

 

French chalk is magnesium silicate.

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2 hours ago, oldhippy said:

 

After cleaning and polishing brass. If you French chalk the brass parts with a soft clean brush it prevents tarnish of brass and can add that extra shine. Some clockmakers still use this old process today. It is also another way in which you do not need to bother to lacquer parts.

 

French chalk is magnesium silicate.

Cheers oldhippy beat me to it,  yep as old hippy says that what it does, its cheap aswell, I think I only paid a few quid for my block from cousins, you have to move the brush very fast but nice and light at the same time to get the best results, then peg out all your pivot holes.

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