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watch service includes regulation?

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I'm having a watch serviced for the first time, its a vintage (1974) Seiko 5 Actus, because its running two mins fast, i don't know its past history.

Will a service include regulations or is that a separate service?

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Watch repairs/makers have timing machines in order to be able to tell how the movement is preforming, gaining or losing time. That is the modern way of being able to adjust the movement’s time keeping; this is normally part of the service. You should have enquired what the servicing entailed, no harm in asking them.     

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1 hour ago, no-time said:

I'm having a watch serviced for the first time, its a vintage (1974) Seiko 5 Actus, because its running two mins fast, i don't know its past history.

Will a service include regulations or is that a separate service?

Of course it does. Your watch is already accurate enough for collector's purposes and can probably made better with just demagnetization and regulation.

Also be aware that service cost by a qualified processional can easy be three or four time the value of your watch or even a brand new Seiko 5.

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Thanks for the reply guys. 

So generally speaking a typical service for a vintage watch that is working but running fast would include:

1.Replacement of worn out parts if needed (probably less likely  if the watch is running) 

2.Cleaning 

3. Lubricating 

4. Demagnetising 

5. Regulating

Anything else? 

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I haven't sent the Seiko 5 to for a service yet, I've ordered a Demagnetiser so I'll try that first. 

I have a few affordable wathes, mainly Seiko, Miyota and Vostok's, i want to regulate and do some light modding (change the dial and hands), I have £100 max to spend on tools, so no Bergeon tools for now. I can't find a £100 watch repair kit from England? Any suggestions please? 

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37 minutes ago, no-time said:

I haven't sent the Seiko 5 to for a service yet, I've ordered a Demagnetiser so I'll try that first. 

I have a few affordable wathes, mainly Seiko, Miyota and Vostok's, i want to regulate and do some light modding (change the dial and hands), I have £100 max to spend on tools, so no Bergeon tools for now. I can't find a £100 watch repair kit from England? Any suggestions please? 

I use mainly re-engineered Chinese tools. Filing, stoning and heat treatment as necessary. Drill steel makes good screwdriver tips. Tweezers of most makes need specific attention. Just my way of doing things, no rip off costs and they work very well indeed for an old Jobber Fixer like me. Just spend a little time on them to get them right.  Regards, Mike. PS. (not everyone will agree)

 

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