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Nucejoe

Those Vintage oris that stop working a month or so after cleaned

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Hi everyone. Some vintage oris stop running not long after cleaned, I am sure the problem is common with vintage oris 677 kif and 704 kif.since I got many of them. I think of worn down staffs or weak main spring as the cause.

Interestingly dropping one drop of aircraft fuel on top of the upper and lower jewels of balance wheel only and it fly like combat jet.

Lots of hope to recieve your opinion.

Regards joe

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On 10/3/2018 at 4:30 PM, vinn3 said:

  isopropinal (alcohol),   you can get it at the drug store.  vin

Hi @vinn3 , I finally found me some isopropinal( dermatologist) . The issue was cleaning /rinsing jewels on chatons. Any further advice before I dive in with the jewels. Thanks in advance.

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I use this stuff instead, it gives you a much better Buzz when you decide to thake a zip after watching the cap jewel fly away with an magical arch.
But Before that I just leve them lying in a small jar with a cap to soak, and finish of with peg wood.

995.jpg

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So far this thread seems to have concentrated on what to clean the jewels with, but I think you also need to be aware of what your enemy looks like. I've linked to the bit that shows some good examples of oil turned to snot, but it is worth watching the whole thing if you have the time. Also look through some of Mark's videos, he shows examples of manufacturing debris in one of his Seagull movement videos (which I can't track down at the moment). 

This video gives a very concise view of what you may be missing. The issue is that often what I think is clean, isn't. This is where good magnification and good light comes in to play. Half a dozen trips through the ultrasonic, and any number of magic secret sauce cleaning fluids, may simply not be getting at the dirt in the first place.

Old oil is strange stuff. Sometimes it goes colloidal and viscous, sometimes it goes dry and powdery,  sometimes it turns to tar, sometimes it is more like varnish or plastic, and in the latter form, it seem that only mechanical intervention will actually ensure that you get the dratted stuff removed as it appears to become impervious to both lighter fluid and detergent. 

The "green cheese" and other dirt that gets in to places like the keyless works, and from there pretty much everywhere else, and the flakes of corrosion and machining swarf, and bits of ablated plating, are also sometimes almost completely impervious to cleaning fluids, as are human hairs and clothing fibers. When all else fails, you cant beat old school careful inspection and mechanically cleaning by hand.

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48 minutes ago, HSL said:

I use this stuff instead, it gives you a much better Buzz when you decide to thake a zip after watching the cap jewel fly away with an magical arch.
But Before that I just leve them lying in a small jar with a cap to soak, and finish of with peg wood.

995.jpg

  its not easy to find 99.5 isoprop.,     usually 75, but is still cleans and "may be less distructive"  on the shelack.  the big diference is -- you can drink ethanol. !

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54 minutes ago, AndyHull said:

So far this thread seems to have concentrated on what to clean the jewels with, but I think you also need to be aware of what your enemy looks like. I've linked to the bit that shows some good examples of oil turned to snot, but it is worth watching the whole thing if you have the time. Also look through some of Mark's videos, he shows examples of manufacturing debris in one of his Seagull movement videos (which I can't track down at the moment). 

An informativ video but that oil wasn't that bad seen worse in lots of my vintage watches..lol.  He makes a good Point there with the microscope I Always check the parts after cleaning and use an Carl Zeiss Stemi DV4 Stereo Microscope for the task. Doing so has improved the performance of many of my watches since one can see where the dirt still is stuck and probably cut down the fault finding time since one doesn't have to worry about the dirt factor. And a final inspection is never wrong to ensure the cats haven't left any presents in the movement when it is assembled.
For my own records I seldom have the low resolution shots from a mobile camera but treat myself to have a slightly better quality since they are stored localy on the harddrive and dont need to be published. So for that task one can use something like this.

To the right it is an Nicon SMZ800N and to the left a Nicon LV100 POL.

Thank you for this Andy good Point and probably often forgotten..
 

IMG_20190516_121008.jpg

Edited by HSL

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2 minutes ago, vinn3 said:

  its not easy to find 99.5 isoprop.,     usually 75, but is still cleans and "may be less distructive"  on the shelack.  the big diference is -- you can drink ethanol. 

So do I just drop the jewel-chaton in and shake?   Shake-let soak- shake ?

I can peg the jewel hole, but not the jewels concave side facing inside the chaton.

This is fifty year old dried vinatge oil.

Chaton-jewel assembly isn,t as perfect of a design as some beleive. Inside the chaton  is a good reservoir for oil to accumulate and become a nightmare. 

This is I :pulling-hair-out: thinking of a vat of hot boiling water, to melt and bring out the oil.

 

 

 

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The Finn's  had an interesting solvent for  cleaning : Cosin Corba.   vin
A Finn gave me the recipe the Finnish watchmaking school uses for clocks. It works well and is quite gentle. For anyone interested it's:
1 liter 99% iso alcohol
3 liters distilled water
60g oleic acid
50g oxalic acid
Everything heated in a stainless pot until quite warm, then ammonia, mixed in last, adding until the solution turns clear (about 80g of 25% ammonia)

The ammonia and oleic acid form a soap, and the ammonia is sort of neutralized so it doesn't eat into brass parts. The oxalic acid is a gentle rust remover.

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5 hours ago, nickelsilver said:

A Finn gave me the recipe the Finnish watchmaking school uses for clocks. It works well and is quite gentle. For anyone interested it's:
1 liter 99% iso alcohol
3 liters distilled water
60g oleic acid
50g oxalic acid
Everything heated in a stainless pot until quite warm, then ammonia, mixed in last, adding until the solution turns clear (about 80g of 25% ammonia)

The ammonia and oleic acid form a soap, and the ammonia is sort of neutralized so it doesn't eat into brass parts. The oxalic acid is a gentle rust remover.

    thanks;  vin

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